TFA Director of Selectors Applications

first_imgRecently applications were opened for TFA Director Positions. Due to receipt of late expressions of interest, TFA is reopening the process and is seeking Expressions of Interest (EOI) from suitable individuals to fill the following national level volunteers: ·          Director of Selectors EOI is due by COB Wednesday 16th June 2010 and should be forwarded to Tara Steel at tara.steel@austouch.com.auRelated Filesdirector_of_selectors_may_2010-pdflast_img

a month agoAdvisers urge Foden to stick with Man City

first_imgAdvisers urge Foden to stick with Man Cityby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the lovePhil Foden is being urged to stick with Manchester City.Foden feels a loan move away from the reigning Premier League champions would hinder his progress, despite his limited playing time.The family and friends of the 19-year-old are reported to be keen for the England youngster to continue his role at the Etihad under Pep Guardiola, in which he receives game time primarily in cup competitions.The Times says there is a feeling within Foden’s close circle that leaving City on loan could actually prove damaging to the teenager’s progression.And City have no intention of sending Foden out to another Premier League club on loan. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Canadas provinces promote free trade in Washington Some conditions apply

first_imgWASHINGTON – The premiers of Canada’s two largest provinces came to Washington on Friday to sing the praises of free trade: lower prices, more jobs, better selection at the grocery store and supply chains that create geo-political bonds.But that trade-liberalizing passion comes with some caveats.The premiers of Quebec and Ontario acknowledged that their own trade practices are not perfectly open in every sector and will not suddenly become that way in a newly renegotiated North American Free Trade Agreement.In one exchange, the governor of Colorado voiced a desire for freer trade in dairy. He made the request on a panel while seated beside Kathleen Wynne and Philippe Couillard — premiers of the two main dairy-producing provinces in a country that limits dairy imports.“Colorado is a big cheese-manufacturing state. So I’d probably want to negotiate a little bit about the cheese,” said Gov. John Hickenlooper.“Because we all have our specific things that we think, maybe, aren’t quite as fair.”Dairy isn’t the only protected sector in Canada. So is poultry. In addition, sub-national jurisdictions protect certain types of government contracts. Also, Couillard said it’s important for Quebec to maintain protections on cultural products in order to preserve its francophone culture.Couillard said it’s normal to maintain some protections in a trade deal.“I would say, tongue in cheek, there’s no such thing as a free-trade agreement. There are trade agreements with exceptions and specificities — ones countries need to keep in order to keep their policies and priorities moving forward,” Couillard told a panel at the Washington International Trade Association.“So, (let’s proceed with) modernizing (NAFTA). Keeping each others’ interests in perspective. Being able to put yourself in the other person’s shoes — to understand why (certain sectors are) so important… But overall let’s keep markets open.”On government procurement, Couillard told reporters he’s considering whether to speed up planned renovations of Montreal metro cars in order to provide work for Bombardier, as layoffs are threatened there.States and provinces have the right to exempt certain public agencies from competitive bidding under WTO rules, although Canada entered these NAFTA negotiations hoping to expand free trade for public contracts with the giant U.S. market.The U.S. has taken the opposite approach — it’s looking to limit trade in public works. That’s one of several controversial proposals from the Americans, who have also proposed creating a so-called sunset clause that could end NAFTA every five years.Wynne said this negotiation has been unusual.“Do I think there needs to be some systematic approach to reviewing (NAFTA)? I think we can all agree,” she said.“(But) what has triggered this review is not a systematic or rational process. That was not a political comment. But if there were a way to have a more rational (five-year) trigger, I think that would make sense.”Events a few kilometres away underscored her point.As Wynne was speaking at that panel, U.S. President Donald Trump was just outside the city at a conservative political conference where, in his speech to partisans, he trashed NAFTA.“NAFTA is no good. It never was any good. But, for some reason, nobody ever changed it,” Trump said.“They emptied our factories. You’ve got to see the car plants and the auto plants in Mexico. Like, you’ve never seen anything like it before. I want those companies — and they’re starting — I want them back here.”Ironically, he was saying this at a conference made famous by Ronald Reagan — the conservative favourite who spearheaded North American free-trade talks. Meanwhile, in downtown Washington, D.C., the premiers were promoting NAFTA inside the Ronald Reagan Building.The premiers are in Washington for the annual winter conference of state governors. State leaders have proven to be influential allies to people trying save NAFTA — writing letters, lobbying U.S. President Donald Trump and sharing their concerns with Vice-President Mike Pence.Couillard said he and his Ontario counterpart have met dozens of U.S. governors since last year — and every one supports NAFTA. He said they understand the benefits of free trade — cheaper fruits and vegetables available throughout the year, minerals from Canada that supply manufacturing in the southern U.S., an integrated defence-industrial base and nine million jobs linked to trade in the U.S. alone.“Open markets create jobs,” Couillard said. “Closed markets kill jobs. … Closed markets increase prices, for people who have economic difficulties.”He urged the countries to reach a quick agreement. He said businesses hate uncertainty, and said the uncertainty at some point needs to end.Projections from Scotiabank and the Bank of Canada estimate that if ambiguity lingers over NAFTA into next year, the ensuing investment concerns would reduce Canada’s GDP by about one-fifth of one per cent through 2019.last_img read more

