Pastors pile pressure on MP over gay marriage bill

first_imgNZ Herald 28 Aug 2012Labour MP Louisa Wall has come under intense pressure in her own electorate, with a large group of churches issuing a strongly worded warning to drop her bill to legalise same-sex marriage.Twenty-five pastors from South Auckland churches signed a letter to the MP for Manurewa saying they oppose her proposed change to the Marriage Act and want it withdrawn.“Over the last decade the Labour Party has passed laws that have weakened the family unit and angered their traditional supporters. This proposed bill would be another blow,” the letter said.The South Auckland electorates of Manurewa, Mangere and Manukau East are heartland Labour territory, and the party’s MP for Mangere, Su’a William Sio, has already said he will vote against the bill.http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10829924READ the full letterlast_img read more

St. Louis Cardinal Volleyball Classic-8th Grade

first_imgThe St. Nicholas 8th Grade volleyball team was runner-up in the St. Louis Volleyball Tourney on Saturday, Sepember 13.St. Nicholas played in the championship match against St. Louis. St. Nicholas was defeated in 2 sets with scores of 25-19 and 25-14.The 8th grade team is now 10-2 overall, and 8-0 in regular season (without tourneys).Courtesy of STN Coach Debbie Gregg.last_img

Moyes braced for hostile reception

first_img Press Association Tears filled Moyes’ eyes at Goodison Park when he waved goodbye to Everton fans last May following the final game of his 11-year spell at the club. The Scot was given a guard of honour, and he struggled to contain his emotions as he walked around the pitch at the end of the 2-0 win over West Ham. Everton qualified for the Champions League in 2005 – although they were defeated by Villarreal in qualifying – and Moyes also led the Merseyside club to the FA Cup final in 2009. The likes of Rooney, Phil Jagielka and Mikel Arteta all flourished under Moyes’ tutelage, but it was United’s £28million bid for Leighton Baines and Marouane Fellaini that turned Everton supporters against their former manager. Just after Everton’s win at Old Trafford, Moyes was forced to deny claims he branded Toffees supporters a “disgrace” for the barracking they gave him. “You get on with your job,” said Moyes when asked how he felt after being verbally abused by Everton fans. “I am Manchester United manager now and that is what I concentrate on. “(Sunday’s) game is not about me, it’s about Everton and Manchester United. “This was the first game I looked for when the fixture list came out. “I was always thinking when would I first be going back to Goodison. “I will go back with great memories. I had great times there. “It will be a strange day, but I’m looking forward to it.” Moyes further angered Everton fans by claiming he was trying to do “the right thing” for Baines and Fellaini by offering them a route out of Goodison. The fact that seventh-placed United are nine points behind Everton suggests Baines was right to stay and commit while Fellaini may have been better off doing so too. The contrast between United’s woeful season under Moyes and Everton’s success with Martinez at the helm could hardly be greater. The failed double-bid does not seem to have damaged Moyes’ relationship with Everton, who branded the offer “derisory” and “insulting” at the time. “I have always had a great relationship with the players, the board and with the chairman,” Moyes said. “I regularly get messages from the players wishing me good luck and I saw the chairman last week at Sunderland, but I go back as Manchester United manager and I am going back there to win.” David Moyes expects an “intimidating” atmosphere when he takes his Manchester United team to Everton for the first time since he left for Old Trafford. But there was little sign of that love last December when Everton visited Old Trafford. Everton, rising up the table, beat United 1-0 and Moyes’ afternoon was soured by a large section of Toffees fans who barracked the Scot and declared their former manager would be sacked in the morning. There is a growing feeling that, despite the pleas of his successor Roberto Martinez, Moyes will be subjected to the same sort of treatment from the terraces on Sunday when he returns. The United manager, who has Wayne Rooney available following his recovery from a toe injury, wants the focus to be on the teams on the pitch, rather than himself, but he could not escape being questioned about the matter at his pre-match press conference on Friday. “It’s always been an intimidating atmosphere at Goodison,” said Moyes when asked about the potential reception he might get. “I was a manager there and I know exactly what it can be like. “Football will be football. I am a football supporter and that is how it works sometimes.” Moyes saved Everton from relegation when he replaced Walter Smith in March 2002 and from then on it was a tale of constant success for the former Preston boss despite budget constraints. last_img read more

