Haier Exhibits A Wireless HDTV Video System at the 2010 CES w

first_img © 2010 PhysOrg.com Explore further 2010 CES: Haier features the “completely wireless HDTV” ABI Research (Technology Market Research Company) said last year it expected 1 million installations will be performed by 2012. Currently WHDI is supported by 40 vendors, including Broadcom, LG, Intel, NEC, Panasonic, Samsung, Sony, Philips and Toshiba. In 2010 and beyond we can expect to see manufactures experimenting with different wireless technology. Until consumers start seeing the sets in stores, it’s difficult to determine which manufactures will have the most innovative wire free HDTV’s on the market. Intel, Microsoft, Dell band together for WiGig By using a coil that is approximately 1 foot by 1 foot in size, at the back of the TV set, 100 watts of electricity can be supplied at a distance up to 1 meter (3.28 feet). TV images are displayed by using WHDI (Wireless Home Digital Interface), a high-speed communication standard for wirelessly transmitting high-definition images. This leaves the back of the TV completely wire free. The WHDI uses a frequency band of 5 GHz which is the industry standard for WHDI technology developed by Amimon Ltd. By utilizing a bandwidth of 40 MHz, data rates up to 3 Gbps can be transmitted to transfer uncompressed 1080p 60Hz video to the TV; the maximum transmission range is one hundred feet.The wireless power transfer technology, utilizing magnetic coupling, was developed by WiTricity Corp, a US base venture firm that was founded by an MIT professor in April 2007. Electricity is transferred through the use of two resonant devices of the same frequency. This enables the maximum power to be transferred. center_img Citation: Haier Exhibits A Wireless HDTV Video System at the 2010 CES (w/ Video) (2010, January 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-01-haier-wireless-hdtv-video-ces.html (PhysOrg.com) — Haier America Digital Products Group (Chinese company) demonstrated the first completely wireless 32 inch LCD TV that is powered wirelessly up to a distance of 1 meter (3.28 feet). Wireless content is transferred by a system called Wireless Home Digital Interface (WHDI). Using a 5GHz frequency band it can transfer uncompressed 1080p 60Hz video to the TV. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

HP launches webOS 20 for the Palm and new Pre2 smartphone w

first_img More information: Full press release, Features of webOS 2.0, Palm Pre 2 features With webOS 2.0 release true multi-tasking makes it possible to manage multiple open applications and notifications using natural touch gestures. New with this release, ‘Stacks’ logically groups together your open apps so they work the way you do. Whether you’re sending a text message or playing a game, ‘Stacks’ keeps related items together so managing multiple tasks is made easier.Jon Rubinstein, senior vice president and general manager, Palm Global Business Unit, HP stated in an HP press release: “With webOS 2.0, we’re advancing the innovations we introduced 16 months ago, expanding the features that make webOS great for consumers, enterprises and developers. We’ve made tremendous strides since the platform launched, and now we’re taking our biggest leap forward with powerful new features that make it easier to get more things done with your webOS device.”This next generation of webOS makes it easier to get more done. Some of new the features in this release include:True Multitasking – webOS lets you easily manage multiple open applications and notifications using natural touch gestures. Also ‘Stacks’ logically groups together your open apps so they work the way you do.Just Type – Lets you start an email, create a message, update your status, or search the web all without opening an application. Just Type is open to developers, so they can integrate with the search function and add their own user-customizable shortcuts, called Quick Actions.Adobe Flash Player 10.1 Beta – webOS 2.0 now supports Adobe Flash Player 10.1 beta in the browser, which provides access to rich, Flash-based web content.HP Synergy – connects you seamlessly to multiple web services. With the Synergy feature, you just log into your accounts like Facebook, Google, hotmail, Yahoo, etc. and all your information automatically populates your phone. webOS 2.0 will extend the support for Synergy to developers so that they can create feature rich applications directly into the core of the webOS experience. HP’s new Palm Pre 2 smartphone will be the first device to run webOS 2.0 and will be available on Friday in France from SFR and is scheduled to be available in the United States from Verizon Wireless and in Canada later this year.The webOS 2.0 update will be delivered to existing customers in the coming months, with exact timing to be announced at a later date. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Citation: HP launches webOS 2.0 for the Palm and new Pre2 smartphone (w/ Video) (2010, October 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-10-hp-webos-palm-pre2-smartphone.htmlcenter_img © 2010 PhysOrg.com (PhysOrg.com) — HP has just released their webOS 2.0 for the Palm Pre and Pre2. This release should give HP a more completive edge in the smarphone arena. WebOS 2.0 offers consumers a new application experience not found on any other smarphone platform. Palm losing pace with Pre Pluslast_img read more