Back to zero Canadas premiers gather in Saskatoon but none are women

first_imgMoe and Kenney kicked off the week together at the Calgary Stampede, where they met with their conservative counterparts from Ontario and New Brunswick, along with the premier from the consensus-based government of the Northwest Territories.They discussed hurdles in getting Canadian resources to market, as well as their opposition to federal bills overhauling resource reviews and banning oil tankers from the northern B.C. coast, and their common causing in fighting against the federal carbon tax.Ontario, Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan are all challenging Ottawa’s carbon levy in court.Bashevkin said she doesn’t think an absence of women at the Saskatoon meeting will affect the content and tone of discussions.There are assumptions that women tend to be less confrontational and seek consensus more than men, she said, but it’s not necessarily true.“We could ask right now … are the relations between British Columbia and Alberta any better than they were when we had two women premiers?“The answer’s probably not,” she said, adding that pipelines were still front and centre under Notley and former B.C. premier Christy Clark.Stephanie Taylor and Bill Graveland, The Canadian Press SASKATOON — Canada’s 13 provincial and territorial leaders are in Saskatchewan this week, but for the first time in years, the annual gathering won’t have women at the table.“Symbolically, it’s very significant that there is no woman premier,” said Sylvia Bashevkin, a political science professor at the University of Toronto, who researches women in politics and recently edited a book on the effect of women in the premier’s office.She said the last time Canada was without any woman as premier was between November 2002, when Pat Duncan left her post in the Yukon, and in November 2008, when Eva Aariak was sworn in as premier of Nunavut. By early 2014, more than half of Canadians lived in a jurisdiction governed by a woman. Rachel Notley was the last one standing until her government was defeated in Alberta three months ago.Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick have never had a woman as premier.The Council of the Federation conference, running Tuesday through Thursday, should serve as a reminder of the under representation of women at the premier’s table, Bashevkin said.It may also cause people to question whether gender diversity in Canada was really improving, she added.“It’s not just that things have stalled, but they’ve measurably gone backwards,” Bashevkin said.“We have to come back to the picture that’s going to come out of this premiers’ meeting and ask ourselves … what does it mean when we felt we’ve made all these breakthroughs and then we can go back to zero?”center_img The Council of the Federation conference starts at Big River First Nation, where the premiers are to meet with leaders of national Indigenous organizations, including the Assembly of First Nations.The gathering then shifts to Saskatoon, where premiers will participate in two-days of closed-door meetings at a downtown hotel.Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe, who is hosting the event, said health care, reducing trade barriers and increasing economic competitiveness are all topics on his agenda.Alberta Premier Jason Kenney has said that in addition to trade and the need to further develop the energy sector, he’ll be pushing for jurisdictions to mutually recognize professional credentials so workers can more easily move between provinces for work.last_img read more

