Moville campaigners protest following construction drilling pontoon on Lough Foyle

first_imgThe Community For A Clean Estuary (CFCE) in north Inishowen called a protest on short notice on Monday over the construction of a drilling pontoon on Lough Foyle.The protest at Carrickarory Pier in Moville follows years of concern on the proposed Moville sewerage system by Irish Water. A spokesperson for the CFCE said: “A protest was called at short notice by the CFCE to assemble at Carrickarory Pier in Moville to register our concerns over the proposal by Irish Water to continue with their proposal to discharge sewage effluent into Lough Foyle at Carnagarve adjacent to the bathing beaches and shore walk.“The fact that this proposal is a serious threat to Moville and Greencastle’s most valuable asset cuts no ice as they plough on regardless.”“Unanimous decisions by all County and Inishowen Councillors to locate plant and pipe north of Greencastle has fallen on deaf ears as Irish Water behave as if they are a law unto themselves as they bulldoze on.“The fact that the CFCE discovered a hidden map ( produced by Donegal County Cl ) showing raw sewage hugging the coastline from Redcastle to Kinnago Bay in the event of an emergency discharge is being ignored.” Moville campaigners protest following construction drilling pontoon on Lough Foyle was last modified: July 29th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

10 months agoJorge de Frutos trains with senior Real Madrid squad: Just 2 years after playing street football

first_imgAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Jorge de Frutos trains with senior Real Madrid squad: Just 2 years after playing street footballby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveJorge de Frutos has been training with the Real Madrid senior squad this week.Suspension rules De Frutos out of Castilla action this weekend and, as a result, Santiago Solari allowed him to train with the first team as he made up the numbers.A Madrid fan since birth, the player was without a club until he turned 16, having spent his younger years playing futsal on the streets of his hometown, Navares de Enmedio.Rayo Majadahonda took a chance by signing him into the Castilian regional leagues before he moved on at 18 to play in the Segunda B for two season, helping the side achieve promotion last year.And there was no hesitation when his agent, Juanma Lopes, informed him of Real Madrid’s offer. last_img read more

Jim Boeheim On Post-Season Ban: “I’d Rather Take The Punishment And Let The Players Go To The Tournament”

first_imgJim Boeheim not happy with a call.DETROIT, MI – MARCH 18: Head coach Jim Boeheim of the Syracuse Orange reacts during the first half against the Michigan State Spartans in the second round of the 2018 NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament at Little Caesars Arena on March 18, 2018 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)Syracuse’s self-imposed NCAA Tournament ban has helped spark a lot of debate about the efficacy of NCAA post-season bans, which almost always wind up punishing players who are not involved in the violations at hand. Many believe the punishment should be levied against coaches and administrators, including ESPN’s Dan Dakich, who believes that Jim Boeheim, and not Rakeem Christmas, Mike Gbinije, and company, should be the one banned from the tournament. Dakich had Boeheim on his radio show, and the legendary Syracuse coach agrees with his idea.Jimmy B on @dandakich “I’d rather take the punishment and let the players go to the tournament, I’ve been to the tournament” @BrentAxeMedia— Justin Hardie (@jhardie13) February 25, 2015While it is too late for this Syracuse team, last night’s win at Notre Dame gives the program two wins over Top 12 teams in the last week, and the Orange would probably be right on the bubble if they were eligible. Punishing a coach who was present, even if he may or may not have been aware of alleged violations, makes far more sense than taking this opportunity away from the innocent players.last_img read more