New mass spectrometry technique clouds early European inflation theories

first_img © 2010 PhysOrg.com The research, led by Anne-Marie Desaulty, sought to answer once and for all the question of why the whole of Europe experienced a dramatic, inexplicable rise in overall prices, shortly after the discovery of the new world.Until now, researchers have had to rely on the results of mass spectrometry analysis of lead and copper found in coins to trace its origins, because the results obtained from doing so on silver couldn’t be trusted. Unfortunately, due to the difficulty of reading isotope results for lead, and the fact that copper was used at later dates to re-mint coins, no real conclusions could be drawn from the results of such tests. Now however, using the new technique, the team was able to discern that silver from Mexico didn’t begin appearing in Spanish coins until the inflationary period was over; though it did become the principal source of silver in such coins thereafter.In the past, mass spectrometry tests on silver were fraught with difficulty due to the ratio of its two stable isotopes, silver-107 and 109; making them extremely difficult to measure. New advances in mass spectrometry devices however, coupled with multiple collectors, has made the process more sensitive; sensitive enough so that the results of such tests can now be trusted; and those findings suggest that it was not the sudden importation of Mexican silver as a means of minting Spanish coins that led to the inflation, because there simply wasn’t enough of it present in coins during the period in question.Unfortunately though, because the study was able to rule out the influx of Mexican silver as a cause for the inflation, a new gap in knowledge has been left behind, which will send scholars and researchers back to the drawing boards to explain why in fact, prices in Europe rose as they did, and why it happened for so long. Major silver mining centers and mints in the Viceroyalty of Peru. Also shown are the Pb geological model ages T in millions of years of various metal ores. Image (c) PNAS, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1018210108 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Ancient coins teach researchers about modern society More information: Isotopic Ag–Cu–Pb record of silver circulation through 16th–18th century Spain, PNAS, Published online before print May 23, 2011, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1018210108AbstractEstimating global fluxes of precious metals is key to understanding early monetary systems. This work adds silver (Ag) to the metals (Pb and Cu) used so far to trace the provenance of coinage through variations in isotopic abundances. Silver, copper, and lead isotopes were measured in 91 coins from the East Mediterranean Antiquity and Roman world, medieval western Europe, 16th–18th century Spain, Mexico, and the Andes and show a great potential for provenance studies. Pre-1492 European silver can be distinguished from Mexican and Andean metal. European silver dominated Spanish coinage until Philip III, but had, 80 y later after the reign of Philip V, been flushed from the monetary mass and replaced by Mexican silver. Citation: New mass spectrometry technique clouds early European inflation theories (2011, May 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-05-mass-spectrometry-technique-clouds-early.html (PhysOrg.com) — Using a new coupled mass spectrometry technique that employs multiple collectors, researchers in France have shown that it was not an influx of silver from the America’s that caused high inflation in Europe from the early 1500’s to mid 1600, as some historians have long believed. Their results, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) show that the gradual replacement of coins made from Spanish silver to imported Mexican silver, did not occur until nearly fifty years later. Explore furtherlast_img read more