NC State Michigan State advance from NCAA Tournament Nationwide Arena

Several college basketball teams saw their NCAA Tournament runs end at Nationwide Arena in Columbus this past weekend. North Carolina State and Michigan State were able to stave off elimination, though, and advance to the Sweet 16.  North Carolina State 66, Georgetown 63 Jason Clark had a chance. The Georgetown senior guard had a shot from the right wing that could have sent the game between the No.3-seeded Hoyas and No.11-seed North Carolina State into overtime as time was expiring. Clark missed, sending the Hoyas (24-9) home and the Wolfpack (24-8) into the Sweet 16 for the first time in seven years on a 66-63 victory in the third round of the Midwest Region in the NCAA Tournament in Columbus. “I felt like (the shot) had a chance. But it was off. We pushed the ball up the court, tried to get a last shot,” Clark said. “I felt like it had a chance, but it didn’t.” N.C. State, led by sophomore forward C.J Leslie, junior forward Scott Wood and senior guard C.J Williams, who scored 14 points a piece, rallied from a 10-point deficit in the first half with balanced scoring and a plethora of offensive rebounds on way to a win. “I’m extremely proud of our team and these young guys. We came back, took the lead, and just how tough-minded they have become. It makes you feel very good as a coach, very proud of them,” N.C. State coach Mark Gottfried said. Junior forward Hollis Thompson dropped 23 points for Georgetown. Clark added 10, while fellow Hoyas’ senior, center Henry Sims, only played 22 minutes due to foul trouble. The first half was full of runs by both teams. Georgetown got out to a 5-3 lead on a floater and a 3-pointer by freshman forward Otto Porter. The Hoyas followed that with a 6-2 run, but not before Sims picked up two fouls, both of which came driving into the lane. Sims was forced to sit for the majority of the remainder of the half, but Georgetown was able to get out to a 25-15 lead with him on the bench, thanks to poor shooting by the Wolfpack and an array of 3-pointers by Clark, freshman forward Greg Whittington and freshman guard Jabril Trawick. “We came out kind of slow. We weren’t up-tempo like we wanted to be,” Leslie said. Around the seven-minute mark, Georgetown coach John Thompson III went with a lineup featuring four freshman and Clark, and N.C. State’s run followed shortly. The Wolfpack outscored Georgetown 15-2 to end the half, with most of their points from inside the paint, and took a 30-27 lead into halftime after a steal and breakaway dunk by sophomore forward CJ Leslie. “We got some fast breaks, got some easy buckets,” Gottfried said. “And then the game started to loosen up for us a little bit better.” N.C. State continued to play tough inside as the second half began. Sims picked up his third foul around the 15-minute mark, and the Wolfpack extended their lead to 45-34 after a jumper went for junior center DeShawn Painter. N.C. State grabbed 17 offensive rebounds in the game. Georgetown rallied with a flurry of buckets by Thompson. With less than two minutes to go, Sims, with four fouls, hit a lay-up, his first points of the game, to cut N.C. State’s lead to three, 62-59. After Wolfpack sophomore guard Lorenzo Brown missed the front-end of a one-an-one, Sims was fouled inside, and hit both free throws to make it 62-61. Wood, a 92 percent free throw shooter coming into the game, only hit 1-of-2 free throws after being fouled, and the Hoyas had a chance to tie the game, but Porter missed a contested jump shot from the base line. Brown was fouled, and hit one of two free throws before Clark’s shot went wide.  Michigan State 65, St. Louis 61 For the 10th time in his career, Michigan State coach Tom Izzo is headed to the Sweet 16, but it didn’t come easy. The top-seeded Spartans (29-7) outlasted No.9-seed Saint Louis (26-8) in a physical battle in the third round of the West Region of the NCAA Tournament in Columbus on Sunday, 65-61. “I don’t know if you would believe this or not, but I thought to myself the game would go just like it went. I didn’t know who would win, but I told my guys I know what good a coach (SLU coach Rick Majerus) is,” Izzo said. MSU senior forward Draymond Green came up big for the Spartan in the win, making play after play in the game’s final moments, finishing with 16 points, 13 rebounds and six assists. Spartan sophomore guard Keith Appling added 19 points, three assists and three rebounds. “I think (Green)’s the best player in the country,” Majerus said. “If I had to take a kid right now to win the national championship, I’d take Draymond Green.” The Billikens hung tough with the Spartans thanks in part to their defensive effort and the play of junior guard Kwamain Mitchell and senior forward Brian Conklin, who scored 13 and 11 points, respectively. “We fought our guts out. (MSU)’s a terrific team. I don’t know that we could have played better,” Majerus said. Physical defense dominated the game’s opening 20 minutes. After back-and-forth scoring, SLU took a 15-11 lead on the Spartans after a 3-pointer by Billikens’ sophomore guard Jordair Jett. It did not take MSU long to regain the lead. The Spartans went on a 13-2 run, capped by a driving finger-roll layup in the lane by Green with just less than four minutes to play in the half. Both teams had opportunities to score in the final minute, but the defenses held strong, and MSU took a 26-21 lead into half time. Coming out of the half, SLU sophomore guard Mike McCall Jr. hit a 3-pointer to bring the Billikens within two, but MSU followed with a 15-8 run to go up, 41-32. After Appling hit an open jump shot, one of the many SLU gave him, MSU went up 49-42 with just under seven minutes to play. “All night they pretty much had me begging to shoot the ball. We got in the huddle in one of our timeouts, Draymond (Green) instilled some confidence in me, told me I was a 41 percent 3-point shooter last year, so shoot the ball,” Appling said. Majerus said he was surprised by Appling’s ability to knock down open jump shots. “Yeah, a little bit,” he said. “I think with Appling, Izzo played it really smart, told him to shoot.” Following Appling’s jumper, Billikens’ sophomore guard Jordair Jett hit a rainbow floater, and on the next possession, got fouled and hit both free throws to make it 49-46. From there, the game went back-and-forth, with both teams scoring and hitting tough shots. With fewer than three minutes to go, Green started to take over. He hit a tough, outside jump shot with 2:47 to play to put MSU up, 55-51. A little more than a minute later, Green drove to the bucket and found Appling wide open in the corner, which he drilled, giving MSU a 58-51 lead with 1:34 remaining in the game. SLU made a couple more shots to keep MSU fans nervous, but the Spartans were able to hold on. read more

