Home renovation: “Ugliest” house in best street transformed

first_img“We really had to go to, not one, but two neighbours and get their permission to run all our earthmoving equipment through their yards. “I don’t how many hundreds of tonnes of dirt we removed. So it was only possible because of our neighbours.” AFTER: The front of the house at 64 Alma St, Paddington, after it was renovated. Picture supplied by Ray White.For a man who had carved out a media career in sharing secrets on winning competitions, it appeared that Mr Seitam’s luck had run out.Known as, “that competitions guy”, Mr Seitam has spent the past 14 years as the founder and editor of CompetitionsGuide.com.au. “We took a rental in Paddington that first year with the idea of finding a place that could either be a project or the work had already been done,” he said.“It had to have a panoramic city view, but our luck ran out as there was very little we liked on the market. “By chance, the ugliest house on Alma Street came on the market.” “The irony is, it was so bad it turned us off buying a house two doors up. “We thought, we can’t live near this thing because it looked so horrible.” AFTER: The kitchen and dining area of the home at 64 Alma St, Paddington, after it was renovated. Picture supplied by Ray White.Out of curiosity, the Seitams walked around the back of the house, looked over the roof and started to see potential.The original two-storey building had been used as a boarding house, configured into four small bedrooms on the top floor with a separate flat containing three bedrooms below.“It was a classic case of worst house, best street,” Mr Seitam said.The couple came up with a plan to make the most of the elevated site and capture a spectacular uninterrupted view, while retaining the original cottage and dealing with the hurdles of a steep slope and poor access. AFTER: The back of the home at 64 Alma St, Paddington, after it was renovated. Picture supplied by Ray White.This involved renovating and extending the existing building, adding a third level, a garage, a heated pool and landscaping the site — all at the same time.“To put that last storey on was the icing on the cake because that gave us views that will never be built out,” Mr Seitam said.“What we didn’t realise at the time was how difficult the access was going to be. MORE: Bachelor and MAFS stars in shock split AFTER: The laundry after it was renovated. Picture supplied by Ray White.The result is, arguably, one of the most impressive renovations in Paddington — a tropical twist on the classic Queenslander design. The five-bedroom property has its own private, self-contained guest accommodation with a kitchenette and bathroom.There’s a covered, outdoor entertaining area with built-in kitchen, barbecue and wine fridge.The master bedroom has a wide, city-facing balcony, ensuite and walk-in wardrobe, while the rumpus room opens out onto a patio and covered deck.Other features include an outdoor shower, separate laundry, powder room, storage room and double garage.The Seitams are looking to downsize, declaring the home is now “too big for us”. BEFORE: The back of the home at 64 Alma St, Paddington, before it was renovated. Picture supplied by Ray White.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus14 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market14 hours ago BEFORE: The living room in the home at 64 Alma St, Paddington, before it was renovated. Picture supplied by Ray White. BEFORE: The kitchen in the home at 64 Alma St, Paddington, before it was renovated. Picture supplied by Ray White. Helen and Craig Seitam at their renovated house at 64 Alma St, Paddington, which is now for sale. Photographer: Liam Kidston.WHEN Helen and Craig Seitam migrated north from Sydney, they set their hearts on living in Brisbane’s quaint inner-city suburb of Paddington.But it was far from love at first sight when they came across a rundown 1920s cottage at 64 Alma Street. “This was a shocker of a house,” Mr Seitam said. RELATED: Renovated stunner hits market AFTER: The back courtyard after it was renovated. Picture supplied by Ray White.Surprisingly, despite the barriers and scale of the transformation, it took the Seitams less than a year to create their much-loved, tropical Queenslander home.“There are renovations around here that started before we moved in and are still going, and we were adamant that wasn’t going to happen, which is why I took over the project management,” Ms Seitam said.“I was here each day in my floral gumboots because the whole place was a big muddy hole. “We punched hard and didn’t muck around.” BEFORE: The laundry in the home at 64 Alma St, Paddington, before it was renovated. Picture supplied by Ray White. BEFORE: The front of the house at 64 Alma St, Paddington, before it was renovated. Picture supplied by Ray White. BEFORE: The back courtyard at the home at 64 Alma St, Paddington, before it was renovated. Picture supplied by Ray White. AFTER: One of the living rooms in the home after it was renovated. Picture supplied by Ray White.Marketing agent Christine Rudolph of Ray White New Farm said the home typified “some of the incredible transformations we’re currently seeing to the Paddington streetscape”. “What’s very exciting about it is that transformations like this are really satisfying buyers’ thirst for a beautiful lifestyle home already completed and so close to the CBD,” Ms Rudolph said.“There’s no doubt in the past 12 months we’ve really seen continued evidence of buyer demand for these types of homes, which has driven prices up by more than 10 per cent.”The home is within walking distance of the CBD, South Bank and Rosalie Village and is in the Milton State School catchment.The property is scheduled to go to auction on March 26 at Ray White New Farm’s ‘Auction Under the Stars’ event.RENO FACT CHECKTime taken: Eight monthsTotal spend: $1.2mlast_img read more