HPs webOS moves out of tablet foxhole into appliance mode

first_img HP looks to the ‘cloud’ (PhysOrg.com) — HP is set to spread the wings of its operating system for its smartphones and TouchPad tablet, webOS, and plant it into a wider technology space of an OS for cars and household appliances. HP’s webOS chief, Stephen DeWitt, who leads the webOS global business unit, is on an HP mission to build up an ecosystem of developers and manufacturers, according to a report in The Wall Street Journal. DeWitt said HP is looking into webOS embedded into cars and appliances. He said HP was into talks with auto and appliance makers but he did not specify any company names. HP’s webOS has a touchscreen interface and Internet connectivity. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. In late June, there was talk about HP courting Samsung. The potential win for HP would be in the fact that HP could license the software to Samsung, as a key hardware maker. Leo Apotheker, HP CEO, said HP was similarly talking to other companies about the webOS too.An operating system, on commercial terms, is only as viable as is the number of manufacturers and developers willing to climb on board. HP has good reason to be aggressive in growing a WebOS ecosystem, considering its investment in the webOS with its purchase of Palm at $1.2 billion last year. Sales of the HP tablet TouchPad which features webOS, have been less than startling.Beyond use in smartphones and tablets, Apotheker has championed the webOS as a superior operating system. “It’s not correct to believe that it should only be on HP devices. There are all kinds of other people who want to make whatever kind of hardware they make and would like to connect them to the Internet,” he has said. Making the webOS a device-compatible platform of choice for the future has been pushed to the top as an HP agenda item. Besides wanting to rev up a mission for cars and appliances, HP has sought to make a business-adoption case for webOS as enterprise-ready.“It’s not just about the tablet, Richard Kerris, an HP vice president, has said. “It’s about the OS, the ecosystem and connecting devices like phones, printers, tablets and computers together.”As for the OS chance of hitting a home run in the car and home-appliance industry, it is recognized that the competitive edge for appliance makers in the future will involve how smart their appliances can be. Users will grow accustomed to embedded systems in their kitchens that can tell them when the milk is running low or how to make an omelet.Likewise, the auto industry is using smart systems in numerous ways. Is the webOs, though, offering compelling enough reasons for manufacturers to scurry on board? That’s the question being asked by HP-watchers. They see a tough road ahead. Thilo Koslowski, analyst, notes that auto makers don’t take lightly the idea of switching technology partners in whom they have already invested. Microsoft’s embedded Windows OS is in use in appliances and vehicles; Google’s Android is reported to be gaining momentum as well. Last year, Panasonic Avionics, developers of entertainment systems for airplanes, said that it will use Android in products. Whirlpool told the WSJ it would not be adding the HP webOS to its appliances. Explore further © 2011 PhysOrg.com Citation: HP’s webOS moves out of tablet foxhole into appliance mode (2011, August 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-08-hps-webos-tablet-foxhole-appliance.htmllast_img read more

Scotland to deploy largest hydroelectric wave energy farm to date w video

first_img Explore further Citation: Scotland to deploy largest hydro-electric wave energy farm to date (w/ video) (2013, May 23) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-05-scotland-deploy-largest-hydro-electric-energy.html To generate electricity from ocean waves the project will utilize two separate mechanisms. The first is the Oyster—a device that uses wave motion to pump water to the second part of the system, a hydro-electric station—it converts the water pumped to it to electricity. The Oyster device sits just offshore (it’s bolted to the ocean floor) in water 10 to 12 meters deep. In essence it’s a large buoyant flap that is pushed back and forth by wave action—that motion is used to drive hydraulic pistons that push the water ashore. The Oyster is big, weighing in at roughly 200 tons—the flap alone is roughly 18 by 12 by 4 meters in size. Each Oyster device is capable of pushing enough water to the onshore station to produce 315kW of electricity. During good weather, just 2 meters of the top of the flap can be seen. To produce large amounts of electricity, multiple Oyster devices will be deployed, all connected to the same hydro-electric station.A company called Aquamarine Power will build the Oyster devices, some of which have already been successfully tested at another location in Scotland. The only hold up, a company rep told the press, was the timetable for installation of the undersea cable which is to distribute the electricity from the hydro-electric station to the grid. It will be put in place by European energy giant SSE which announced separately that they wouldn’t be able to finish laying the cable for the system until 2017. For that reason, the project overall isn’t expected to go online until sometime 2018. Ocean mavericks in Maine turn tide for electrical grid This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org) —Fergus Ewing, Scotland’s energy minister, has announced plans for the deployment of 40 to 50 Oyster hydro-electric wave devices off the country’s northwestern shore. The new facility will be capable of producing 40MW of electricity, which should be enough to power approximately 30,000 homes—making it the largest such facility in the world.center_img More information: www.aquamarinepower.com/projec … -800-project-orkney/ During the announcement, Ewing noted that Scotland is uniquely situated to take advantage of wave energy, noting the country offers 10 percent of Europe’s total wave power potential. The total expected cost of the project has not been announced, but money to pay for the new system will come from the government’s £18 million Marine Renewables Commercialization Fund. © 2013 Phys.org Aquamarine Power – Oyster 800 wave energy converter in action last_img read more