Mark Osiecki out as Ohio State mens hockey coach

Mark Osiecki is out as the Ohio State men’s hockey coach. OSU announced Monday morning that Osiecki would not return to his position after three years in Columbus. “We are making a change in our head hockey coaching position,” said OSU athletic director Gene Smith. “There was a difference of opinion over the management of the program that could not be resolved.” Osiecki guided the Buckeyes to a 16-17-7 overall record and 13-10-5 mark in Central Collegiate Hockey Association play before losing to Notre Dame in conference tournament’s semifinals. Osiecki compiled a 46-50-16 record at OSU. According to OSU, associate head hockey coach Steve Rohlik “will be the primary point person for the program, student-athletes and recruits.” Osiecki did not immediately return The Lantern‘s request for comment. read more

Eden Hazard expected to delay Chelsea contract talks

first_imgEden Hazard will likely continue to delay talks over a contract renewal at Chelsea, as the club desperately search for a replacement for Thibaut CourtoisThe Blues are now resigned to losing their first-choice goalkeeper after he failed to report for training once more on Tuesday and have now begun a late frantic search for a replacement.But while Chelsea have accepted that Courtois is now a lost cause, there is still hope that they can convince Hazard to commit his long-term future at the club by signing a new deal.Tammy Abraham, ChelseaChelsea hat-trick hero Tammy Abraham hopes for more Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Tammy Abraham hopes this season will be his big breakthrough at Chelsea after firing his first hat-trick for the club in Saturday’s 5-2 win at Wolves.While the 27-year-old has also expressed an interest in joining Courtois at Real for the new season, the Evening Standard has reported that Hazard has accepted Chelsea’s stance and reported to training yesterday.And with two years remaining on his current £200,000 a week contract, Chelsea feel that they are in a much stronger position to retain Hazard – unlike Courtois, who has less than 12 months on his deal.Maurizio Sarri’s side are prepared to offer Hazard a new £300,000 a week deal in order to ward off the advances of Real but the Belgium captain insists that he is in no rush to commit his future and intends to see how things develop further down the road.last_img read more

