Commuters suffer in raindrenched Dhaka

first_imgCommuters suffer in rain-drenched Dhaka. Photo: Abdus SalamHeavy rains on Monday morning crippled life in Dhaka city as most of the roads went under ankle to knee-deep water, causing sufferings to commuters, report news agency UNB.The torrential rains lashed Dhaka leading to waterlogging in many parts of the busy mega-city.The Met office recorded 66 millimeter rainfall in three hours between 6:00am and 9:00am, said Muhammad Arif Hossain, meteorologist of Bangladesh Meteorological Department.During the time, it also recorded 37mm rainfall in Comilla while 9mm in Khunla, 5mm in Tarash of Sirajganj, 2mm in Chandpur.The worst affected areas in Dhaka include Mohammadpur, Dhanmondi 27, Karwan Bazar, Sobhanbagh, Panthapath, Greenroad, Fakirapool, Khilgaon, Mauchak, Malibagh, Moghbazar, Motijheel, Paltan, Kazipara, Sukrabad, Shantinagar.Vehicles remained stranded for hours in traffic jams.Hundred of commuters especially office and school goers faced huge troubles in reaching their destinations due to water-logging and lack of transports caused by the incessant rains.Many of them were seen wading through ankle to knee-deep water on the roads and bilanes.The rain may continue till Wednesday and even Thursday, meteorologist Arif added.Commuters faced difficulties due to water-logg8ing in Mauchak, Malibagh, Shatinagar and some other areas, said victims.The situation turned worse in areas like Malibagh Chowdhurypara, Mauchak for pothole-riddled road, said Ferdous Koni, a commuter from Malibagh.According to heavy rainfall warning of the Met office, under the influence of active monsoon over Bangladesh heavy (44mm – 88mm) to very heavy (>=89mm) rainfall is likely to occur at places over Rajshahi, Mymensingh, Dhaka, Barisal, Chittagong and Sylhet divisions during next 24 hours commencing 9:00 am Monday.Due to very heavy rainfall landslide may occur at places over the hilly regions of Chittagong and Sylhet divisions.last_img read more

What next for Brexit

first_imgBritain`s Prime Minister Theresa May leaves 10 Downing Street in central London on December 12, 2018 ahead of the weekly question and answer session, Prime Ministers Questions (PMQs), in the House of Commons. British Prime Minister Theresa May was hit by a no-confidence motion by her own party on December 12 over the unpopular Brexit deal she struck with EU leaders last month. Facing her biggest crisis since assuming office a month after Britons voted in June 2016 to leave Europe, May vowed to fight the coup attempt inside her own Conservative Party `with everything I`ve got`. AFPWhat happens to the Brexit process now, as prime minister Theresa May fights a challenge to her leadership?The embattled leader toured European capitals on Tuesday in an attempt to seek concessions on her Brexit deal, less than four months before the March 29 date when Britain is set to leave the European Union.But the EU has vowed not to budge, and she came home to a potential leadership challenge.She said she will contest Wednesday’s challenge and, if victorious, plans to table a vote on her Brexit deal some time before January 21.If she loses, the leadership election could take days or even weeks into the New Year and could potentially derail the Brexit timetable.Here are some of the most probable scenarios:- Tweaks to the deal -Victory for May over her rebel MPs will mean she cannot face another no-confidence challenge from within her party for 12 months, giving her some breathing space as she attempts to tweak her deal and get it through parliament.May held talks with European counterparts on Tuesday seeking “further assurances” over the so-called “backstop plan” for the Irish border as she attempts to drum up support for her deal.She will meet with EU leaders to discuss Brexit during a summit in Brussels on Thursday.European sources privately say only clarifications or tweaks in the accompanying declaration on post-Brexit ties might be possible.But that could be enough to sway MPs, particularly if the extended uncertainty takes a disastrous toll on the economy and financial markets.- Norway option -If her deal is rejected, MPs are set to take more control over the whole process. They could push for a “plan B”, which would see Britain adopt a softer Brexit, such as staying in the EU’s satellite trading bloc the European Economic Area — the so-called Norway option.Although being in the single market would require maintaining freedom of movement of EU citizens into Britain — a contentious issue for pro-Brexit voters — this approach is considered more likely to command a majority in parliament and potentially pass a vote.Another potential obstacle, however, is that Britain would have to continue paying large amounts of money into the EU budget, which would prove hugely unpopular.- No-deal Brexit -Britain has legislated to leave the European Union on March 29, 2019, after triggering Article 50 — the treaty mechanism used to exit the bloc — two years prior.May has warned that if MPs vote down her plan the country risks crashing out on this date with no agreement.That would sever ties overnight with Britain’s closest trading partner, amid fears of grounded flights, medicine shortages and gridlocked ports and motorways.If May loses Wednesday’s vote, most of the favourites to replace her are pro-Brexit, increasing the chances that Britain would leave without a deal.- Second referendum -Calls for a new referendum now attract cross-party support from dozens of MPs.May has repeatedly ruled out another vote, but could face pressure to call one if Britain slips into political paralysis.Supporters of a second referendum received a boost from the European Court of Justice on Monday, which ruled that Britain has the unilateral right to revoke its Brexit decision.It could take weeks to elect a new leader if May is deposed, and Justice Secretary David Gauke warned on Wednesday that this could lead to the deadline being extended.- General election -The prime minister could try to break the parliamentary deadlock by calling a general election — but would need the backing of two-thirds of all MPs.Even if she survives Wednesday’s party vote, a simple majority of all lawmakers could also topple her government with a vote of no confidence, with some opposition MPs on Monday calling for such a move in parliament.But a Labour spokesperson said that the party would only submit such a motion “when we judge it most likely to be successful”.Losing a confidence vote tabled by the opposition could lead to the formation of a new government — possibly a coalition of parties with a new leader — if MPs agreed on it within two weeks.Otherwise, a general election would be called.last_img