Holiday lifestyle still pulling richlisters to iconic QLD location

first_img FOLLOW SOPHIE FOSTER ON FACEBOOK “Solis” at 4 Plum Pudding Close, Hamilton Island was listed at $15m. Villa Botanica has a unique style. There was a long settlement period on the deal.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus13 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market13 hours ago“It’s another very significant sale for us in the Whitsundays region and we’ve had a number in the past 12 to 18 months. This was a longer settlement, it’s been unconditional for a few months.”Among other major transactons in the area was Solis on Hamilton Island which was marketed circa $15m with the actual sales price undisclosed. That sale settled two months ago.Last year’s big ones included Aqua on Mandalay Point and Mandalay House before that – both in the $12-15m range. Villa Botanica has settled for just over $7m.One of Queensland’s most iconic holiday destinations has quietly seen another megamillion-dollar property change hands, as richlisters continue to fan the area.The Whitsundays – an archipelago that includes Whitsunday Island, and those of Hamilton, Hook and Lindeman – saw the stunning Villa Botanica settle yesterday for just over $7m.Queensland Sotheby’s International Realty head Paul Arthur said settlement was complete late yesterday. It is a popular wedding venue in the Whitsundays. Picture: Norina Jane, Whitsunday Photographer The Whitsundays are still a haven for richlisters looking for a lifestyle boost.“If you look at that part of the world, it’s kind of the playground for the rich and famous,” Mr Arthur said. “What we see is properties turn over every five to 10 years because they’ve gone up there, had their fun, then they look for another lifestyle location. “It could be Byron Bay or a tree change to acreage but again with this level of clients they’re typically lifestyle properties. Obviously these are very high net worth individuals.” The unique architecture of Solis makes it hard to replicate. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p216p216p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHow much do I need to retire?00:58last_img read more

Cattle baron downsizes from bush to city

first_imgIt has six bedrooms, and a mix of formal and informal living spaces with ornate original features such as a working fireplace, lead lighting, french doors, hardwood floors, decorative horsehair plaster ceilings, hand cut crystal chandeliers and antique bronze light fittings. It was marketed by Christine Rudolph and Matt Lancashire of Ray White New Farm. The Highgate estate sits on a private 1712sq m of land, and was designed by renowned architect, Richard Gailey.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus11 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market11 hours ago Mr Camm still has a number of land lots in his own name, but several other landholdings have sold in recent years.Property records show a Moranbah holding was bought by mining giant Anglo Coal for $1,783,600 in 2017.News reports said the company also sold three cattle properties to Rural Funds Group. The land is held by a trust and leased back to the family.However, David Camm’s latest acquisition is far more glamorous, and was bought for $2.8 million in July. The Camm family own Camm Agricultural Group, which is headed by David Camm.His wife Judy Camm passed away in 2017, and is still listed as an owner on their cattle breeding and fattening lot near Toowoomba.The family has featured on the Sunday Mail Rich List. center_img Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:02Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:02 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreen5 wow rural home sales around Australia01:03One of Queensland’s richest beef barons has purchased a stunning property in Brisbane — miles away from the crippling drought out west.It can now be revealed that David Camm has been listed as the new owner of Highgate, a stunning Spanish mission-style residence and estate that was once home to Elizabeth Hart, the second woman to be admitted as a solicitor in Queensland. David Camm (right) at the City Meets Country event a few years ago. Picture: Andrea Crothers There is also an office plus a separate office/studio with a balcony, an open plan kitchen that overlooks the more casual dining and living rooms, wide verandas, a pool, pergola and a large level garden and lawn.Further living areas include a billiard room and an attic/rumpus.The Camm family were named on Queensland’s Rich List in 2014, and own huge tracts of land around the state with their children, including Bryce Camm, the CEO of the Wonga Plains Feedlot and president of the Australian Lot Feeders’ Association. Bryce Camm from Camm Agruicultural Group at the Wonga Plains Feedlot, near Bowenville. Pic Mark Cranitch.last_img read more