Wolves sign Ed Francis and Agboola

first_imgWolverhampton Wanderers have completed the signings of Michael Agboola and Ed Francis during the January transfer window.Agboola, who’s a 17-year-old midfielder, joins the Midlands club from Dagenham & Redbridge after a successful trial.Wolves have paid Manchester City an undisclosed fee for Ed Francis who put pen to paper on a two-half-and-a-half- year deal at the Molineux with the option of a further year.Francis is a product of City’s youth setup and has played at international level with England’s under-19 team.The teenager Is comfortable playing in defence and in midfield, and he’ll immediately link up with Wolves under-23 team.Head of academy player development at Wolves, Scott Sellars knows Francis during his time at City and spoke of his delight at capturing the 19-year-old.Premier LeaguePremier League Betting: Match-day 5 Stuart Heath – September 14, 2019 Going into the Premier League’s match-day five with a gap already beginning to form at the top of the league. We will take a…Sellars said, according to Birmingham Mail: “We looked at what our requirements were moving forward, what we already had, and the opportunity came up where Ed was looking to move on.”“I spoke to some staff there (at Man City) and Ed was always talented from a young age. He can play centre-back, left-back or centre midfield so is very versatile.”“When that quality of player becomes available we have to discuss it to see if it’s a good bit of business for ourselves. We felt moving forward he could really add to the group and at 19 he has a lot of potential.”last_img read more

