OCA Says Behaviour Change Critical to Eliminate Corporal Punishment

first_img Children’s Advocate, Diahann Gordon Harrison, says the OCA views corporal punishment as “inflicting a form of violence against children”, noting that there are alternatives to curbing indiscipline. The Office of the Children’s Advocate (OCA) says a cultural shift, as well as behaviour change, is critical to eliminating corporal punishment in Jamaica. Story Highlightscenter_img The Office of the Children’s Advocate (OCA) says a cultural shift, as well as behaviour change, is critical to eliminating corporal punishment in Jamaica.Children’s Advocate, Diahann Gordon Harrison, says the OCA views corporal punishment as “inflicting a form of violence against children”, noting that there are alternatives to curbing indiscipline.She was speaking to journalists following the opening of the Second Regional Caribbean Conference of the International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect (ISPCAN), at the Hilton Rose Hall Hotel in Montego Bay, St. James, on December 2.“The position of the Office of the Children’s Advocate is that corporal punishment is a form of violence, and I wish to be very clear to say that we aren’t against disciplining children, but we don’t think that corporal punishment is the only form of discipline that exists. It’s about being creative and using methods that actually work with encouraging children to pattern positive behaviour and to deal with issues in a very reasonable and measured way,” she argued.In the meantime, Mrs. Gordon Harrison, who is also National Rapporteur on Trafficking in Persons for Jamaica, said the regional conference provides a unique opportunity to advance agendas that will, ultimately, redound to the protection of children internationally.The ISPCAN conference, which ends on Wednesday (December 5), is being held in partnership with the OCA, under the theme, ‘Child Protection Realities within a Changing Caribbean and World’.Other countries participating in the event include Switzerland, Ireland, the United Kingdom, Canada and the United States (US).ISPCAN is the world’s premier society for professionals working to prevent child abuse and child neglect.last_img read more

Update standoff ends in Poway

first_img KUSI Newsroom, 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsPOWAY (KUSI) – An hours-long standoff ended Sunday afternoon after a man barricaded himself in a Poway building for much of the morning and early afternoon.The standoff was taking place at an apartment attached to a business on the 14000 block of Poway Road.The road was blocked off between Garden Road and Sudan Road. Authorities confirmed that no one was in danger.The Sheriff’s Department said SWAT and crisis negotiation teams were at the scene. The department also urged media and others not to post pictures or video that could endanger deputies.“Please do not put the lives of deputies at risk by posting video or photos of their positions LIVE on TV, web or social media during the incident,” the department said.Sheriff Lt. Dave Perkins confirmed that the  standoff had ended by about 1 p.m. No details on how the situation was resolved or identifying information on the suspect was immediately available. Posted: February 17, 2019 Updated: 6:30 PM February 17, 2019center_img Update: standoff ends in Poway KUSI Newsroom Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

House Votes to Remove Immigration Measure from Defense Bill

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR House lawmakers on Thursday voted to strip a controversial immigration provision from the fiscal 2016 defense authorization bill, removing one possible barrier to the measure’s passage this week.Language added to the defense policy bill in committee last month would have encouraged the defense secretary to consider allowing individuals eligible for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program to serve in the military. The provision drew heated opposition from conservatives who tried to have it stricken from the bill by the House Rules Committee. Instead, lawmakers adopted an amendment, 221-202, removing the language.Debate over the amendment took place during the first series of votes on amendments Thursday, reported CQ Roll Call. Debate continued into Thursday night, with the House aiming to vote on the underlying legislation Friday.Lawmakers rejected an amendment that would change the statutory requirement for the number of operational aircraft carriers the Navy must maintain from 11 to 10.“Now that’s an arbitrary, restrictive requirement,” said Rep. Jared Polis (R-Colo.), who offered the amendment. “Perhaps they should have more. Perhaps they should have less.”Senior Armed Services members of both parties, including Seapower Subcommittee Chairman Randy Forbes (R-Va.) and the panel’s ranking Democrat, Joe Courtney (Conn.), opposed the proposal.last_img read more

