Houstons Weather Means Animal Overpopulation Is A YearRound Problem

first_imgWhile it might not feel like it in January, Greg Damianoff says Houston’s warm weather and mild winters contribute to the city’s stray animal problem.“Our problem is year-round because of the climate,” he said. “Animals can eat, drink, and procreate year round.”Damianoff is the director of BARC, the City of Houston’s animal shelter and adoption facility. He says his department takes in between about 26,000 and 27,000 animals each year. And the problem continues to grow as the city’s population does the same.“It’s the same story as always – it’s irresponsible pet ownership that puts us in this situation to begin with,” Damianoff said.He adds that if people were to license their pets, spay or neuter them, and adhere to the number of animals they’re allowed to have by law, then the problem wouldn’t be so substantial.In the audio above, Damianoff updates Houston Matters on the latest efforts to address the city’s stray animal population. And Salise Shuttlesworth, founder and executive director of the no-kill animal shelter Friends for Life, talks about how organizations like hers partner with the city to address this issue. 00:00 /15:02 To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Xcenter_img Listen Photo provided by Harris County Public HealthThe Harris County Animal Shelter. Sharelast_img read more

Haier Exhibits A Wireless HDTV Video System at the 2010 CES w

first_img © 2010 PhysOrg.com Explore further 2010 CES: Haier features the “completely wireless HDTV” ABI Research (Technology Market Research Company) said last year it expected 1 million installations will be performed by 2012. Currently WHDI is supported by 40 vendors, including Broadcom, LG, Intel, NEC, Panasonic, Samsung, Sony, Philips and Toshiba. In 2010 and beyond we can expect to see manufactures experimenting with different wireless technology. Until consumers start seeing the sets in stores, it’s difficult to determine which manufactures will have the most innovative wire free HDTV’s on the market. Intel, Microsoft, Dell band together for WiGig By using a coil that is approximately 1 foot by 1 foot in size, at the back of the TV set, 100 watts of electricity can be supplied at a distance up to 1 meter (3.28 feet). TV images are displayed by using WHDI (Wireless Home Digital Interface), a high-speed communication standard for wirelessly transmitting high-definition images. This leaves the back of the TV completely wire free. The WHDI uses a frequency band of 5 GHz which is the industry standard for WHDI technology developed by Amimon Ltd. By utilizing a bandwidth of 40 MHz, data rates up to 3 Gbps can be transmitted to transfer uncompressed 1080p 60Hz video to the TV; the maximum transmission range is one hundred feet.The wireless power transfer technology, utilizing magnetic coupling, was developed by WiTricity Corp, a US base venture firm that was founded by an MIT professor in April 2007. Electricity is transferred through the use of two resonant devices of the same frequency. This enables the maximum power to be transferred. center_img Citation: Haier Exhibits A Wireless HDTV Video System at the 2010 CES (w/ Video) (2010, January 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-01-haier-wireless-hdtv-video-ces.html (PhysOrg.com) — Haier America Digital Products Group (Chinese company) demonstrated the first completely wireless 32 inch LCD TV that is powered wirelessly up to a distance of 1 meter (3.28 feet). Wireless content is transferred by a system called Wireless Home Digital Interface (WHDI). Using a 5GHz frequency band it can transfer uncompressed 1080p 60Hz video to the TV. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Best of Last Week – Dark matter acting like pions changes to

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org)—It was an interesting week for physics as a team made up of international researchers came up with a new theory that says dark matter acts like a well-known particle—they suggest it has similarities to pions, which bind atomic nuclei together. Also, a macroscopic quantum phenomena was discovered in ice by a team of researchers in China—at very cold temperatures the ice behaved in a way that could only be explained by quantum tunneling, a rare example of quantum phenomena emerging on a macroscopic scale. In other technology news, a team with Escape Dynamics conducted tests with a thruster that showed that using microwaves to propel a craft into space might work, which could mean the end of multi-stage rockets that use propellants. Also a young scientist discovered that magnetic material is unnecessary to create spin current—postdoce researcher Stephen Wu made the discovery while working at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory. Also, interestingly, a team of researches looking into reports of astronauts’ skin changing before and after missions, discovered that for at least two men, their epidermis grew thinner during their mission by 20 percent—though it is still unclear why that happens.In other news, a team of scientists proposed 3D graphene-like ‘hyper-honeycomb’ structures—the group with the University of Oklahoma believes they could make up a new family of 3D based graphene materials. Also, another team at the University of St Andrews in Scotland fed white blood cells micro-lasers causing them to produce light—the hope is that it will allow for tracking cells as they move through living organisms. Another team looked into how music alters the teenage brain and found that training, even as late as high school, can improve teen response to sound and improved hearing and language skills. And another international team of researchers asked, why do mitochondria retain their own genome? They still cannot say for sure, but they conducted tests looking to see if the mitochondrial genome encodes membrane proteins that are hydrophobic—if encoded in the nucleus, they would be filtered by a signal recognition particle and misdirected into the endoplasmic reticulum. And finally, if you are an expert in your field, you might be more susceptible to alleging knowledge of information that was completely made-up—a team with members from Cornell and Tulane Universities found that self-proclaimed experts are more vulnerable to the illusion of knowledge. Something to keep in mind, perhaps before offering opinions that could come back to haunt you. Explore further Typically when referring to electrical current, an image of electrons moving through a metallic wire is conjured. Using the spin Seebeck effect (SSE), it is possible to create a current of pure spin (a quantum property of electrons related to its magnetic moment) in magnetic insulators. However, this work demonstrates that the SSE is not limited to magnetic insulators but also occurs in a class of materials known as paramagnets. Since magnetic moments within paramagnets do not interact with each other like in conventional ferromagnets, and thus do not hold their magnetization when an external magnetic field is removed, this discovery is unexpected and challenges current theories for the SSE. New ways of generating spin currents may be important for low-power high-speed spin based computing (spintronics), and is also an area of great fundamental interest. The paramagnetic SSE changes the way we think about thermally driven spintronics, allowing for the creation of new devices and architectures where spin currents are generated without ferromagnetic materials, which have been the centerpiece of all spin-based electronic devices up until this point.center_img Why do mitochondria retain their own genome? © 2015 Phys.org Citation: Best of Last Week – Dark matter acting like pions, changes to astronaut skin and illusion of knowledge by experts (2015, July 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-07-week-dark-pions-astronaut-skin.htmllast_img read more