Principal Stresses Moral Discipline in Education Standards

first_imgSome of the students of the Mary Sharp Mission School.By Jallah AmosonThe principal of Mary Sharp Memorial Mission School in the Water Side community on UN Drive, Monrovia, Rev. Josiah W. Nimely, has pledged to provide a solid education foundation for students at the school.He said the school’s standards will include moral discipline to prepare students to withstand academic challenges and to uphold societal norms.In an exclusive interview at the school’s campus recently, Nimely said Sharp Memorial was established in 1980 in support of government’s effort to provide Liberian children with quality education and moral discipline.He said he is working closely with parents and guardians of the students to ensure that they monitor their children’s performance and behavior at home and make a report to the school for assistance, if necessary.He said with the quality of administrators and teaching staff  of the school who are also caring and committed, he is hopeful that his school will be able to produce good and disciplined students.Nimely said such students would in the future meaningfully contribute to Liberia’s development. The school was founded by an American evangelist, Mary Sharp, to help prepare children academically and to support Liberia’s education sector.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Lowest Cache on Earth GC1EHNZ GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – January 16, 2011

first_img SharePrint Related”In mezzo agli alberi morti” GC2308M – GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – March 5, 2012March 5, 2012In “Community”Auburn Sea (GC3QGYZ) — Geocache of the WeekSeptember 3, 2015In “Geocache of the Week”Beyond Here, Lay Dragons (GCH52C) – GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – January 17, 2013January 16, 2013In “Community” View of The Dead Sea from new the geocache locationThe sunbaked rocks near the shore of The Dead Sea hide a geocaching adventure. Treasure-hunters trek to a location unlike any other on earth. Geocachers descend 111 meters (364 feet) below sea level  to search for what’s billed as the “Lowest Cache on Earth” (GC1EHNZ).The journey, as geocachers’ GPS devices track closer to the cache coordinates, reveals a scorching desert of shepherd tending flocks, palm trees and wiry brush.The cache is hidden on the Jordan side of  The Dead Sea. The cache owner Limbo placed the small tradition cache in 2008 at an ideal vantage point. Limbo writes on the cache page, “After you find it, find a place to sit and enjoy the great view of the Dead Sea.”Geocachers from around the world have logged smileys on the cache. One writes, “Given the altitude of this one, I really wanted to pick it up. My driver was pretty interested in the idea and accompanied me across from the parking spot to GZ, and was suitably impressed when I walked straight to the cache and voila! I signed the log while he sorted through the stash, and then it was back to the car to escape the ridiculous heat. They both reckon it was about 50 degrees Celsius [122 F] out here today.”Geocachers log smileys on the cacheIf you’re in the neighborhood in March, and can stand the heat, you could also log an Event Cache. “Meet & Greet @ the Lowest Point on Earth” (GC3AC47) is scheduled for March 3, 2012. It’s within a few kilometers of the “Lowest Cache on Earth.”Cache container for “Lowest Cache on Earth”Continue to explore of some of the most engaging geocaches around the globe. Explore all the Geocaches of the Week on the Latitude 47 blog or view the Bookmark List on Geocaching.com. If you’ d like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, send an email with your name, comments, the name of the geocache, and the GC code to pr@groundspeak.com.Share with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