Major Traffic Delays This Weekend I45 Totally Shut Down In Downtown Houston

first_img Share Listen 00:00 /02:11 Oversized trucks hitting bridges is nothing new around Houston. One of the most recent incidents happened in September when a truck hit the West Dallas bridge over I-45. It’s been under a load limit ever since. Instead of repairing the bridge, TxDOT’s Danny Perez says they decided to go ahead and replace it.“We’re raising it approximately 13 to 14 inches,” explains Perez. “It’ll have the same footprint as the current bridge that is out there now, which will include the same lane widths and the same sidewalk width.”As for why they’re closing I-45 to do that work, Perez says they want to complete the project quickly. He says if they did partial lane closures it would take a lot longer. “We’ll be able to place the beams and pour the concrete deck,” says Perez. “It’s a process that could sometimes take months. But in this case we’re doing it over a series of weekends. So we want to get it done quick and make sure we’re out of there just in time for the Super Bowl coming up.”Weather permitting, TxDOT also plans to close I-45 on the weekends of November 18-21, December 2-5, and December 9-12. The plan is to reopen the West Dallas bridge by late December or early January. New entrance ramps from Allen Parkway and Houston Avenue are expected to open at the same time.  So what do drivers need to know this weekend?  All main lanes of I-45 will close at 9:00 PM Friday between I-10 and U.S. 59. If you’re traveling northbound, you’ll be detoured to U.S. 59 northbound to I-10 westbound to re-enter I-45. If you’re southbound, you’ll be detoured to I-10 eastbound to U.S. 59 southbound and then back to I-45.   Xcenter_img To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: – / 5last_img read more