Big stories at Augusta

first_imgFormer champion Adam Scott summed it up perfectly when he said there were big stories in golf this week ahead of the 79th Masters, which gets under way on Thursday. Press Association First and foremost is the question of whether Rory McIlroy can become only the sixth player in history to complete the career grand slam by winning his first green jacket and third major in a row. Then there is the uncertainty about which Tiger Woods has arrived at Augusta National, the 14-time major winner or the injury-plagued 39-year-old whose last completed round was an 82, the worst of his professional career. “It hasn’t even been that it’s been a bad 18 holes, it’s just been a bad nine holes where it sort of got away from me,” McIlroy said. “I think I’m more experienced now. I had a run last year where I would throw in a bad nine holes, usually on a Friday, which happened here. I think I’m better equipped now to handle it if things don’t go the right way. “Mentally I feel like I’m in a far better place on the golf course and being able to handle adversity whenever it may come my way out there. You’ve just got to realise that there are holes out here that par is a good score and you move on. “You’ve got the obvious opportunities out here to make birdies and the obvious hole where you try to take your par and avoid the big number. That’s what I’ll be trying to do this week.” Whether McIlroy wins or not, statistics suggest the cream will again rise to the top on Sunday evening. Since Clarke and Keegan Bradley won the last two majors of 2011 when ranked 111th and 108th in the world respectively, the lowest ranked winner of a major has been Ernie Els, who was 40th when he won the 2012 Open at Lytham. In 2013, Scott was ranked seventh when he won the Masters, Justin Rose fifth before his US Open triumph at Merion and Phil Mickelson also fifth before his Open victory at Muirfield. Jason Dufner was 21st when he won the US PGA at Oak Hill. Last year Watson was 12th before his Masters triumph, Martin Kaymer 28th ahead of his runaway US Open victory and McIlroy eighth and first before winning the Open and US PGA respectively. The statistics do not favour a European winner however, with Jose Maria Olazabal the last to don the famous green jacket in 1999 after a period of dominance which saw e ight wins between 1988 and 1999 and seven out of nine from Sandy Lyle’s triumph in 1988 to Faldo’s third title in 1996. Scott himself is looking to claim a second Masters title in three years after reverting back to the long putter he used so successfully in 2013, even though the ban on anchored strokes comes into force in eight months’ time. And Bubba Watson can become only the fourth player after Jack Nicklaus, Nick Faldo and Woods to successfully defend the title if he can claim a third win in just four years. McIlroy is the favourite despite recording just one top 10 in six previous appearances, his tie for eighth last year coming after the embarrassment of being outscored by his marker, Augusta member Jeff Knox, in the third round. The world number one could have made the Masters his first major title after taking a four-shot lead into the final round in 2011, only to collapse to a closing 80 that featured a triple-bogey seven on the 10th – where his hooked drive found a part of the course never seen before – and a four-putt on the famous par-three 12th. Remarkably he bounced back two months later to win the US Open by eight shots and believes his “unravelling” at Augusta was the most important day of his career. By winning the 2012 US PGA and the Open at Hoylake last year the 25-year-old completed three legs of the career grand slam, with a second PGA title at Valhalla the icing on the cake as it proved he could win after a back-nine battle in the final round. Past and present Ryder Cup captains Paul McGinley and Darren Clarke, Phil Mickelson and Woods all believe it is inevitable that McIlroy will win the Masters at some point in his career, but whether it happens this year will depend on his ability to avoid damaging high scores. In his last five appearances McIlroy has had one round of 77 or higher, while he surprisingly played the par fives in level par last year and finished eight shots behind Watson, who played them in eight under. last_img read more