Tom Walker On What A Time To Be Alive Music As Therapy

first_imgWe caught up with Walker at our Santa Monica, Calif. headquarters to learn more about his upcoming album, how songwriting helps him work through lives challenges, his favorite venue he’s played at, and more.Your debut album What a Time to be Alive comes out soon, October 19th. How are you feeling about putting that out into the world?I’m happy, it’s cool. I’ve been working on it for ages and ages. It feels like it’s in a really good place. The songs are just really strong and I’ve picked up, I think I’ve picked up of like 120 songs, I picked 11. Its 45 minutes of music. Spent ages getting the track list. I know people listen to a lot of stuff on streaming and don’t listen to albums as much these days, but to me, a proper artist has a proper album. I wanted to make sure the flow and the mix of everything, the continuity, was all one thing and it was fluid and I feel like I’ve gotten there. We’ve been a bit pushed for time because we’ve had 150 gigs this year. If I’ve not been out on the road, I’ve been in the studio and it’s just been back and forth and back and forth, crazy. I’m really excited and I’m really happy, which I didn’t think I’d be, I thought I’d be super nervous, but I feel like I’m ready to put it out into the world and see what everybody thinks.How do you feel working on this album versus your EP that you came out with; how is the creative process different?With this album, I went with three different producers. I worked with Jim Abbiss who I made the Blessings EP with, Steve Mark who I did two of the singles with and Mike Spencer who I’ve done a couple of the singles and some of the album tracks. It’s a really amazing opportunity and quite rare to work with three producers of that caliber, at this stage in your career, when you’ve had one big song out. You know what I mean? It was such a cool experience and all three are really different and really unique in their own ways and brought the best out of me in a few different ways. It was really cool. I love being in studio, I really enjoy it. I’m a bit of a studio guy, if I’m not out on tour, I wanna be in the studio. As soon as I’m in the studio for too long, I wanna be out on tour. It’s been a good balance, doing that for the whole album. It feels good.Speaking of hit single, “Leave a Light On” is very emotionally stirring and has caught the attention of a lot of people worldwide. I read that it was about real people in your life. How has songwriting helped you process things that you’ve gone through in life? Have you gotten feedback from fans that your music has also helped them?I feel like songwriting, for me, is kind of therapy. If I do have issues and I do have troubles, the best way to work it out is to write a song about it. I think you mentally just internalize the problem and somehow, you just get through it a little quicker. That’s for me, that’s probably why I’m a songwriter, you know? It’s not gonna work for everybody. I just find, putting it on paper really helps it. And “Leave A Light On” in particular is about a friend of mine, who kind of had a bit of an addiction problem. I had messages from people all over the world saying they had a brother or a sister or a parent or a friend or anybody who’s gone through a similar thing and this song’s helped them get through something and when I wrote it, I never really expected that. It’s been a really cool side effect of writing the song. Other people have had issues and it’s helped them through it. It’s kind of cool that music does that. I never really thought of that when I wrote it. I didn’t expect the reaction that it got, it’s cool.I’ve had a few people come up to me as well and tell me some pretty tragic, heartbreaking stories. It’s always nice to meet people who’ve had their own experiences with the song and got through something pretty tough. Makes you feel good about what you’re doing. Because I think the music industry can feel a little selfish sometimes, like everything’s about you, but it’s nice to actually be helping some people through some stuff.You mentioned that you’ve been touring a lot. You’re finishing up your tour in the U.S., you’ve played Glastonbury – what’s your favorite show that you’ve played so far?Favorite show? There’s been loads this year. I think Coco in London. I was so nervous cause it was the biggest venue we’d ever played in London and we sold it out super quickly. All of the label and all of my publishers and everybody came down, all my friends who I wrote the songs with and producers that I worked with, everybody was there. It was super nerve-racking, but it was amazing.Glastonbury was special as well because I finished by set, which I could only do acoustically, I couldn’t even get tickets for the band. I basically got offered the slot because I already bought a ticket for the festival. I didn’t have any help with my gear but this little trailer and had my guitar amplifier and my acoustic, I was lugging it through Glastonbury.It took an hour and an half to get it from my car to the stage, and then from the stage back to the car, another hour and an half. So like three hours for the day, just getting there and back. I did the set and it was amazing, the tent was full, which I couldn’t believe because there’s so many amazing artists playing at Glastonbury, I was like, “Well, nobody’s gonna come and fill this tent up”, but they did and it was great. Then as soon as I came out and finished my set, Elbow, which is like one of my favorite bands, were doing a secret set on the stage right there. So, I literally finished, put my gear away, came out, and they started their show and I just sat and watched it. I was like, how cool is this? I just finished my first set at Glastonbury and then I’ve come out and I’ve watched one of my favorite bands play a secret gig. That was pretty special. News Tom Walker On ‘What A Time To Be Alive,’ Music As Therapy & More Facebook The singer/songwriter tells us about his upcoming debut album, how songwriting is a therapeutic process for him, what it was like to play Glastonbury, and moreAna YglesiasGRAMMYs Sep 14, 2018 – 12:24 pm U.K.-based singer/songwriter Tom Walker’s debut full-length album What a Time to Be Alive is coming out on Oct. 19, and he’s pretty thrilled about it. A single he released last year “Leave a Light On,” a touching, emotionally-charged track that he wrote about a friend dealing with a substance problem, has already gained him an international following.It is clear that music has been Walker’s lifeblood since his early days listening to Michael Jackson’s Thriller on this dad’s record player as a kid, and that he is ecstatic to be sharing his passion—his music—with the world. Twitter NETWORK ERRORCannot Contact ServerRELOAD YOUR SCREEN OR TRY SELECTING A DIFFERENT VIDEO Sep 14, 2018 – 11:46 am Singer/songwriter Tom Walker On Music As Therapy https://twitter.com/IamTomWalker/status/1039872093637079040 Email Tom Walker On Music As Therapy & More tom-walker-what-time-be-alive-music-therapy-more I heard Thriller was one of your favorite albums growing up, and perhaps still is?Yeah, I don’t listen to it as much these days, but it’s the first thing I remember ever hearing on vinyl. My dad had a pretty cool stereo at the time. My sister, unfortunately blew it up at a house party. Thriller was one of the first things I can remember dancing to around the living room, as a kid to and just being really scared, you know all the sounds effects that they put in that song and the speech at the end of it. It was really frightening when you were a kid. I just thought that was really cool.Growing up listening to music, did you know that was what you wanted to be an artist, or how did that change as you grew up and started pursuing music? I thought I wanted to be a guitarist, not an artist. I didn’t start singing and writing songs properly until I was 19. I think I was quite late to the party, in that sense. I’ve since made up for it, but I just loved guitar. I was a massive fan of AC/DC, Foo Fighters, Muse – I went to see all of them live. B.B. King, Chuck Berry, I love Ray Charles, I just like a bit of everything. I always was fascinated by music and when I saw my favorite bands doing a live show or seeing them on TV, I just thought “That looks so much fun.” I kind of wanted to pursue some form of that, I didn’t realize I would end up being an artist and being a songwriter and a singer. It just kind of all fell into place naturally, which was nice. I never really forced or didn’t set out to be like “I wanna be famous,” I just wanted to play music.You studied music in college. Do you think the degree helped prepare you for working in the music industry?I think the degree was really interesting because, in England it’s not free to go to university, but they lend you the money. It’s the best loan you’ll ever get. It’s a bit harder now, but when I was doing it at the time, it was fairly easy to get it. It just gave me three years to really focus on songwriting. The degree was good, but I felt there was bits of it that really weren’t that relevant to the industry. It could’ve been better in that sense. It’s an amazing degree, but actually getting into the industry, there was loads of things that they never told or warned us about, but it gave me the time to really build my craft. The songwriting teachers there were amazing. Really helped me with the songwriting, for sure. Also, I had Logic lessons, which really helped me recording and getting to production and stuff like that. The kind of music business side of it wasn’t really there, but the rest of it was great.Is there kind of like a dream collaboration that you have in the near future or?I’d love to write a song with Paolo Nutini. I’ve loved all of his albums so far and I love his voice. He was born in Scotland, I was also born in Scotland. I’ve always wanted to meet him, but he doesn’t really gig or do many shows. I’ve never actually seen him live and he’s one of my favorite artists. Every time I look online, he’s not doing anything. I feel like I’ve missed out. I should’ve gone when he was gigging, but hopefully he’ll come back with an album in another two years after like five years, whatever its been and it’ll be absolutely banging and he’ll go out and do a tour and I might hopefully see him on the circuit one day.The Shadowboxers On Working With Justin Timberlake, Covers & New MusicRead morelast_img read more