Girl on school ski trip in southern Alberta hits pole dies in

first_imgPINCHER CREEK, Alta. – A 10-year-old girl has died after striking a pole while she was on a school ski trip in southwestern Alberta.The Grade 6 student at Canyon Elementary School in Pincher Creek was on the planned outing Tuesday at the nearby Castle Mountain resort.She had taken a mandatory ski lesson in the morning with other students, said resort spokesman Jason Crawford“We have school groups almost every day,” he said Wednesday. “Once they’re through their lesson, they’re able to ski on the hill.”The school provided chaperones, either teachers or parents, he added.He didn’t know the girl’s level of ski experience but said she had skied at the resort before.The resort is investigating the accident, Crawford said, and it appears the girl was alone on a beginner run when she lost control and went off the run. She struck a wooden pole that was part of a fence marking an out-of-bounds area.Two other students witnessed the crash and went to get help, said RCMP Sgt. Mark Harrison.He said the girl was wearing a helmet but suffered serious head injuries.Resort staff provided first aid before paramedics arrived. Because of strong winds and snow, she could not be air-lifted to hospital, Harrison said.She was taken by ground ambulance to the Alberta Children’s Hospital in Calgary, where she was later pronounced dead.The Livingstone Range School Division said in a statement that it is providing counselling to students at the school and at other division schools.“The Canyon School Community is devastated by this loss,” said Canyon School principal Paul Pichurski.“We send our heartfelt condolences to the family.”last_img read more

Canadas provinces promote free trade in Washington Some conditions apply

first_imgWASHINGTON – The premiers of Canada’s two largest provinces came to Washington on Friday to sing the praises of free trade: lower prices, more jobs, better selection at the grocery store and supply chains that create geo-political bonds.But that trade-liberalizing passion comes with some caveats.The premiers of Quebec and Ontario acknowledged that their own trade practices are not perfectly open in every sector and will not suddenly become that way in a newly renegotiated North American Free Trade Agreement.In one exchange, the governor of Colorado voiced a desire for freer trade in dairy. He made the request on a panel while seated beside Kathleen Wynne and Philippe Couillard — premiers of the two main dairy-producing provinces in a country that limits dairy imports.“Colorado is a big cheese-manufacturing state. So I’d probably want to negotiate a little bit about the cheese,” said Gov. John Hickenlooper.“Because we all have our specific things that we think, maybe, aren’t quite as fair.”Dairy isn’t the only protected sector in Canada. So is poultry. In addition, sub-national jurisdictions protect certain types of government contracts. Also, Couillard said it’s important for Quebec to maintain protections on cultural products in order to preserve its francophone culture.Couillard said it’s normal to maintain some protections in a trade deal.“I would say, tongue in cheek, there’s no such thing as a free-trade agreement. There are trade agreements with exceptions and specificities — ones countries need to keep in order to keep their policies and priorities moving forward,” Couillard told a panel at the Washington International Trade Association.“So, (let’s proceed with) modernizing (NAFTA). Keeping each others’ interests in perspective. Being able to put yourself in the other person’s shoes — to understand why (certain sectors are) so important… But overall let’s keep markets open.”On government procurement, Couillard told reporters he’s considering whether to speed up planned renovations of Montreal metro cars in order to provide work for Bombardier, as layoffs are threatened there.States and provinces have the right to exempt certain public agencies from competitive bidding under WTO rules, although Canada entered these NAFTA negotiations hoping to expand free trade for public contracts with the giant U.S. market.The U.S. has taken the opposite approach — it’s looking to limit trade in public works. That’s one of several controversial proposals from the Americans, who have also proposed creating a so-called sunset clause that could end NAFTA every five years.Wynne said this negotiation has been unusual.“Do I think there needs to be some systematic approach to reviewing (NAFTA)? I think we can all agree,” she said.“(But) what has triggered this review is not a systematic or rational process. That was not a political comment. But if there were a way to have a more rational (five-year) trigger, I think that would make sense.”Events a few kilometres away underscored her point.As Wynne was speaking at that panel, U.S. President Donald Trump was just outside the city at a conservative political conference where, in his speech to partisans, he trashed NAFTA.“NAFTA is no good. It never was any good. But, for some reason, nobody ever changed it,” Trump said.“They emptied our factories. You’ve got to see the car plants and the auto plants in Mexico. Like, you’ve never seen anything like it before. I want those companies — and they’re starting — I want them back here.”Ironically, he was saying this at a conference made famous by Ronald Reagan — the conservative favourite who spearheaded North American free-trade talks. Meanwhile, in downtown Washington, D.C., the premiers were promoting NAFTA inside the Ronald Reagan Building.The premiers are in Washington for the annual winter conference of state governors. State leaders have proven to be influential allies to people trying save NAFTA — writing letters, lobbying U.S. President Donald Trump and sharing their concerns with Vice-President Mike Pence.Couillard said he and his Ontario counterpart have met dozens of U.S. governors since last year — and every one supports NAFTA. He said they understand the benefits of free trade — cheaper fruits and vegetables available throughout the year, minerals from Canada that supply manufacturing in the southern U.S., an integrated defence-industrial base and nine million jobs linked to trade in the U.S. alone.“Open markets create jobs,” Couillard said. “Closed markets kill jobs. … Closed markets increase prices, for people who have economic difficulties.”He urged the countries to reach a quick agreement. He said businesses hate uncertainty, and said the uncertainty at some point needs to end.Projections from Scotiabank and the Bank of Canada estimate that if ambiguity lingers over NAFTA into next year, the ensuing investment concerns would reduce Canada’s GDP by about one-fifth of one per cent through 2019.last_img read more