23-6 win over Mattanawcook gives Golden Bucks 8-0 season

first_img Like he did in the ’60s, Noel Paul Stookey sings out in troubling times – December 27, 2017 Latest posts by Hugh Bowden (see all) Hugh BowdenExecutive EditorHugh writes editorials, covers Hancock County sports and helps out where needed in The American’s editorial department. When he’s not on the sidelines, he enjoys playing jazz and tennis. hbowden@ellsworthamerican.com Latest Posts Biocenter_img GSA surges in 4th to win Northern Maine title – February 26, 2017 Is this the kind of government we deserve? – July 10, 2017 BUCKSPORT — On Friday at Carmichael Field, the Bucksport Golden Bucks completed a perfect 8-0 regular season with their second consecutive win over a previously unbeaten team, downing the Mattanawcook Academy Lynx 23-6.A week earlier, Bucksport dealt the Maine Central Institute Huskies of Pittsfield their first loss, battling to a 42-35 win.With Friday’s win, the Bucks earned a first-round bye in the Little Ten Conference Class D playoffs, which will begin this coming weekend.Bucksport’s semifinal opponent on Friday, Nov. 8, will be the winner of the upcoming quarterfinal playoff between the fourth-ranked Orono Red Riots (5-3) and the fifth-ranked Dexter Tigers (3-5).Find in-depth coverage of local news in The Ellsworth American. Subscribe digitally or in print.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textlast_img read more

`Show me the evidence!’ Urling tells GFF president

first_imgFOLLOWING Guyana Football Federation’s (GFF) president Wayne Forde comments that several ‘red flags’ were raised from an investigation into the audits of the ‘books’ under the FIFA-installed Normalisation Committee, Clinton Urling, the former committee chairman, is challenging the Federation’s head to provide evidence to substantiate his statement.Forde, in a recent interview spoke of the GFF’s inability to receive their usual FIFA subvention due to recommendations that came out of an audit investigation conducted by Pricewaterhouse Coopers (PwC), specifically related to the 11-month period of Urling’s Normalisation Committee tenure.According to Forde, the audit identified a number of ‘red flags’ forcing FIFA to place Guyana under conditional funding, thereby creating limited access to developmental funding – a situation that did not totally stymie the development of the sport here, but severely affected the Federation’s ability to offer much-needed support to Member Associations (MAs) for them to execute their respective programmes.“Since it is alleged that many (red flags) occurred, it would be helpful to the public for the GFF to quote the many specific infractions as identified in the audit document and state specifically what the GFF is doing to ensure those anomalies identified do not occur in the future” Urling told Chronicle Sport yesterday.“This confounding revelation leaves more questions than answers. If the funding was in fact blocked, where did the GFF receive moneys from for the countless initiatives, as outlined in depth in the article, since assuming office almost two years ago, including paying staff and the upcoming international friendly against Grenada and the frequent international travel by the president and executives?” Urling stated.GFF president Wayne FordeUrling, said all the spending and moneys received by the Normalisation Committee “was chronicled and presented to the electoral Congress in November 2015 and that data was publicly posted on the GFF’s website and can easily be obtained by any person or journalist from the GFF’s office. Those available documents can substantiate the financial data of our tenure.”“At no point has FIFA, the authority which appointed the Normalisation Committee, contacted any member of the Committee for any verification or comment on any audit conducted. Also, how can Forde say on the one hand no funding was received but yet since the NC’s departure, and currently, the GFF has engaged in many activities, including several international friendlies for both male and female at youth and senior levels and concluded two seasons of the ‘elite league’. Something just doesn’t add up,” Urling declared.Urling reasoned that when the Normalisation Committee members were asked to volunteer by FIFA to rectify the many challenges facing the GFF, a robust financial system with reporting mechanisms was implemented.“We hired a finance director to work with the finance officer at the time Christine Jones and both individuals were responsible for preparing all vouchers that had to meet the scrutiny of then General Secretary Richard Groden before being presented to Dr Karen Pilgrim and I to sign as joint account officer of the GFF, in our capacities as Chair and Vice-Chair,” said Urling.He continued, “Shortly after we handed over the reins to the current GFF executives, we saw the resignations of several accounting department personnel, including those hired by the current executives.“Additionally we saw the GFF change two General Secretaries in a short time span. Much has to be asked about the current administrative turbulence, which one hopes does not slide the GFF back to a situation of needing another Normalisation Committee.”last_img read more