New study refutes claims of early humans in India prior to Mount

first_img More information: Genetic and archaeological perspectives on the initial modern human colonization of southern Asia, PNAS, Published online before print June 10, 2013, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1306043110 AbstractIt has been argued recently that the initial dispersal of anatomically modern humans from Africa to southern Asia occurred before the volcanic “supereruption” of the Mount Toba volcano (Sumatra) at ∼74,000 y before present (B.P.)—possibly as early as 120,000 y B.P. We show here that this “pre-Toba” dispersal model is in serious conflict with both the most recent genetic evidence from both Africa and Asia and the archaeological evidence from South Asian sites. We present an alternative model based on a combination of genetic analyses and recent archaeological evidence from South Asia and Africa. These data support a coastally oriented dispersal of modern humans from eastern Africa to southern Asia ∼60–50 thousand years ago (ka). This was associated with distinctively African microlithic and “backed-segment” technologies analogous to the African “Howiesons Poort” and related technologies, together with a range of distinctively “modern” cultural and symbolic features (highly shaped bone tools, personal ornaments, abstract artistic motifs, microblade technology, etc.), similar to those that accompanied the replacement of “archaic” Neanderthal by anatomically modern human populations in other regions of western Eurasia at a broadly similar date.Press release (Phys.org) —A team of British researchers has published a paper in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences refuting claims made by a research team in 2007 suggesting that humans migrated to India as early as 75,000 years ago. In their paper, they say mtDNA and new archeological evidence indicates that modern humans arrived in India approximately 50 to 55 thousand years ago. © 2013 Phys.org Invisible volcanic ash gives clues to Neanderthal demise For many years scientists believed modern humans had migrated from Africa to India approximately 50,000 to 60,000 years ago. Then in 2007, a team of archeologists discovered some stone tools that had apparently been made by modern human ancestors in a site in southeastern India, which appeared to have been from a much earlier time. The team reported finding such tools both above and below the ash line caused by the massive eruption of Mount Toba approximately 74,000 years ago. The explosion from the volcano is believed to have sent so much ash into the air that the planet was cooled for several years thereafter.In this new effort, the researchers sought to settle the arguments about the Indian migration timeline once and for all. To do so, they collected mitochondrial DNA samples from 817 volunteers all across the Eurasian subcontinent, while also reexamining the stone tools that had originally set off the debate. In studying the mtDNA, the researchers concluded that modern humans had settled in the area no earlier than 55,000 to 60,000 years ago. The evidence indicated that early humans had settled along the coast first, then traveled inland following rivers. Such a timeline indicates that modern humans didn’t migrate to India till well after the eruption of Mount Toba.Meanwhile, others on the team investigating the stone tools discovered by the earlier team found that they were very likely the work of Neanderthals, not early modern humans. They note that the author of the original study claiming the stones had been made by early humans had withdrawn the paper with the suggestion that the tools were likely made by an unidentified group of archaic people living in the area at the time.Taken together, the team says their findings should once and for all end the debate regarding the migration timeline for modern humans moving into India. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciencescenter_img Citation: New study refutes claims of early humans in India prior to Mount Toba eruption (2013, June 11) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-06-refutes-early-humans-india-prior.html Explore further Graphic by Dora Kemp. (c)2013 PNAS, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1306043110 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Best of Last Week – Dark matter acting like pions changes to