Even Pretending To Be A Professional Tennis Player Is Terrifying

CARL BIALIK STATSMOJJOMOJJO NEWCARL CHARTING Based on my experience covering tennis, professional players usually remember to bring their tennis shoes to the court. On a June Thursday, as I walked into Courbevoie Sport Tennis outside of Paris, I realized I hadn’t. I was there to try out a new technology from Mojjo — a French company that makes what Emmanuel Witvoet, one of its founders, calls “Hawk-Eye for everyone.” Hawk-Eye is the advanced camera-based system that tennis tournaments use to adjudicate disputed line calls and to provide advanced stats for television. It’s sophisticated, impressive and expensive — out of reach for most amateurs, in part because it uses 10 cameras. Witvoet said he and his co-founders had figured out how to do much of what Hawk-Eye does with just one camera, making it affordable for the masses.Unlike the masses, pro players have ready access to the kind of data that Mojjo was about to provide me. They get all sorts of detailed stats after every match, and at tournaments like Wimbledon, they get more. After matches, they receive DVDs that allow them to toggle between points or watch only, say, their backhand errors. It’s not easy for amateurs like me to get that kind of information, but we are clamoring for it. Some 70 million fitness trackers like Fitbit were bought last year, and smart watches like Apple’s bundle fitness tracking with their smartphone features. In tennis, rackets from Babolat and racket attachments from Sony measure things like spin and speed of shot — but their accuracy is questionable.Now, for one surreal, amazing, frustrating and delusion-shattering morning, I would finally have the data. A camera would capture the flight of the ball, software would analyze what happened on each point, and detailed match stats — my detailed match stats — would be put online. I was treated like a pro, but the data showed me how far I had to go to play like one.My friend Alex Duff came along to help me test Mojjo out. Duff is a data geek and amateur tennis player who once recorded video of one of our matches so we could review our performance later. For this match, we were instead armed with two laptops — so that we could each predict the match stats beforehand.After telling the Mojjo courtside kiosk which of us was serving first, Duff and I took the court atop a light dusting of red clay, the same kind of stuff the pros would play on later that day at the French Open five miles away.I told Duff not to be too self-conscious even though a camera was running. I then proceeded to be incredibly self-conscious because a camera was running. I can’t remember starting another match as poorly as I did this one. My head was full of excuses, and I felt self-conscious every time a club employee walked on court, which was often: I felt his eyes staring at my shoes, as if he were the Mona Lisa.Mojjo was the main problem. I’d recently read the classic book “The Inner Game of Tennis” and knew I was supposed to think less and clear my mind. I didn’t — and instead was rushing during points. Silver lining: That meant we’d play more points in our allotted two hours, and more points meant more data.Despite my struggles, I won the first set 6-3. And after extending my winning streak to six straight games, I started to consider secondary goals, like looking good for the camera. I couldn’t do much about my sweat-stained shirt, but I could at least retuck my shorts pocket after pulling out a ball for a second serve. I promptly lost eight straight points.I started playing a little better and went up 5-3 in the second set. That’s when we played our best game of the match by far. We both hit winners and saved game points. After four deuces, I closed out the set. I asked for one more — and cruised to a 6-0 win.Then the email containing our stats arrived from Mojjo, and our amateur match suddenly felt like an official one. We had numbers that looked, if you squinted sideways, like numbers from the pros. We each had one ace. I hit four double-faults; he hit five. We each made a little over 50 percent of our first serves. These weren’t crazy numbers for a clay-court match by pros. Andy Murray and David Ferrer, two of the best players in the world, had just put up roughly similar numbers in their match at the French Open the day before.The video uploaded to Mojjo’s site later that day, and it was odd — not only because it depicted my awkward-looking one-handed backhand. At times, it showed scores that didn’t make much sense and seemed to include shots hit after rallies were over, like to get a ball back to the server, as part of the match.When I could get past the technical hiccups, I saw that unlike the emailed stats, which could have passed for professional-grade, the video looked nothing like match footage I was used