2020 Audi S6 gets its USmarket pricing still no Avant though

first_img6:29 Audi’s corporate grille keeps getting bigger, but so does the S6’s performance. We’ll let it slide. Audi We’ve known the specs of the forthcoming 2020 Audi S6 for a while now, for both European and US models, but one thing we’ve been kept in the dark on was just how much it’d cost stateside. Not anymore. Audi on Thursday announced US pricing for its hotted-up midsizer, and we’re definitely interested.So just how much can you expect to shell out for your fancy German Q-ship? For the entry-level Premium Plus trim, you’ll spend $73,900, which actually compares favorably with the E53 AMG, which is only slightly cheaper but down 15 hp and a whopping 59 pound-feet of torque. Step up to the top-level Prestige trim at $77,800, and you’re more in BMW M550i xDrive territory, where the S6 is way down on power compared with the 4.4-liter turbo V8 in the Bimmer.Unlike the Euro model, our S6 will run on gasoline and be powered by the same 2.9-liter V6 engine that produces an extremely healthy 444 horsepower and 443 pound-feet of torque in the Audi RS 5. It’s is a very healthy if not wildly exciting powerplant, but this car isn’t exactly meant to be a hooligan. Unfortunately, there’s still no sign of the nerd-catnip Avant wagon version coming to the US.Some of the other highlights of the 2020 S6 include a 48-volt mild hybrid system that powers (among other things) an electric compressor that seeks to eliminate or at the very least drastically reduce turbo lag, making the engine more responsive. The compressor spins at a slow-compared-with-a-turbo 70,000 rpm but has a superfast 250-millisecond response time.The S6, of course, gets Quattro all-wheel drive and Audi’s latest eight-speed Tiptronic gearbox as standard and there will be an optional S sport package, for those drivers who want to turn the wick up a bit on a back road. Audi More From Roadshow 2019 BMW 330i xDrive review: The new and improved 3 Series 2020 Audi S6 gives the sedan a dash of sport 2019 Mercedes-AMG E53 Sedan review: A breath of fresh(er) air Share your voice 0 2019 Audi RS5 Sportback is a goody two-shoes 2020 BMW 7 Series first drive: Travel comfortably and carry a big grille Performance Cars Luxury cars Sedans Now playing: Watch this: Tags 39 Photos Post a comment Audilast_img read more