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org)—It was an interesting week for physics as a team made up of international researchers came up with a new theory that says dark matter acts like a well-known particle—they suggest it has similarities to pions, which bind atomic nuclei together. Also, a macroscopic quantum phenomena was discovered in ice by a team of researchers in China—at very cold temperatures the ice behaved in a way that could only be explained by quantum tunneling, a rare example of quantum phenomena emerging on a macroscopic scale. In other technology news, a team with Escape Dynamics conducted tests with a thruster that showed that using microwaves to propel a craft into space might work, which could mean the end of multi-stage rockets that use propellants. Also a young scientist discovered that magnetic material is unnecessary to create spin current—postdoce researcher Stephen Wu made the discovery while working at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory. Also, interestingly, a team of researches looking into reports of astronauts’ skin changing before and after missions, discovered that for at least two men, their epidermis grew thinner during their mission by 20 percent—though it is still unclear why that happens.In other news, a team of scientists proposed 3D graphene-like ‘hyper-honeycomb’ structures—the group with the University of Oklahoma believes they could make up a new family of 3D based graphene materials. Also, another team at the University of St Andrews in Scotland fed white blood cells micro-lasers causing them to produce light—the hope is that it will allow for tracking cells as they move through living organisms. Another team looked into how music alters the teenage brain and found that training, even as late as high school, can improve teen response to sound and improved hearing and language skills. And another international team of researchers asked, why do mitochondria retain their own genome? They still cannot say for sure, but they conducted tests looking to see if the mitochondrial genome encodes membrane proteins that are hydrophobic—if encoded in the nucleus, they would be filtered by a signal recognition particle and misdirected into the endoplasmic reticulum. And finally, if you are an expert in your field, you might be more susceptible to alleging knowledge of information that was completely made-up—a team with members from Cornell and Tulane Universities found that self-proclaimed experts are more vulnerable to the illusion of knowledge. Something to keep in mind, perhaps before offering opinions that could come back to haunt you. Explore further Typically when referring to electrical current, an image of electrons moving through a metallic wire is conjured. Using the spin Seebeck effect (SSE), it is possible to create a current of pure spin (a quantum property of electrons related to its magnetic moment) in magnetic insulators. However, this work demonstrates that the SSE is not limited to magnetic insulators but also occurs in a class of materials known as paramagnets. Since magnetic moments within paramagnets do not interact with each other like in conventional ferromagnets, and thus do not hold their magnetization when an external magnetic field is removed, this discovery is unexpected and challenges current theories for the SSE. New ways of generating spin currents may be important for low-power high-speed spin based computing (spintronics), and is also an area of great fundamental interest. The paramagnetic SSE changes the way we think about thermally driven spintronics, allowing for the creation of new devices and architectures where spin currents are generated without ferromagnetic materials, which have been the centerpiece of all spin-based electronic devices up until this point.center_img Why do mitochondria retain their own genome? © 2015 Phys.org Citation: Best of Last Week – Dark matter acting like pions, changes to astronaut skin and illusion of knowledge by experts (2015, July 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-07-week-dark-pions-astronaut-skin.htmllast_img read more