to watching. Even with the unusual perspective of the single-camera wide shot, it was clear that my strokes weren’t Grand Slam-ready. And the tennis looked like it was being played at half-speed. Our bodies and the ball crept through the frame — even when the video wasn’t glitching. Second-serve returns in percentage81%81%81% Double-faults455 First-serve returns in percentage77%78%85% Second-serve in percentage89%87%86% Percentage of all points won61%61%61% Aces101 Special Podcast: Check out Baseline, a U.S. Open mini-podcast with Carl Bialik, Louisa Thomas of Grantland, and others from the National Tennis Center grounds. Listen here, and subscribe to the FiveThirtyEight sports podcast Hot Takedown on iTunes now so you don’t miss an episode! First-serve win percentage64%61%57% Break points of opponent’s serve202012 Win percentage for rallies of 10+ shots100%50%33% Win percentage for rallies of 1-3 shots60%61%64% Mojjo isn’t the only tennis tracker around. An Israeli company named PlaySight uses four cameras to Mojjo’s one, and its technology is more mature: Clubs have already installed it in about 130 courts. It provides a glimpse of what Mojjo could eventually do and of how a more advanced system could do things for amateurs that even some pros don’t get.Over Skype, PlaySight’s CEO and co-founder, Chen M. Shachar, said his system cost $10,000 per court — about three times what Mojjo will charge — plus a license fee for each facility. As is the case with Mojjo, the club, not the player, pays the PlaySight fee. But clubs most likely pass this cost on to players through higher per-match prices.Shachar said PlaySight has much bigger plans. For instance, he said the software eventually will be able to compare, say, me to its database of other players and tell me how my serve, backhand and other shots compare with the averages. And he envisions an improvement on current systems for remote coaching, which require coaching companies to download and tag video: I could instead share my PlaySight account — including video and data — with a top coach on the other side of the world. That’s better than pros can do when they’re playing on courts without Hawk-Eye.PlaySight already can do things Mojjo doesn’t immediately plan on. For instance, PlaySight live-streams matches. And its courtside kiosks provide in-match stats and video replay. It also offers a level of precision that makes it possible to review line calls, which Mojjo doesn’t.While Mojjo lacks the precision to make line calls with certainty, its camera nonetheless gave me a rare chance to review my own calls. Pros don’t call their own lines, but amateurs like Duff and I do. And I could tell while watching the raw video of my match that I’d made some questionable out calls.That’s not the only lesson I learned from my experience with Mojjo. My serve and volley stinks — I won 25 percent of those points, and that was lucky. My backhand is much weaker than my forehand (43 percent on backhands without slice vs. 63 percent on forehands without slice). I also landed fewer first serves than I predicted I would — and that I thought I had right after the match.I wasn’t nearly as good at intuiting stats while playing a match as I’d thought. Shachar said this isn’t unusual for people in high-stress activities — including sports and higher-stakes contests. PlaySight founders adapted their tennis platform from one they developed to allow fighter pilots to review their actions. “The gap between what really happened and what you think happened is huge,” Shachar said.2Pros, too, can have trouble tracking stats in their head. Gilles Simon, one of the most stat-conscious men on tour, said after defeating big-serving Milos Raonic at the Queen’s Club tournament in London last month that he’d thought Raonic had landed the vast majority of his first serves in the first set, only to learn when looking at the scoreboard between sets that Raonic had made just 52 percent.On the plus side, I learned that statistically, tennis looks pretty similar when played by two people of similar ability, no matter what that ability is. I even found a match that had roughly similar stats and scoreline to my match with Duff. It happened 15 years ago at Wimbledon. The winner was Fabrice Santoro, who like me had unconventional strokes.3He also had the very cool nickname “The Little Magician.” The loser was Andrea Gaudenzi, which sounds a little like Alex Duff in Italian.4To find a similar match, I examined stats from 12,379 best-of-five-set matches made available on GitHub by Sackmann. Then I zeroed in on the 855 straight-set wins with scores closest to ours of 6-3, 6-3, 6-0. Finally, I calculated z-scores for 15 stats in our match and for each of the 12,379 pro matches: seven for each player (ace percentage, double-fault percentage, percentage of first serves that went in, percentage