Exclusive Chad Hugo On NERD Finding His Musical Freedom

first_imgFrom The Neptunes to N.E.R.D. and beyond, the GRAMMY-winning musician and producer taps into what makes his music magicalPaul ZolloGRAMMYs Aug 13, 2018 – 10:51 am Chad Hugo is a musician first. He’s become famous for not wanting to be famous, preferring to let superstar friends such as longtime musical partner Pharrell Williams, or Jay-Z or Justin Timberlake, stand in the spotlight, while he stayed in the studio fine-tuning their tracks.Through a career as a producer, as well as member of his own band, N.E.R.D., Hugo has always focused on always keeping his records vital and fresh. For years he did this using the same digital toolbox everyone used until he realized what was missing was the soulful authority achieved only when real musicians play in real time. The dimension of human artistry real musicians can bring to a track is undeniable and can’t be attained in any other way.  We spoke to Hugo about that revelation, and other ideas which have informed his remarkable career.His story starts in Virginia Beach, Virginia, where music first enlivened his world. He was only 12 when he met Williams in the school marching band. They both were drummers, but Hugo was the Drum Major, the leader of the band, while his friend was behind him in the drumline. In time, as the world knows, Williams happily stepped into the frontman role as Hugo held it down in the back.It was over beatboxes though, not snare drums, that they bonded. Forming a duo called The Neptunes, they got signed to a production deal by Teddy Riley, who heard them at the school talent show. For nearly a decade they produced other artists, before starting their own band, N.E.R.D. (No-one Ever Really Dies), with Shay Haley.They created their debut, In Search Of, as they did their previous productions, with digital drum beats, samples and loops. They released it first in Europe before agreeing to reinvent the album with a slant both old school and new, fusing mechanical beats and samples with actual instruments in real time. They enlisted Spymob, a rock band, to do the playing since they felt they couldn’t. But by their next album, Fly or Die, they did it all. With incessant woodshedding, Hugo gradually grew more fluent on guitar and branched out in many directions, to saxophones, accordion, keyboards and more. Williams played the drums.“It’s not mandatory,” Hugo says, when asked how important a mastery of real instruments was to a modern producer. “But learning different instruments allows one to take on another voice, another character. I also joined the choir at church and to sing a given song on paper, a composition, and contribute to make the message stronger is something to appreciate.”N.E.R.D. have banded and disbanded a few times, but now they are about to embark on a major tour. Being an artist in the band instead of the producer is a role he relishes, as its liberates him to make the music most singular to his own spirit.For his most recent production, working with Justin Timberlake on his Out of The Woods album, his mission was not to express his own soul, but to enable the artist to express his soul while devising the perfect frame.But when allowed to do his own thing, he’s freed from other perspectives to honor his own. “In No-one Ever Really Dies,” he says, “we were given the freedom to set the trends.” Hugo has always been a collaborator since the start, and it’s working with others, he explained, that creates the sturdy and friendly foundation that he needs. “Making music is best as a team effort,” he said, “so I’d add elements and take out elements. To be trusted on my judgements, that took time. That’s in a mix down, and during the songwriting process.”That organic foundation still grounds every production, and always allows experimentation with the newest tools that emerge. “There’s always new technology,” he said, “and plug-ins being released. We share these technologies and implement them in production. Though we still maintain the foundation in the studio setting with the provided drum kit guitar and wind instruments.”  Being an authentic musician, Hugo knows, is all about being engaged. But as he explained, that engagement isn’t exclusive only to one’s work writing or recording a song.  To create engaged art, he said, means being engaged not only with music, but with all of life. Asked to explain his own creative process and how he maintains that dynamic connection, he pointed not towards the studio but towards being a human: “Live life to the fullest,” he said. No more words were needed or offered; it was time to get back to the music.Chad Hugo is a member of the Recording Academy and can be seen in the Academy’s We Are Music campaign.Catching Up On Music News Powered By The Recording Academy Just Got Easier. Have A Google Home Device? “Talk To GRAMMYs”Read more Exclusive: Chad Hugo On Finding Freedom In Music exclusive-chad-hugo-nerd-finding-his-musical-freedom Exclusive: Chad Hugo On N.E.R.D. & Finding His Musical Freedom Facebook Twitter News Email last_img read more