Investigating the motility of swimming Euglena

first_img Researchers at SISSA, the National Institute of of Oceanography and Applied Geophysics (OGS), Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna and Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya have recently carried out a study investigating the motility of Euglena Gracilis, a Euglenid, particularly in its response to confinement. In their study, published in Nature Physics, they examined the responses of swimming Euglena gracilis in environments of controlled crowding and geometry. “The large-amplitude coordinated movements of Euglena cells, called metaboly, have been described for centuries, and still today fascinate microbiologists, biophysicists and amateur microscopists,” Marino Arroyo, one of the researchers who carried out the study, told Phys.org. “To our knowledge, no other unicellular organisms can move with such elegance and coordination. Yet, how and why they do it is a mystery. Curiosity was what drove us to study the motility of Euglena.”The large-amplitude and coordinated body deformations observed in Euglena are typically referred to as ‘euglenoid movement,’ or ‘metaboly.’ Metaboly varies greatly between species and sometimes even within a species, ranging from a rounding and gentle bend or twist to periodic and highly concerted peristaltic waves that travel along the cell body. “Amongst biophysicists, metaboly was thought to be a way to swim in a fluid, where these cells live,” Arroyo said. “However, protistologists are not convinced by this function for metaboly, since Euglena can swim very fast beating their flagellum, as do many other cell types. Instead, the predominant view is that metaboly is a functionless vestige ‘inherited’ from ancestors that used cell body deformations to engulf large prey. Watching cells executing such a beautiful and coordinated dance, we did not believe that it served no purpose. Our study started as an effort to substantiate such a non-scientific gut feeling.” Dilute cultures of Euglena cells generally swim using their flagellum and without changing their body shape. Arroyo and his colleagues, however, observed that as time passed and the fluid under the microscope evaporated, their culture became more crowded and cells started to develop metaboly. © 2019 Science X Network Explore further More information: Giovanni Noselli et al. Swimming Euglena respond to confinement with a behavioural change enabling effective crawling, Nature Physics (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41567-019-0425-8 https://www.nature.com/articles/s41567-019-0425-8 “Inspired by these observations and amateur YouTube videos, we hypothesized that the cell deformations could be triggered by contact with other cells or boundaries in a crowded environment, and that under these conditions, metaboly could be useful to crawl, rather than swim,” Antonio De Simone, another researchers involved in the study, told Phys.org. “Confirming this hypothesis was remarkably easy. As soon as we slightly pressed cells between two glass surfaces, or drove them into thin capillaries, they started to systematically perform metaboly, which resulted in the fastest crawling by any cell type, as far as we know,” added Giovanni Noselli, the first author of the study. Once they finished testing this hypothesis, the researchers started comparing the crawling behaviour they observed in Euglena with that of animal cells, for which a greater number of studies are currently available. Past studies observed that animal cells crawling in a thin tube tend to push against its walls in order to move forward and overcome the resistance of the fluid in the tube.”We found that, thanks to their peristaltic deformations, Euglena can push either on the walls or on the fluid to move forward, making of metaboly a remarkably robust mode of confined locomotion,” De Simone said. “They can actually move displacing very little fluid in a ‘stealthy’ propulsion mode, and they cannot be stopped even if the hydraulic resistance in the capillary is increased substantially.”In their experiments, Arroyo, De Simone, Noselli and their colleague Alfred Beran noticed that Euglena cells were able to adapt their gait to varying degrees of confinement. To perform this behavior, the cells could be using a sensory system to detect their surrounding environment and some form of internal information processing to adapt their activity according to the degree of confinement. The researchers found this explanation perplexing, however, particularly seeing as Euglena are single cells with no nervous system. To better understand how a single Euglena cell can control such an adaptable and robust mode of locomotion, Arroyo and his colleagues computationally modeled the motile apparatus of Euglena cells, which is essentially a striated cell envelope.”We wondered if their active envelope, called a pellicle, responsible for the cell deformations, would mechanically self-adapt to varying mechanical conditions,” Arroyo said. “To examine this, we developed a computational model showing that the compliance of the materials and molecular motors that make up the active envelope of Euglena could explain this adaptability, which in robotics is called mechanical or embodied intelligence.” Arroyo and his colleagues gathered fascinating observations about the body deformations of some Euglenids, suggesting that this behavior could, in some cases, be triggered by confinement. In addition to demonstrating one function of metaboly, their study established a new category of cellular crawlers, which are particularly fast, robust and adaptable. “If crawling by metaboly is so advantageous, one may wonder why it is not conserved amongst other species,” Arroyo said. “The answer is that it requires an intricate machinery, the pellicle, which is a striated envelope made out of elastic strips connected by molecular motors. This selectively deformable surface lies somewhere between the rigid wall of plant cells and the fluid envelope of animal cells. Beyond biology, we think that the underlying physical/geometric principles that enable shape changes of this envelope can be applied to artificial engineered systems, e.g. in soft robotics.”The computational model developed by Arroyo and his colleagues could finally shed light on the function of widely documented euglenoid movements. Their findings suggest that the gait adaptability of these organisms does not require specific mechanosensitive feedback, but rather could be explained by the mechanical self-regulation of an elastic and extended motor system.In their recent study, the researchers successfully identified one function of and the operating principles behind the adaptable body deformation of Euglena cells. They are now planning to further investigate the cellular mechanisms by which metaboly is triggered and by which cellular deformations propagate. “We plan to examine metaboly across different species of Euglena,” DeSimone said. “Preliminary observations reveal various flavors of metaboly. We are also working on building artificial materials and devices inspired in the active and deformable envelope of Euglena cells”. Journal information: Nature Physicscenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Some species of Euglenids, a diversified family of aquatic unicellular organisms, can perform large-amplitude, elegantly coordinated body deformations. Although this behavior has been known for centuries, its function is still highly debated. Pond dwellers called Euglena swim in polygons to avoid light Citation: Investigating the motility of swimming Euglena (2019, March 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-motility-euglena.html Credit: Noselli et al.last_img read more