of first-serve points won, percentage of second-serve points won, break points against, and break points converted against), plus the dominance ratio (the ratio of the percentage of return points won to the percentage of serve points lost by the winner of the match). I summed the absolute value of the difference of the z-score for each of the 15 categories for our match and for each of the 855 matches. Santoro d. Gaudenzi came out the closest. Pros: They’re just like us.I also came to a fairly obvious realization that nonetheless troubled me. Before my Mojjo match, I considered myself a smart player, adjusting my tactics to take advantage of each opponent’s weaknesses. But with Mojjo, whatever I learned, my opponent would too — we’d both get the same stat sheets. For instance, from my charting, Duff landed 22 serves directed at my forehand and lost 20 of those points. If he notices that stat, he probably won’t serve to my forehand nearly so often the next time we play. Maybe having post-match stats would help my opponents more than me, by removing what I think is my tactical advantage from having an approximate handle on what’s working and what’s not. There’s also the risk I’d overthink things; even pros like Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic said in media conferences at Wimbledon this year that they don’t normally look at their own stats in too much detail.But even if data can’t improve my game, my curiosity is stronger than my competitiveness. Now that I’ve experienced what very few players have, it’s been hard to go back. Each match uncharted feels like a lost opportunity to learn more about my game — including just how ugly my backhand is. While I wait for Mojjo to fix its bugs and come to courts near me, I’m awfully tempted to start filming and charting my matches myself.Maybe I’ll use a GoPro. Win percentage for rallies of 4-6 shots60%61%61% First-serve in percentage53%51%58% Win percentage for rallies of 7-9 shots54%54%50% Second-serve win percentage50%51%54% Break points converted151510 The next day, Witvoet, Duff and I met at the picnic tables outside Court Suzanne-Lenglen. Witvoet acknowledged that there were plenty of bugs still to work out. He and his fellow 30-something co-founders — Charles Chevalier, the chief technology officer, and Julien Vernay, the chief operations officer — had just installed Mojjo permanently at the club the prior week. “You are one of the early birds,” Witvoet said. “As you’ve seen, it’s not all polished. We know definitely it’s not totally ready.”After matches, the founders compare the footage from the Mojjo camera to the stats and use any discrepancies to hone the system. On their to-do list: a voice-recognition system that detects when players call balls out; social sharing of points so you can, for example, brag about an ace on Facebook, with video; and a gamified system so coaches can set statistical targets — like hitting a higher percentage of service returns in the court — and players can collect badges for achieving them. They’re also considering a pure software version that will allow players to use Mojjo to analyze footage they’ve shot themselves. “Our idea is, in some future, you GoPro yourself, and it’s done,” Witvoet said.Because of the video problems, Witvoet agreed to share with me the raw video of the match. I decided to check the stats for myself. I used a system developed by Jeff Sackmann for his Match Charting Project, which has enlisted volunteers to chart nearly 1,000 pro matches. During my Eurostar trip from Paris back home to London, I alt-tabbed between the video and the spreadsheet to log every shot — its type, direction and outcome.1For example, for one long rally I lost, I entered 4f29b2f2f3b2b2f+1f1# into a cell in the spreadsheet. Then I compared the results with Mojjo’s. They were off, in some cases by a lot.Duff hit 13 double-faults by my count, not the five Mojjo counted. I was making more first serves, but losing those points more often than Mojjo said. Both Duff and I were making more first-serve returns than estimated. And the break-point stats were way off for Mojjo, off even from the realm of possibility: The system showed that I’d faced five break points but been broken six times. (I counted four breaks off nine break points.) When Mojjo rolled out the next version of its software, correcting for problems reading high balls, and applied it to our match video, some but not all of these stats were more accurate — you can see just how accurate for my stats in the table adjacent to this paragraph. Chevalier estimated that the error rate on who won each point was below 5 percent. Score one for humanity over machine, so far at least, when it comes to logging tennis stats. But also score one for the pros, that special subset of humans who have someone doing the statkeeping for them. read more