Head Injury Kills Indy Driver Wilson

first_imgIndyCar driver Justin Wilson died Aug. 24 from a head injury suffered when a piece of debris struck him at Pocono Raceway. He was 37.IndyCar made the announcement at Indianapolis Motor Speedway.Wilson, a British driver who lived outside Denver in Longmont, Colorado, was hit in the head during the Aug. 23 race by piece of debris that had broken off another car.Wilson’s car veered into an interior wall at the track, and he was swiftly taken by helicopter to a hospital in Allentown, Pennsylvania.“Can’t even begin to describe the loss I feel right now. He was my Brother, my best friend, my role model and mentor. He was a champion!” his younger brother, Stefan, also an IndyCar driver, tweeted. Stefan Wilson said his brother’s organs would be donated.The last IndyCar driver to die from an on-track incident was Indianapolis 500 champion Dan Wheldon, who was killed in the 2011 season finale at Las Vegas after his head hit a post in the fence when his car went airborne.After Wheldon’s death, Wilson became one of three driver representatives to serve as a liaison between the competitors and IndyCar. It was no surprise: The 6-foot-4 Wilson, easily the tallest in the series, was well liked.“Justin’s elite ability to drive a race car was matched by his unwavering kindness, character and humility — which is what made him one of the most respected members of the paddock,” said Mark Miles, CEO of Hulman & Co., the parent company of IndyCar and Indianapolis Motor Speedway.Wilson won seven times over 12 seasons in open-wheel racing and finished as high as fifth in the Indianapolis 500. An acclaimed sports car racer, Wilson won the prestigious 24 Hours of Daytona with Michael Shank Racing, and he competed in 20 Formula One races in 2003 before moving to the U.S. to join Champ Car.He finished third in the Champ Car standings in 2005, and was runner-up in both 2006 and 2007. To support his career, his management team in 2003 created a program that allowed fans to invest in the driver. Hundreds of people bought shares in Wilson, who was dyslexic and a strong supporter of foundations related to the disorder.Wilson, a native of Sheffield, England, entered this season without a full-time ride. He latched on with Andretti Autosport and was in the sixth of seven scheduled races with the team.The agreement began as a two-race deal for events at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, and then was increased to the final five races of the year. The IndyCar season concludes Aug. 30 in Sonoma, California.Andretti Autosport called Wilson “a tremendous racer, a valuable member of the team and respected representative to our sport.”“While Justin was only part of the Andretti lineup for a short time, it only took a second for him to forever become part of the Andretti family,” the team said.“His life and racing career is a story of class and passion surpassed by none. Our thoughts and prayers remain with the Wilson family and fans worldwide. Godspeed, JW.”Wilson finished a season-best second at Mid-Ohio in early August. He said after the race that he raced clean and did not take any risks that would have jeopardized eventual race-winner Graham Rahal because Rahal was part of the championship race and Wilson was not.“Anyone who follows our sport knows Justin was one of the most well-respected, highly regarded and loved people in the entire paddock,” said Miles, who passed on the Wilsons’ gratitude to the IndyCar safety team and medical staffs of the series, Pocono Raceway and the hospital in Allentown.The family also was grateful to the entire motorsports industry.“Particularly the Wilson family wishes to thank Justin’s fellow drivers, and their families, who have been so thoughtful, and kind, and supportive,” Miles said.Ed Carpenter, the only driver/owner in IndyCar and the stepson of IndyCar founder Tony George Jr., attended the announcement and spoke of the respect Wilson had throughout the paddock.“Days like this are extremely hard on all of us,” Carpenter said. “Justin was a great professional driver and extremely good at his craft. Beyond that, he was a great guy. One of the few, if only, guys who really was a friend of everyone in the paddock. Everyone respected him for the way he carried himself.”Wilson broke a bone in his back at Mid-Ohio in 2011. He missed the final six races of the season and wore a back brace for more than two months while he was restricted from any physical activity.The injury kept him out of the season finale at Las Vegas, the race where Wheldon died. He also broke his pelvis and suffered a bruised lung in the 2013 season finale at Fontana.Wilson once said that his injuries and Wheldon’s death did nothing to change his perspective or make him question his career choice.“You’ve got to know the risks and work out if those risks are acceptable,” Wilson told The Associated Press upon his return to racing in 2012.“To me, it’s acceptable. But I’m not going to stop trying to improve it. All the drivers, this IndyCar, we’re always trying to make it safer, but at the end of the day, it’s a race car. We’re racing hard, we’re racing IndyCars and it’s fast. When it goes wrong, it can get messy.”In addition to his wife, Julia, Wilson is survived by two daughters, 7 and 5. The family asked for donations to a trust fund for his daughters in lieu of flowers.___By Jenna Fryer, AP Auto Racing Writer. AP Sports Writer Dan Gelston contributed  TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

Health Professionals Trained in Contraceptive Forecasting

first_img The training was recommended in the Contraceptive Logistics Management Information Systems Survey Report, which stipulated the need for healthcare professionals to be engaged in contraceptive forecasting methodologies to facilitate accurate predictions in order to alleviate commodity shortages or “stock-outs”. A total of 120 midwives and public health nurses islandwide recently completed training in contraceptive forecasting, which was provided by the National Family Planning Board (NFPB). A total of 120 midwives and public health nurses islandwide recently completed training in contraceptive forecasting, which was provided by the National Family Planning Board (NFPB).The training was recommended in the Contraceptive Logistics Management Information Systems Survey Report, which stipulated the need for healthcare professionals to be engaged in contraceptive forecasting methodologies to facilitate accurate predictions in order to alleviate commodity shortages or “stock-outs”.The report was drafted following surveys conducted in 2013 and 2015 that indicated the need for training.The NFPB’s Director, Monitoring, Evaluation and Research, Tazhmoye Crawford, said the training, which commenced during the first quarter of the 2017/18 fiscal year, concluded on August 11.According to the NFPB, the exercise has led to notable improvements in record-keeping, storage and forecasting methodologies, and significant reductions in the incidence of contraceptive stock-out or shortages in health centres islandwide.Just under two years ago, reports surfaced of a shortage of contraceptive commodities at some of the island’s government-run health clinics.Studies have cautioned that a consequence of stock-outs is an increase in sexually transmitted infections and unplanned pregnancies.As an accompaniment to the training process and for system strengthening of contraceptive management at the clinic and parish levels, the NFPB has also revised and standardised a family planning register and contraceptive logbook for islandwide distribution, documentation, and monitoring of contraceptive use. Story Highlights Studies have cautioned that a consequence of stock-outs is an increase in sexually transmitted infections and unplanned pregnancies. last_img read more