5 Keys 4 UW

first_imgBRYAN FAUST/Herald file photo1. Match their emotion -The Nittany Lions are reeling from a seven-game losing streak, and there would be no more emphatic way to right the ship than to knock off the No. 4 team in the nation. Penn State will undoubtedly come out with plenty of fire, and Wisconsin must match this intensity.2. Prevent penetration -Penn State’s two leading scorers, Geary Claxton and Jamelle Cornley, both score the majority of their points by getting to the rim. Badger defenders must do a particularly good job of keeping these two out of the lane and force them to take contested, outside shots.3. Involve Brian Butch in the offense -The Polar Bear, as Butch is affectionately referred to, was in hibernation last week during the loss to Indiana, tallying only three points on 1-3 shooting. When Butch emerges as an offensive threat to compliment Alando Tucker and Kammron Taylor, the Badgers are virtually unbeatable. Fortunately for Wisconsin, the forecast for University Park, Pa., at game time is 12 degrees with light snow — ideal conditions for a large arctic mammal.4. Beware of shooters -The Nittany Lions, while relying on drives to the basket, are an underrated three-point-shooting team. In particular, the Badgers must be aware of Mike Walker, who has drained three shots from downtown four times this season.5. Keep Geary off the glass -Claxton leads the conference in offensive rebounding (3.8 per game) and rebounding in general (8.1). Although listed at only 6-foot-5, Wisconsin will need to put a body on him any time a shot goes up.last_img read more

WBB : SU doomed by foul trouble, poor shooting in loss to West Virginia in Big East tournament

first_img Published on March 2, 2012 at 12:00 pm Contact Ryne: rjgery@syr.edu Facebook Twitter Google+ Commentscenter_img Iasia Hemingway sat with a towel around her neck and a blank stare on her face. As the final minute of the first half ticked away, the Syracuse forward, already saddled, could only watch from the bench.The Orange was plagued by foul trouble against West Virginia on Saturday and never found its offensive rhythm. In addition to Hemingway, centers Kayla Alexander and Shakeya Leary spent extended periods on the bench, derailing SU’s inside game.‘It’s tough when you don’t have either one of your post players in the game to score the basketball,’ SU head coach Quentin Hillsman said in a phone interview. ‘It’s tough to play that way. That’s not how we play.’With its offensive game plan taken away, Syracuse (18-14) struggled to adapt and fell 63-48 to West Virginia (22-8) in the second round of the Big East tournament on Saturday. The Orange shot just 30.2 percent from the field against the Mountaineers and never threatened the Mountaineers’ lead in the second half. And the foul trouble led to 33 free-throw attempts for WVU compared to just 10 for Syracuse.The Orange seem destined to play in the Women’s National Invitation Tournament for the fourth consecutive year with the loss.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe Mountaineers finished the day shooting 35.3 percent from the field, but they knocked down 24 of their free throws to keep a comfortable lead over SU. For Hillsman, the difference in production at the foul line was too much to overcome.‘We got more shots than West Virginia, we got more offensive rebounds than West Virginia. I thought we kept our turnovers down reasonable,’ Hillsman said. ‘We kept them to 30 percent shooting.‘We just didn’t get to the foul line. They made 17 more free throws than we made and it’s tough to win that way.’Hillsman said it was also tough to stick with WVU without its top scoring options on the floor.With Hemingway, Alexander and Leary stuck on the bench much of the game — playing 22, 21 and 10 minutes, respectively, the offense depended on its backcourt to make plays. Elashier Hall went 5-of-19 from the field for 11 points and Carmen Tyson-Thomas made just six of her 15 attempts for 15 points.Hemingway finished with nine points on 2-of-8 shooting and committed four fouls. Alexander had three fouls and scored just four points on four shot attempts. Finally, Leary was held scoreless and fouled out of the game. The struggles were a stark contrast to the team’s first-round victory over Providence on Friday when the trio combined for 42 of SU’s 57 points.‘We play through our post and throw the ball inside and it’s tough when you don’t have have a (center) inside to score the basketball,’ Hillsman said.Hillsman felt his players attacked the basket with the same aggression as West Virginia, but they didn’t get the calls.Still, the head coach knows the Orange needed to capitalize on its opportunities on offense if it wanted to pull the upset.‘It was one of those things where maybe they were just powering up to the basket and we were doing the same thing on our end and the whistle didn’t go our way,’ Hillsman said. ‘But I thought at the end of the day, it’s a situation where we got to make shots in the lane and we can’t afford to leave points on the board.’rjgery@syr.edulast_img read more