NC State Michigan State advance from NCAA Tournament Nationwide Arena

Several college basketball teams saw their NCAA Tournament runs end at Nationwide Arena in Columbus this past weekend. North Carolina State and Michigan State were able to stave off elimination, though, and advance to the Sweet 16.  North Carolina State 66, Georgetown 63 Jason Clark had a chance. The Georgetown senior guard had a shot from the right wing that could have sent the game between the No.3-seeded Hoyas and No.11-seed North Carolina State into overtime as time was expiring. Clark missed, sending the Hoyas (24-9) home and the Wolfpack (24-8) into the Sweet 16 for the first time in seven years on a 66-63 victory in the third round of the Midwest Region in the NCAA Tournament in Columbus. “I felt like (the shot) had a chance. But it was off. We pushed the ball up the court, tried to get a last shot,” Clark said. “I felt like it had a chance, but it didn’t.” N.C. State, led by sophomore forward C.J Leslie, junior forward Scott Wood and senior guard C.J Williams, who scored 14 points a piece, rallied from a 10-point deficit in the first half with balanced scoring and a plethora of offensive rebounds on way to a win. “I’m extremely proud of our team and these young guys. We came back, took the lead, and just how tough-minded they have become. It makes you feel very good as a coach, very proud of them,” N.C. State coach Mark Gottfried said. Junior forward Hollis Thompson dropped 23 points for Georgetown. Clark added 10, while fellow Hoyas’ senior, center Henry Sims, only played 22 minutes due to foul trouble. The first half was full of runs by both teams. Georgetown got out to a 5-3 lead on a floater and a 3-pointer by freshman forward Otto Porter. The Hoyas followed that with a 6-2 run, but not before Sims picked up two fouls, both of which came driving into the lane. Sims was forced to sit for the majority of the remainder of the half, but Georgetown was able to get out to a 25-15 lead with him on the bench, thanks to poor shooting by the Wolfpack and an array of 3-pointers by Clark, freshman forward Greg Whittington and freshman guard Jabril Trawick. “We came out kind of slow. We weren’t up-tempo like we wanted to be,” Leslie said. Around the seven-minute mark, Georgetown coach John Thompson III went with a lineup featuring four freshman and Clark, and N.C. State’s run followed shortly. The Wolfpack outscored Georgetown 15-2 to end the half, with most of their points from inside the paint, and took a 30-27 lead into halftime after a steal and breakaway dunk by sophomore forward CJ Leslie. “We got some fast breaks, got some easy buckets,” Gottfried said. “And then the game started to loosen up for us a little bit better.” N.C. State continued to play tough inside as the second half began. Sims picked up his third foul around the 15-minute mark, and the Wolfpack extended their lead to 45-34 after a jumper went for junior center DeShawn Painter. N.C. State grabbed 17 offensive rebounds in the game. Georgetown rallied with a flurry of buckets by Thompson. With less than two minutes to go, Sims, with four fouls, hit a lay-up, his first points of the game, to cut N.C. State’s lead to three, 62-59. After Wolfpack sophomore guard Lorenzo Brown missed the front-end of a one-an-one, Sims was fouled inside, and hit both free throws to make it 62-61. Wood, a 92 percent free throw shooter coming into the game, only hit 1-of-2 free throws after being fouled, and the Hoyas had a chance to tie the game, but Porter missed a contested jump shot from the base line. Brown was fouled, and hit one of two free throws before Clark’s shot went wide.  