After A Day Of Legal Shock And Awe Whats Next For The

first_imgAlex Wong/Getty ImagesSpecial counsel Robert Mueller (left) arrives at the U.S. Capitol for closed meeting with members of the Senate Judiciary Committee on June 21 in Washington, D.C.Five months into his mandate, Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller III unleashed a legal version of “shock and awe” on Monday with criminal charges against President Trump’s former campaign chairman and a guilty plea by a foreign policy aide.Mueller made no public comment about the charges or the next steps in an investigation that’s irritating the White House and riveting the nation. But there are some clues in the court documents about where the former FBI director and his investigators may be heading.1. The Foreign Agents Registration ActAmong the charges facing former campaign chairman Paul Manafort and his right-hand man Richard Gates is failing to register as agents of a foreign government, and making false and misleading statements about that. The grand jury indictment unsealed Monday accuses the men of working on behalf of Ukraine and telling the Justice Department their activities “did not include meetings or outreach within the U.S.”Those charges are controversial, in part because violations of the Foreign Agents Registration Act are rarely enforced. Kevin Downing, a lawyer for Manafort, told reporters outside the courthouse that prosecutors have used that “very novel” charge only six times since 1966, winning just one conviction.On Capitol Hill, however, Senate Republican Charles Grassley of Iowa offered praise for that approach: “It’s good to see the Justice Department taking seriously its responsibility to enforce” the law, Grassley said in a written statement.“I’ve been raising concerns about lackluster enforcement of this foreign influence disclosure law for years now, regardless of administration or political party,” he added. “The dirty little secret is that lots of people across the political spectrum in Washington have skirted their FARA obligations for years now with little to no accountability.”Grassley convened an oversight hearing on the issue in July, flagging work by Mercury LLC and the Podesta Group on behalf of what he calls “a front for the Ukrainian government.” The firms are mentioned in the indictment as “Company A” and “Company B.” A prominent Democratic lobbyist, Tony Podesta, announced he would step down from that firm Monday after the charges became public.At least one other person with ties to the Trump campaign, former national security adviser Michael Flynn, belatedly filed a foreign agent registration with the Justice Department this year connected with his work on behalf of Turkey. He has not been charged with a crime.2. Will Manafort fight?Despite an onslaught of pressure from federal investigators, including an FBI raid on his residence in July, Manafort has steadfastly denied wrongdoing, and people close to Manafort say he has little of use to offer the special counsel.Even so, the 31-page indictment suggests that federal investigators are not finished squeezing him. Authorities want to seize Manafort’s properties in New York and Virginia, at a time when he’s already strapped for cash. The court papers refer to business dealings with Manafort’s daughter and son-in-law, who have not been publicly charged with any crimes.And the Manafort indictment doesn’t refer to contacts between Manafort and Russians with close ties to Vladimir Putin, despite media reports that he emailed with a longtime Ukrainian client in Putin’s camp to offer private briefings on the election.3. Fallout from the Papadopoulos pleaThe guilty plea by George Papadopoulos, a 30-year-old former foreign policy adviser to the Trump campaign, detailed a series of contacts he had with people close to the Russian government in 2016. The court documents said Papadopoulos reported his conversations to a “supervisor” and “high-ranking” members of the campaign team.Investigators said that after his secret arrest in July, Papadopoulos has been meeting with the government “on numerous occasions to provide information and answer questions.”The message: He may be offering evidence against others still under investigation. Other people inside the Trump campaign also are said to have received overtures from Russians or Russian agents at about the same time that Trump named Papadopoulos as an adviser. One of them, Carter Page, traveled to Moscow at least twice last year.Thomas Breen and Robert Stanley, lawyers for Papadopoulos, said they had to refrain from comment on the case for now. But, they added, “We will have the opportunity to comment on George’s involvement when called upon by the court at a later date. We look forward to telling all of the details of George’s story at that time.”4. Will Mueller keep his job?Congressional Democrats reacted quickly after the indictments to insist that the independence of special counsel Mueller and his team must be protected. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said the rule of law is “paramount.”“The president must not, under any circumstances, interfere with the special counsel’s work in any way,” Schumer added. “If he does so, Congress must respond swiftly, unequivocally, and in a bipartisan way to ensure that the investigation continues.”At the White House, press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said there was “no intention or plan to make any changes in regards to the special counsel.”Trump lawyer Jay Sekulow told CNN he’s had no conversations with Trump about issuing pardons for Manafort or others implicated in the Russia investigation.But Mueller could charge more people in Trump’s world and bring even more heat onto the president’s camp — which might prompt Trump to revise his thinking about trying to get rid of the special counsel.And legal experts say they don’t know what might happen if Trump exercises his sweeping power to pardon people in a way that obstructs the Mueller probe.Copyright 2017 NPR. 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500 Forward Bloc supporters join Trinamool Congress in Cooch Behar

first_imgMekhligunj: Five hundred Forward Bloc supporters joined Trinamool Congress at a function here on Sunday afternoon.Rabindranath Ghosh, Trinamool Congress president of Cooch Behar district and state minister for North Bengal Development, handed over party flags to them.Trinamool Congress held a programme to felicitate Paresh Adhikari, former state Food minister who joined the party from Forward Bloc in Kolkata on August 17. Partha Chatterjee, secretary general of the party, had handed over the party flag in a function at Trinamool Bhavan. Adhikari was the secretary of Cooch Behar district of Forward Bloc.Forward Bloc in Cooch Behar has received a major blow with Adhikari’s joining. He is a good organiser and is popular among the youth. His joining will strengthen the base of Trinamool Congress in the district, party leaders said.last_img read more