Men’s hockey ready to roll again against Bemidji St.

first_imgA battle for momentum will take center ice this weekend when the 19th-ranked Wisconsin men’s hockey team faces off against Western Collegiate Hockey Association foe Bemidji State.The Badgers (11-9-6, 8-6-6 WCHA) will be looking to regain confidence after their 11-game unbeaten streak in conference play that was snapped last Saturday in a bitter 4-1 loss to North Dakota.Opposing them will be a Bemidji State team desperate to find a spark amid a disappointing season. The Beavers (5-16-5, 4-12-4 WCHA) have been dealing with their own streak but one comprised of winless weekends dating back to Dec. 15.Wisconsin proved they were better than their 1-7-2 start to the season by turning their play around and stringing together an impressive 10 wins and three ties in the 14 games leading up to last weekend’s series against the Sioux. UW will storm the ice ready to show Saturday’s loss was nothing more than a bump in the road.“We are a little bit upset about losing to North Dakota this past weekend, but I think everyone is happy and still in good spirits right now,” freshman forward Nic Kerdiles said. “We are doing good right now, we have a great record and are excited to play Bemidji this weekend … it’s huge the points that are up for grabs so hopefully we can get all of them.”Heading into this weekend’s series, the Badgers – with 22 points – find themselves in sixth place in the WCHA and just two points back from a three-team tie for third place at 24 points.The conference remains extremely competitive with the top seven teams being separated by just eight points. So while the four points up for grabs this weekend may seem minimal, senior defenseman and captain John Ramage knows the importance of a single point for his team in the WCHA.“The WCHA is so close right now anything could happen,” Ramage said. “This is definitely a weekend for us to get some points, it’s going to be a tough weekend but we need these four points.”History fares well for Wisconsin. The two teams have faced off four times in the past two years, and UW has found its way to victory each time. Yet those wins have not come easy, as all four of those games were decided by two goals or less.This season, the Beavers have averaged an even two goals per game and find scoring dispersed across their offensive lines. Senior forward Aaron McLeod leads the team in goals, with 10 on the season.Conversely, Wisconsin has found scoring primarily from one star, junior forward Michael Mersch, who has netted 16 for UW, accounting for 27.5 percent of the team’s scores this season.The advantage Wisconsin has heading into the series will be a combination of strength and familiarity. And after being on the road for two consecutive weekends, the Badgers are eager to be back playing on their home ice.“We have a lot of speed on this team and we know this building pretty well, so using our speed and our strengths on this ice surface will be huge for this weekend,” Kerdiles said.However, injuries on both ends of the ice may pose a key challenge for Wisconsin.Sophomore defenseman Jake McCabe suffered a right ankle injury in the final period against North Dakota Saturday. At his Monday press conference, head coach Mike Eaves said it was questionable whether McCabe or senior forward Derek Lee would be seeing any ice time against Bemidji State.Lee has been sidelined due to a concussion suffered on Jan. 26 against Alaska-Anchorage. The center has been a critical playmaker for the Badgers’ offense this season, leading the team with 16 assists and posting the second highest point total behind Mersch with 19.With Lee’s presence on the ice unknown, Kerdiles and the rest of the Badgers are ready to take over that playmaking role against the Beavers.“Obviously Lee is a huge part of the team and has got a lot of points this year and comes hard to play every game,” Kerdiles said. “It’s going to be tough not having him if he’s not playing, and we have a lot of ground to make up point-wise. But everyone is excited to go out there and put up those points.”In celebrating the 50th year in the Modern Era of Wisconsin Hockey, members of the 1983 National Championship team will be honored during Friday’s matchup. Both Friday and Saturday’s games are set to begin at 7 p.m. at the Kohl Center.last_img read more

Tipperary’s senior hurling captain announced

first_imgThat game throws in at 7.30pm in Dr. Morris Park.The winners will play Clare. The Tipperary Senior Hurling management team have announced that Brendan Maher (Borris-Ileigh) will remain as Captain for the 2015 season.While Padraic Maher (Thurles Sarsfields) has been confirmed as the team vice-captain.The senior hurlers will begin their season tomorrow in their Waterford Crystal Cup Preliminary Round game against Mary I. last_img