Michigan State 65, St. Louis 61 For the 10th time in his career, Michigan State coach Tom Izzo is headed to the Sweet 16, but it didn’t come easy. The top-seeded Spartans (29-7) outlasted No.9-seed Saint Louis (26-8) in a physical battle in the third round of the West Region of the NCAA Tournament in Columbus on Sunday, 65-61. “I don’t know if you would believe this or not, but I thought to myself the game would go just like it went. I didn’t know who would win, but I told my guys I know what good a coach (SLU coach Rick Majerus) is,” Izzo said. MSU senior forward Draymond Green came up big for the Spartan in the win, making play after play in the game’s final moments, finishing with 16 points, 13 rebounds and six assists. Spartan sophomore guard Keith Appling added 19 points, three assists and three rebounds. “I think (Green)’s the best player in the country,” Majerus said. “If I had to take a kid right now to win the national championship, I’d take Draymond Green.” The Billikens hung tough with the Spartans thanks in part to their defensive effort and the play of junior guard Kwamain Mitchell and senior forward Brian Conklin, who scored 13 and 11 points, respectively. “We fought our guts out. (MSU)’s a terrific team. I don’t know that we could have played better,” Majerus said. Physical defense dominated the game’s opening 20 minutes. After back-and-forth scoring, SLU took a 15-11 lead on the Spartans after a 3-pointer by Billikens’ sophomore guard Jordair Jett. It did not take MSU long to regain the lead. The Spartans went on a 13-2 run, capped by a driving finger-roll layup in the lane by Green with just less than four minutes to play in the half. Both teams had opportunities to score in the final minute, but the defenses held strong, and MSU took a 26-21 lead into half time. Coming out of the half, SLU sophomore guard Mike McCall Jr. hit a 3-pointer to bring the Billikens within two, but MSU followed with a 15-8 run to go up, 41-32. After Appling hit an open jump shot, one of the many SLU gave him, MSU went up 49-42 with just under seven minutes to play. “All night they pretty much had me begging to shoot the ball. We got in the huddle in one of our timeouts, Draymond (Green) instilled some confidence in me, told me I was a 41 percent 3-point shooter last year, so shoot the ball,” Appling said. Majerus said he was surprised by Appling’s ability to knock down open jump shots. “Yeah, a little bit,” he said. “I think with Appling, Izzo played it really smart, told him to shoot.” Following Appling’s jumper, Billikens’ sophomore guard Jordair Jett hit a rainbow floater, and on the next possession, got fouled and hit both free throws to make it 49-46. From there, the game went back-and-forth, with both teams scoring and hitting tough shots. With fewer than three minutes to go, Green started to take over. He hit a tough, outside jump shot with 2:47 to play to put MSU up, 55-51. A little more than a minute later, Green drove to the bucket and found Appling wide open in the corner, which he drilled, giving MSU a 58-51 lead with 1:34 remaining in the game. SLU made a couple more shots to keep MSU fans nervous, but the Spartans were able to hold on. read more