Townsville home brings people together

first_img4 Hooper Street, Belgian Gardens, TownsvilleFOR the best part of nearly a century, 4 Hooper St, Belgian Gardens, has been a much-loved home for multiple Townsville families.Built in the 1930s, it was a chance encounter that reunited current homeowner Kaylene Mladenovic with an old friend, who had her own connection to the property, affectionately known as Merton.“One of my very close friends that I met in Mt Isa, lives in Townsville now too,” Mrs Mladenovic said.“I hadn’t seen her in a couple of years and I ran into her and told her I’d bought a house.”Mrs Mladenovic purchased the property with her husband, Predrag, in 2013.“As it turned out, this was her Dad’s (former) house,” she said. One of three verandas surrounding the residence which have views of Castle Hill and The Strand“Her grandparents built this house and her father grew up in it; so it was a funny turn of events.”Named after the first family to have lived in the residence, the Mladenovic family purchased the property with the intention of making it a “forever home” for them and their three children, now aged 20, 21 and 22.“We wanted to have enough space for our children to stay at home for as long as they wanted to, and not feel like the house was too small for them,” Mrs Mladenovic said.“So we built the additional level to provide just a bit more space, with areas where people could go and study by themselves or things like that.”Over the past seven years, the family have made extensive renovations to the property, which features six bedrooms and four bathrooms. The house has been sympathetically renovated.“Our favourite memories are actually having guests and friends come to stay,” Mrs Mladenovic said. “Because it’s so big, we’ve always been able to have people stay here.“We’re actually quite sad to be leaving, but the kids have moved out and there’s just too many rooms now.“When I realised there were some rooms I might not walk into for months, I knew it was time. Some other family should get to enjoy it.”A teacher by trade, Mrs Mladenovic and her husband have a reputation for restoring and renovating properties throughout Townsville; although this has been their biggest passion project.“We’re big-time renovators; we love to take houses that need a bit of love and bring them back to their former glory, and this one here was going to be our forever home,” she said. The kitchen is modern and spacious.“(Renovating) is something that we’ve always done for our family; just to make our family homes nicer for our kids.”Set on easy-care 1094sq m established grounds, the property offers unparalleled excellence at every turn, according to Ray White agent Julie Mahoney.“It’s a wholesome renovation,” she said.“It’s for somebody who really wants everything; it’s multifaceted.”Originally from NSW, the Mladenovics spent 12 years in Alligator Creek followed by a short stint in North Ward, before buying their current property. More from news01:21Buyer demand explodes in Townsville’s 2019 flood-affected suburbs12 Sep 202001:21‘Giant surge’ in new home sales lifts Townsville property market10 Sep 20204 Hooper Street will go to auction on May 25 and 6pm.“It’s just awesome; the neighbourhood is great and it’s so close to the beach and the breeze is, it’s everything,” Mrs Mladenovic said.Having renovated the Queenslander from a lowset to a highset home, the property includes multiple open-plan living areas, as well as two kitchens.“It would suit any family, even an extended family,” Mrs Mladenovic said.“For a family of five, it was fantastic when the three kids were here because they all had their own bathrooms. We really (want to) let some other family move in and enjoy it like we have.”Standing on her front veranda, Mrs Mladenovic described the view which had captivated her heart for the past seven years.“I’m standing on the front deck at the moment and I’m looking at Magnetic Island and I can see the water, but just snippets, but I’m up among the trees, looking out, and the breeze is beautiful.” The pool is surrounded by landscaped gardens and fruit trees.The three veranda’s surrounding the residence also include views of Castle Hill, The Strand and offer “the best” view of Townsville’s New Year’s Eve fireworks.Out the back, a large pool comes with the convenience of a neighbouring pool house, which include a toilet and shower.“We’ve also got a few fruit trees,” Mrs Mladenovic said, with the landscaped gardens also including a sunken fire pit.A walkway leads from the main house down to a back office, with a carport also attached to the house with enough room for four vehicles.“It’s very safe and secure,” Mrs Mladenovic said, with the property surrounded by a 1.8-metre fence and access via electric gates.Located close to the city and with amenities including a coffee shop, mini mart and Soroptimist Park also within walking distance, Ms Mahoney said 4 Hooper St was certainly one of a kind.last_img read more