Tom Walker On What A Time To Be Alive Music As Therapy

first_imgWe caught up with Walker at our Santa Monica, Calif. headquarters to learn more about his upcoming album, how songwriting helps him work through lives challenges, his favorite venue he’s played at, and more.Your debut album What a Time to be Alive comes out soon, October 19th. How are you feeling about putting that out into the world?I’m happy, it’s cool. I’ve been working on it for ages and ages. It feels like it’s in a really good place. The songs are just really strong and I’ve picked up, I think I’ve picked up of like 120 songs, I picked 11. Its 45 minutes of music. Spent ages getting the track list. I know people listen to a lot of stuff on streaming and don’t listen to albums as much these days, but to me, a proper artist has a proper album. I wanted to make sure the flow and the mix of everything, the continuity, was all one thing and it was fluid and I feel like I’ve gotten there. We’ve been a bit pushed for time because we’ve had 150 gigs this year. If I’ve not been out on the road, I’ve been in the studio and it’s just been back and forth and back and forth, crazy. I’m really excited and I’m really happy, which I didn’t think I’d be, I thought I’d be super nervous, but I feel like I’m ready to put it out into the world and see what everybody thinks.How do you feel working on this album versus your EP that you came out with; how is the creative process different?With this album, I went with three different producers. I worked with Jim Abbiss who I made the Blessings EP with, Steve Mark who I did two of the singles with and Mike Spencer who I’ve done a couple of the singles and some of the album tracks. It’s a really amazing opportunity and quite rare to work with three producers of that caliber, at this stage in your career, when you’ve had one big song out. You know what I mean? It was such a cool experience and all three are really different and really unique in their own ways and brought the best out of me in a few different ways. It was really cool. I love being in studio, I really enjoy it. I’m a bit of a studio guy, if I’m not out on tour, I wanna be in the studio. As soon as I’m in the studio for too long, I wanna be out on tour. It’s been a good balance, doing that for the whole album. It feels good.Speaking of hit single, “Leave a Light On” is very emotionally stirring and has caught the attention of a lot of people worldwide. I read that it was about real people in your life. How has songwriting helped you process things that you’ve gone through in life? Have you gotten feedback from fans that your music has also helped them?I feel like songwriting, for me, is kind of therapy. If I do have issues and I do have troubles, the best way to work it out is to write a song about it. I think you mentally just internalize the problem and somehow, you just get through it a little quicker. That’s for me, that’s probably why I’m a songwriter, you know? It’s not gonna work for everybody. I just find, putting it on paper really helps it. And “Leave A Light On” in particular is about a friend of mine, who kind of had a bit of an addiction problem. I had messages from people all over the world saying they had a brother or a sister or a parent or a friend or anybody who’s gone through a similar thing and this song’s helped them get through something and when I wrote it, I never really expected that. It’s been a really cool side effect of writing the song. Other people have had issues and it’s helped them through it. It’s kind of cool that music does that. I never really thought of that when I wrote it. I didn’t expect the reaction that it got, it’s cool.I’ve had a few people come up to me as well and tell me some pretty tragic, heartbreaking stories. It’s always nice to meet people who’ve had their own experiences with the song and got through something pretty tough. Makes you feel good about what you’re doing. Because I think the music industry can feel a little selfish sometimes, like everything’s about you, but it’s nice to actually be helping some people through some stuff.You mentioned that you’ve been touring a lot. You’re finishing up your tour in the U.S., you’ve played Glastonbury – what’s your favorite show that you’ve played so far?Favorite show? There’s been loads this year. I think Coco in London. I was so nervous cause it was the biggest venue we’d ever played in London and we sold it out super quickly. All of the label and all of my publishers and everybody came down, all my friends who I wrote the songs with and producers that I worked with, everybody was there. It was super nerve-racking, but it was amazing.Glastonbury was special as well because I finished by set, which I could only do acoustically, I couldn’t even get tickets for the band. I basically got offered the slot because I already bought a ticket for the festival. I didn’t have any help with my gear but this little trailer and had my guitar amplifier and my acoustic, I was lugging it through Glastonbury.It took an hour and an half to get it from my car to the stage, and then from the stage back to the car, another hour and an half. So like three hours for the day, just getting there and back. I did the set and it was