Womens Soccer Ohio State ties 00 with No 21 Rutgers

Ohio State senior goalkeeper Devon Kerr (1) prepares to take a goal kick in the second half of the game against Florida Gulf Coast University on Sept. 7. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorThe Ohio State women’s soccer team (7-5-2, 4-2-2 Big Ten) drew a 0-0 tie with No. 21 Rutgers (9-1-5, 5-1-3 Big Ten) this Friday evening on alumni weekend at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium.With neither team able to score in the first 45 minutes of the game, the score was tied 0-0 at the end of regulation. Rutgers finished the day with 20 total shots, but with only two shots on goal. Freshman forward Kayla Fischer, senior forward Eleanor Gabriel and senior midfielder Sarah Roberts combined for six of Ohio State’s eight total shots, with Fischer and Roberts each recording a shot on goal. Then, the Buckeyes and the Scarlet Knights went into overtime, but couldn’t find either opponents net. Rutgers freshman goalie Megan McClelland and Ohio State senior goalie Devon Kerr both ended the match with two saves and a pair of clean sheets.Last weekend, the Buckeyes fell 1-0 to the Wolverines in Ann Arbor, but then won 1-0 in a match against the Spartans. The Buckeyes will look to come out on top against Maryland this Sunday at 2 p.m. when they return to Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. read more

Nedved hails the legendary Juventus

first_imgVice-chairman Pavel Nedved has hailed the “legendary” Juventus side that won their seventh consecutive Serie A title as “almost inhuman”The Bianconeri’s goalless draw against AS Roma at the Stadio Olimpico on Sunday was enough to secure them the league crown and their fourth consecutive domestic double.Nedved, who himself played for Juventus between 2001 and 2009, believes that the only thing that was missing from an otherwise brilliant season was winning the Champions League.“Allegri and the players were the stars of this seventh Scudetto,” the former midfielder told Tutti Convocati, via Football-Italia.Franck Ribery, FiorentinaFiorentina owner: “Ribery played better than Ronaldo!” Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Fiorentina owner Rocco Commisso was left gushing over Franck Ribery’s performance against Juventus, which he rates above that of even Cristiano Ronaldo’s.“This season was very difficult because our motivations were mainly for the Champions League, in which we missed the last step for a perfect season.“Still, we’ve worked every day to get to these results. Juventus are legendary, almost inhuman, animals even. These players have done something fantastic.”Juventus will next face the relegated Verona at their Allianz Stadium in Turin for their final game of the season.last_img read more

Eden Hazard expected to delay Chelsea contract talks

first_imgEden Hazard will likely continue to delay talks over a contract renewal at Chelsea, as the club desperately search for a replacement for Thibaut CourtoisThe Blues are now resigned to losing their first-choice goalkeeper after he failed to report for training once more on Tuesday and have now begun a late frantic search for a replacement.But while Chelsea have accepted that Courtois is now a lost cause, there is still hope that they can convince Hazard to commit his long-term future at the club by signing a new deal.Tammy Abraham, ChelseaChelsea hat-trick hero Tammy Abraham hopes for more Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Tammy Abraham hopes this season will be his big breakthrough at Chelsea after firing his first hat-trick for the club in Saturday’s 5-2 win at Wolves.While the 27-year-old has also expressed an interest in joining Courtois at Real for the new season, the Evening Standard has reported that Hazard has accepted Chelsea’s stance and reported to training yesterday.And with two years remaining on his current £200,000 a week contract, Chelsea feel that they are in a much stronger position to retain Hazard – unlike Courtois, who has less than 12 months on his deal.Maurizio Sarri’s side are prepared to offer Hazard a new £300,000 a week deal in order to ward off the advances of Real but the Belgium captain insists that he is in no rush to commit his future and intends to see how things develop further down the road.last_img read more