Rice U researchers ask if biofuels will lead to a drink or

first_imgFacebookTwitterPrintEmailAddThis ShareCONTACT: Franz BrotzenPHONE: 713-348-6775E-MAIL: franz.brotzen@rice.eduRice U. researchers ask if biofuels will lead to a ‘drink or drive’ choice Report weighs balancing biofuels and water resourcesRice University scientists warned that the United States must be careful that the new emphasis on developing biofuels as an alternative to imported oil takes into account potential damage to the nation’s water resources.“The ongoing, rapid growth in biofuels production could have far-reaching environmental and economic repercussions, and it will likely highlight the interdependence and growing tension between energy and water security,” said a report titled “The Water Footprint of Biofuels: A Drink or Drive Issue?”The report, written by Pedro Alvarez, the George R. Brown Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and three colleagues was funded by Rice University’s Shell Center for Sustainability.The researchers asked if increased biofuel-driven agriculture will affect water-resource availability and degrade water quality. They pointed out that fuel crops require large quantities of water and that water pollution is exacerbated by agricultural drainage containing fertilizers, pesticides and sediment. “These potential drawbacks,” which the authors labeled the “water footprint,” must be “balanced by biofuels’ significant potential to ease dependence on foreign oil and improve trade balance while mitigating air pollution and reducing fossil carbon emissions to the atmosphere.”The report analyzed the amount of water needed to grow particular crops used to produce biofuels and noted that certain crops yield more biofuel energy while using less land, fertilizer and water. “Thus, from a water supply perspective,” the authors said, “the ideal fuel crops would be drought-tolerant, high-yield plants grown on little irrigation water.”To demonstrate their point, the authors estimated it takes about 50 gallons of water to produce enough irrigated-corn ethanol in Nebraska to fuel an average car for one mile. Given differing land use practices and other factors, that number decreases to 23 gallons for Iowa-grown corn and rises to 115 gallons for Texas-grown sorghum.The debate over biofuels must also “recognize the impact of increased agricultural activity on water quality as well as water consumption,” the authors said. Raising biofuel crops in some areas will require greater use of fertilizers, with the runoff affecting local aquifers and even coastal regions like the Chesapeake Bay and the Gulf of Mexico, it warned.The report acknowledged that some biofuel sources, like switchgrass and other lignocellulosic options, can “deliver more potential biofuel energy with lower requirements for agricultural land, agrichemicals and water.” Accordingly, the authors urged that crops be chosen based on their appropriateness to the local climate and that producers raise crops that can be sustained by rainfall rather than irrigation.The report called on policymakers to evaluate the water footprint as they devise an environmentally sustainable biofuels program. “Through energy conservation and careful planning that includes adoption of agricultural practices and crop choices that reduce water consumption and mitigate water pollution from agrichemicals, and identification of the local and regional water resources that will be needed to meet the biofuel mandate,” the authors said, “we can have our drive and drink our water too.” The report was supported by a fellowship from the Baker Institute Energy Forum and by the Shell Center for Sustainability at Rice University. It is available at   http://cohesion.rice.edu/centersandinst/shellcenter/research.cfm?doc_id=11975Alvarez’s co-authors were Susan Powers, professor of civil and environmental engineering at Clarkson University; Joel Burken, professor of civil, architectural and environmental engineering at Missouri University of Science and Technology; and Rosa Dominguez-Faus, a graduate student at Rice. Amy Myers Jaffe, the Wallace S. Wilson Fellow in Energy Studies at the James A. Baker III Institute, also contributed to the report.To speak with Alvarez, contact Franz Brotzen at franz.brotzen@rice.edu or 713-348-6775.last_img read more