amazing, the tent was full, which I couldn’t believe because there’s so many amazing artists playing at Glastonbury, I was like, “Well, nobody’s gonna come and fill this tent up”, but they did and it was great. Then as soon as I came out and finished my set, Elbow, which is like one of my favorite bands, were doing a secret set on the stage right there. So, I literally finished, put my gear away, came out, and they started their show and I just sat and watched it. I was like, how cool is this? I just finished my first set at Glastonbury and then I’ve come out and I’ve watched one of my favorite bands play a secret gig. That was pretty special. News Tom Walker On ‘What A Time To Be Alive,’ Music As Therapy & More Facebook The singer/songwriter tells us about his upcoming debut album, how songwriting is a therapeutic process for him, what it was like to play Glastonbury, and moreAna YglesiasGRAMMYs Sep 14, 2018 – 12:24 pm U.K.-based singer/songwriter Tom Walker’s debut full-length album What a Time to Be Alive is coming out on Oct. 19, and he’s pretty thrilled about it. A single he released last year “Leave a Light On,” a touching, emotionally-charged track that he wrote about a friend dealing with a substance problem, has already gained him an international following.It is clear that music has been Walker’s lifeblood since his early days listening to Michael Jackson’s Thriller on this dad’s record player as a kid, and that he is ecstatic to be sharing his passion—his music—with the world. Twitter NETWORK ERRORCannot Contact ServerRELOAD YOUR SCREEN OR TRY SELECTING A DIFFERENT VIDEO Sep 14, 2018 – 11:46 am Singer/songwriter Tom Walker On Music As Therapy https://twitter.com/IamTomWalker/status/1039872093637079040 Email Tom Walker On Music As Therapy & More tom-walker-what-time-be-alive-music-therapy-more I heard Thriller was one of your favorite albums growing up, and perhaps still is?Yeah, I don’t listen to it as much these days, but it’s the first thing I remember ever hearing on vinyl. My dad had a pretty cool stereo at the time. My sister, unfortunately blew it up at a house party. Thriller was one of the first things I can remember dancing to around the living room, as a kid to and just being really scared, you know all the sounds effects that they put in that song and the speech at the end of it. It was really frightening when you were a kid. I just thought that was really cool.Growing up listening to music, did you know that was what you wanted to be an artist, or how did that change as you grew up and started pursuing music? I thought I wanted to be a guitarist, not an artist. I didn’t start singing and writing songs properly until I was 19. I think I was quite late to the party, in that sense. I’ve since made up for it, but I just loved guitar. I was a massive fan of AC/DC, Foo Fighters, Muse – I went to see all of them live. B.B. King, Chuck Berry, I love Ray Charles, I just like a bit of everything. I always was fascinated by music and when I saw my favorite bands doing a live show or seeing them on TV, I just thought “That looks so much fun.” I kind of wanted to pursue some form of that, I didn’t realize I would end up being an artist and being a songwriter and a singer. It just kind of all fell into place naturally, which was nice. I never really forced or didn’t set out to be like “I wanna be famous,” I just wanted to play music.You studied music in college. Do you think the degree helped prepare you for working in the music industry?I think the degree was really interesting because, in England it’s not free to go to university, but they lend you the money. It’s the best loan you’ll ever get. It’s a bit harder now, but when I was doing it at the time, it was fairly easy to get it. It just gave me three years to really focus on songwriting. The degree was good, but I felt there was bits of it that really weren’t that relevant to the industry. It could’ve been better in that sense. It’s an amazing degree, but actually getting into the industry, there was loads of things that they never told or warned us about, but it gave me the time to really build my craft. The songwriting teachers there were amazing. Really helped me with the songwriting, for sure. Also, I had Logic lessons, which really helped me recording and getting to production and stuff like that. The kind of music business side of it wasn’t really there, but the rest of it was great.Is there kind of like a dream collaboration that you have in the near future or?I’d love to write a song with Paolo Nutini. I’ve loved all of his albums so far and I love his voice. He was born in Scotland, I was also born in Scotland. I’ve always wanted to meet him, but he doesn’t really gig or do many shows. I’ve never actually seen him live and he’s one of my favorite artists. Every time I look online, he’s not doing anything. I feel like I’ve missed out. I should’ve gone when he was gigging, but hopefully he’ll come back with an album in another two years after like five years, whatever its been and it’ll be absolutely banging and he’ll go out and do a tour and I might hopefully see him on the circuit one day.The Shadowboxers On Working With Justin Timberlake, Covers & New MusicRead morelast_img read more