Drewry: Weak Freight Outlook to Affect VLGC Asset Values

first_imgGiven the weak freight rate outlook for LPG shipping over the next twelve months, there is more downside risk to the second-hand values of very large gas carriers (VLGCs), according to shipping consultancy Drewry.Shipping analysts have been bearish on the VLGCs market since the beginning of the year and rates so far have been in line with expectations. Vessel earnings in the spot market are currently below operating cost.Drewry said that it maintains a bearish outlook and believes that the next twelve months “will continue to be tough for VLGC owners due to strong fleet growth. The recovery phase will not start until the second half of 2018 as fleet growth slows as a consequence of weak ordering over the past 18 months.”One anomaly in the current market is that second-hand VLGC values have not come down as sharply as the freight market and are trading at a high multiple to vessel earnings.“Considering our weak freight outlook for the next twelve months, we expect there is more downside risk to second-hand values of VLGCs. Therefore, we expect second-hand prices of VLGCs to correct by another 5%-8% over the next one year,” Shresth Sharma, Drewry’ senior analyst for gas shipping, said.last_img read more

Hydro Group Systems Nets US Navy Deal

first_imgHydro Group Systems, subsidiary of subsea cable and connector specialist Hydro Group, has secured its inaugural contract in the US, worth an estimated $550,000.The company has secured a contract with the US Navy to supply neutrally-buoyant plow umbilicals for the Military Sealift Command, an organisation which is responsible for providing sealift and ocean transportation for all US military services.Hydro Group Systems has also expanded its footprint and workforce in the region with the launch of its manufacturing facility in Pinellas County, Florida, and the appointment of Christopher Scanlon, as senior design engineer.Bill Mildon, Hydro Group Systems’ president, said: “We are proud to have been selected to provide this comprehensive scope to the US Navy, which further underpins our reputation as a serious provider of bespoke engineered cable and connector assembly solutions.“We are firm believers in offering excellent service quality, and a permanent local presence in the US allows us to continue to surpass client expectations by offering a superior service, while building on our customer base.”Furthermore, Hydro Group Systems has also announced a new partnership with Texas-based Design Forward an agency representing manufacturers who specialize in custom-engineered components.last_img read more

Santos hits record production in 2019

first_imgAustralian LNG player Santos, the operator of the GLNG project, reported record production and revenue for the year 2019. Santos’ annual production reached 75.5 mmboe, 28 percent above the 58.9 mmboe reported in 2018.Sales volumes for the year 2019 reached 94.5 mmboe, 21 percent above the 78.3 mmboe sold in the previous year, the company noted in its report. Sales revenue kicked up 10 percent reaching a company record of $4 billion, which compares to $3.6 billion in 2018.Santos added that its fourth-quarter production of 18.7 mmboe was 5 percent lower than the prior quarter primarily due to domestic gas customer outages in Western Australia.The average realized LNG price reached $9.77/mmBtu, down from $9.91/mmBtu in 2018.Fourth-quarter LNG production was the highest of 2019, supported by strong upstream production growth. The GLNG target to deliver 6 mtpa equivalent run-rate was achieved in the month of October, with an annualized sales runrate, including volumes redirected to the domestic market, exceeding 6 mtpa annualized. Santos now expects a GLNG annualized sales run-rate of ~6.2 mtpa from 2020.A total of 104 wells were drilled across the GLNG acreage in the fourth quarter. A record number of wells were drilled and connected in 2019, namely 393 wells were drilled, 29 percent higher than 2018 and 431 wells were connected, 44 percent higher than 2018.Sixty-two development wells were drilled across Santos’ non-operated Eastern Queensland acreage in the quarter.last_img read more