Frans de Waal Embraces Animal Emotions in Mamas Last Hug

first_imgThe two old friends hadn’t seen each other lately. Now one of them was on her deathbed, crippled with arthritis, refusing food and drink, dying of old age. Her friend had come to say goodbye. At first she didn’t seem to notice him. But when she realized he was there, her reaction was unmistakable: Her face broke into an ecstatic grin. She cried out in delight. She reached for her visitor’s head and stroked his hair. As he caressed her face, she draped her arm around his neck and pulled him closer. The mutual emotion so evident in this deathbed reunion was especially moving and remarkable because the visitor, Dr. Jan Van Hooff, was a Dutch biologist, and his friend, Mama, was a chimpanzee. The event — recorded on a cellphone, shown on TV and widely shared on the internet — provides the opening story and title for the ethologist Frans de Waal’s game-changing new book, “Mama’s Last Hug: Animal Emotions and What They Tell Us About Ourselves.” Read the whole story: The New York Timeslast_img read more

Emotional blackmail works with parents

first_imgMy father has been having an affair with a lady for several years. My mother is a homemaker and she has tolerated this for years. I have got a job now and will soon move to another city. She refuses to move with me. What should I do?Om Prakash, Uttar PradeshWomen are miracles. We tend to tolerate beyond our means sometimes. You surely should try and convince her. If she still doesn’t agree you can try an emotional trick after you’ve settled in your new place. Just call and pretend to have a health issue. Mothers are bound to leave the world behind to take care of their children.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Once she’s with you, blackmail her emotionally by highlighting how much you need her. This might work!I have two daughters. My elder one is fair and pretty and the younger one is dark. Our relatives pass comments on this and this affects my younger one badly. How do I handle this?Divya Mathur, New DelhiStop meeting such relatives! In today’s day and age it is just pathetic that someone’s complexion is still a discriminating factor! This is really sad and unwanted. You should ensure that you drill this well into the heads of both your children that colour and looks don’t compose a person’s life. Always highlight small, good things to your daughters and appreciate their talents. If the younger one is ever upset about this, tell her that she is the most beautiful thing that happened to you. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixOur only son has developed a major drinking issue. He has his own business but he regularly comes home in an unstable condition. What should we do? Mrs and Mr. Sinha, HaryanaYou should have a chat with him at the breakfast table. As parents, express your concern in a friendly manner. Try to understand his reasons for drinking so much. Don’t get into an argument, avoid confrontations if you can. Look and sound hurt but don’t nag. Parents’ tears and sincere requests sometimes have huge healing effects on kids. You can also take some inputs from doctors who can advise you on ways to treat alchoholism. Seek professional help from rehabilitation centres, if needed. Good luck! My best friend and I have fallen for the same girl. We all go to the same college. I don’t know whats going to happen in future! Please help!Name unknownWell, either you both will fall out of this ‘crush’ or either one has to let go in the near future. Another thing that has to be considered – what does the girl feel? This triangular love story sounds interesting but in reality, only those ‘two’ will be together who have similar frequency and wavelength. Love will happen only when the two ‘click’. So, your friend and you have to wait for the right time to understand what’s best for all. Don’t lose your friendship for anything else!Have a love or life query you cannot find an answer to? Send your questions to – roopshashotm@gmail.comlast_img read more