Anil Agarwals Volcan Investments shows interest in Jet Airways

first_imgVedanta group Chairman Anil Agarwal during a press conference in Kolkata on Dec 25, 2018.IANSVolcan Investments, the family trust of Vedanta Chairman Anil Agarwal, has shown interest to invest in the now grounded Jet Airways and has submitted an Expression of Interest (EoI) for the debt-ridden airline.”Volcan Investments, an investment company for Anil Agarwal, in an exploratory move, has sought an EoI for Jet Airways, to understand the business scenario for the company and the industry,” the trust said in a statement on Sunday.It, however, added that the EoI is in “no way linked to Vedanta”.The EoIs will be examined by resolution professional Ashish Chhawchharia to verify their eligibility. The final bids are to be submitted by September 12.last_img

Couple 4 others held with yaba

first_imgPolice in a drive arrested six people, including a couple, along with 2,100 pieces of yaba tablets from two houses in Bogura on Sunday, reports UNB.The arrestees are Naimul Hasan Shanta, 25, son of Zahedur Rahman, Shanta’s wife Shimu, 23, Laboni, 28, wife of Nahid Alam, Mariam Akter Nipu, 25, wife of Ashadul Kabir, Monika, 20, wife of Rusho, and Lokman Hossain, 45, son of Abul Kashem of Naogaon district.Tipped off, a team of police conducted a drive at four flats in Jaleshwartoli and Sutrapur areas and arrested them along with the yaba tablets around 10:00am, said Sanatan Chakrawarty, additional superintendent of Bogura police.The arrestees have long been involved in drug trading in rented flats in the town, police claimed.last_img

DUCSU VP Nurul among 20 injured in BCL attack

first_imgAt least 20 people, including VP of Dhaka University Central Students` Union (DUCSU) Nurul Haque, were injured in an attack reportedly by BCL men in the Bogura town on Sunday afternoon.At least 20 people, including vice president (VP) of Dhaka University Central Students’ Union (DUCSU) Nurul Haque Nur, were injured in an attack allegedly by the activists of Bangladesh Chhatra League (BCL) in Bogura on Sunday, reports UNB.BCL is the student wing of ruling Awami League.Witnesses said Bangladesh General Students’ Rights Protection Council organised an iftar party at Woodburn Public Library auditorium where Nurul was supposed to speak as the chief guest.In their apparent bid to foil the iftar party, around 40-50 BCL men, led by Govt Azizul Haque College unit general secretary Abdur Rauf, reportedly took position at the venue and asked for shutting down the programme, alleged convener of the district unit of the council Rakibul Hasan Rakib.DUCSU VP Nurul and his companions reached the venue in a microbus around 5:00pm, he said, adding that as soon as they got down from the vehicle, the BCL activists swooped on them.The attackers punched them and beat them with sticks, Rakib said.They also beat the cameraperson of Jamuna Television Shahnewaz as he was taking footage of the attack, he added.Of the injured, Nurul and several others were sent to Dhaka after providing primary treatment.Rakib said they arranged the iftar party after taking permission from the local administration.Meanwhile, in-charge of Stadium police outpost inspector Mostafiz Hasan said a group of miscreants suddenly launched the attack.Bangladesh General Students’ Rights Protection Council joint convener Faruque Hasan said their several leaders and activists were injured in the attack. “Of them, Nurul’s injuries are severe,” he said, adding that they took primary treatment in Bogura but started for the capital in an ambulance fearing more attacks.No version of local BCL was available immediately in this regard.Nurul, who came under BCL attack several times previously, is a student of English department of Dhaka University and a joint convener of Bangladesh General Students’ Rights Protection Council, which led the protests for reforms in the quota system in government jobs in 2018.He was elected DUCSU VP on 11 March last.last_img

Houston Has Two New Soccer Play Spaces

first_img Share Photo: Houston Parks and Recreation Department via FacebookThe U.S. Soccer Foundation, the Houston Parks and Recreation Department and Target have unveiled two new soccer play spaces at Eastwood Park, located in southeast Houston.The U.S. Soccer Foundation, the Houston Parks and Recreation Department and Target unveiled this week two new soccer play spaces at Eastwood Park, located in southeast Houston.The grand opening marked the first of 100 soccer play spaces that Target has committed to build in collaboration with the U.S. Soccer Foundation across the country by 2020 as part of a program called ‘Safe Places to Play’.The soccer spaces support the Foundation’s ‘It’s Everyone’s Game’ campaign, which aims to ensure children in underserved communities can benefit from playing soccer.“Through soccer, children learn to develop healthier habits, work as a team, and cultivate critical life skills,” Ed Foster-Simeon, President & CEO of the U.S. Soccer Foundation, said in a news release from the Foundation.According to the news release, Target will provide $6 million to support the Foundation’s efforts to turn underutilized spaces into safe and accessible soccer spaces and increase access to sports-based youth programming.last_img read more