CDC: ‘No Sail Order’ for cruise ships extended through September 2020

first_img Posted: 3 months ago These cases were part of 99 outbreaks on 123 different cruise ships, according to the US health protection agency. Posted: 3 months ago The latter two will be renamed MS Bolette and MS Borealis and will be operated by Fred. Olsen Cruise Lines, Bonheur said in a separate statement. As of 3 July, nine of the 49 ships under the No Sail Order have ongoing or resolving outbreaks. According to U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) data, as of 10 July 2020, there are 67 ships with 14,702 crew onboard. Cruise lines coping with losses, speeding up vessel sales This order continues to suspend passenger operations on cruise ships with the capacity to carry at least 250 passengers in waters subject to US jurisdiction. Starting in March, cruise lines around the globe suspended sailings due to travelling restrictions imposed by governments aimed at minimising the spread of the coronavirus. The ships have been sold in pairs, with the S-class Maasdam and Veendam transferring to one company in August 2020, while the R-class Amsterdam and Rotterdam will move to Norwegian company Bonheur ASA in fall 2020. On cruise ships, passengers and crew share spaces that are more crowded than most urban settings. Even when only essential crew are on board, ongoing spread of COVID-19 still occurs. Cumulative CDC data from 1 March through 10 July 2020, shows 2,973 COVID-19 or COVID-like illness cases on cruise ships, in addition to 34 deaths. Voyage cancellations and prolonged vessel layups have been negatively affecting cruise companies’ earnings. Categories: Royal Caribbean Cruises, another cruise line giant, announced earlier this year major job cuts amid the impact of the coronavirus on its business, targeting over 5,000 US employees. In late March, the cruise company also secured a $2.2 billion loan to boost its liquidity position. Earlier this week, Carnival’s Holland America Line also announced that four of its ships — the 2000-built Amsterdam, the 1993-built Maasdam, the 1997-built Rotterdam and the 1996-built Veendam — will be leaving the fleet and transferring to new owners.center_img During the abovementioned time frame, 80 per cent of ships were affected by COVID-19. Operations & Maintenance In late June, Carnival’s Costa Cruises sold its 1996-built cruise ship Costa Victoria for demolition in Italy. Carnival Corp. recently announced its plans to offload thirteen ships from its fleet through demolition and sales to curb the impact of the health crisis. In the quarter ended 31 May 2020, Carnival Corporation & plc., the world’s largest cruise company and the owner of Carnival Cruise Line brand, suffered a net loss of $4.4 billion due to the suspension of cruise operations. Cruise lines are implementing different measures in an effort to reduce operating expenses and improve liquidity. One of such measures is disposing of older vessels. Numerous COVID-19 cases on cruise vessels CLIA: Cruise lines extend suspension of operations from US ports until mid-September If unrestricted cruise ship passenger operations were permitted to resume, passengers and crew on board would be at increased risk of COVID-19 infection and those that work or travel on cruise ships would place substantial unnecessary risk on healthcare workers, port personnel and federal partners, and the communities they return to, CDC further said. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has further extended a ‘No Sail Order” for cruise ships through 30 September 2020. MS Amsterdam in Seattle. Image by Carnival Corporation “In line with CLIA’s announcement of voluntary suspension of operation by its member companies, CDC has extended its No Sail Order to ensure that passenger operations on cruise ships do not resume prematurely,” CDC said. It follows the 19 June decision by the Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) to voluntarily extend the suspension of cruise operations from US ports until mid-September.last_img read more

$31m owed to children in Bay of Plenty

first_imgBay of Plenty Times 21 May 2012Western Bay of Plenty parents owe $31.1 million in unpaid child-support payments – of which $19.4 million is late-payment penalties. In the last financial year, 5782 parents in the Western Bay had to pay child support to the Inland Revenue Department (IRD), which collected payments on behalf of parents. Parents who did not have full custody of their children were paying an average of $1370 per year – about $26 a week per child – for a total of 7785 children.  … Family First NZ national director Bob McCoskrie said the child-support system had to be fair to both parents. He said child support should be targeted at parents who abandoned their responsibility, or who were proved to be unsuitable to care for the children. “Not at those who wish to maintain their responsibilities related to raising their own children,” he said. Mr McCoskrie said there was an issue with parents going overseas and avoiding their responsibilities, and children were the “ultimate losers” in this. Figures from 2008 showed nearly 13,000 liable parents lived overseas, yet this group owed one-third of the total debt.http://www.bayofplentytimes.co.nz/news/31m-owed-to-children/1387275/last_img read more

Pastors pile pressure on MP over gay marriage bill

first_imgNZ Herald 28 Aug 2012Labour MP Louisa Wall has come under intense pressure in her own electorate, with a large group of churches issuing a strongly worded warning to drop her bill to legalise same-sex marriage.Twenty-five pastors from South Auckland churches signed a letter to the MP for Manurewa saying they oppose her proposed change to the Marriage Act and want it withdrawn.“Over the last decade the Labour Party has passed laws that have weakened the family unit and angered their traditional supporters. This proposed bill would be another blow,” the letter said.The South Auckland electorates of Manurewa, Mangere and Manukau East are heartland Labour territory, and the party’s MP for Mangere, Su’a William Sio, has already said he will vote against the bill.http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10829924READ the full letterlast_img read more