Politicians call for crackdown on social media toxic swamp after mosque shooting

first_img But while Morrison did not mention the likes of Facebook, Twitter and YouTube by name, his political opponent, Labor leader Shorten, was more forthright.”A platform like Facebook goes to potential advertisers and says, ‘We know everything about the users of Facebook, we can tell you everything so that you can geo-target and you can market to them,'” Shorten wrote in an op-ed for the Herald-Sun newspaper. “Well, if that’s your business model, fair enough; but you can’t go missing when it comes to hate speech.””Social media is a marvelous tool that has the potential to empower us, but too often it resembles a toxic swamp where wrongdoers can hide and where evil is nurtured,” he added.The comments follow a terrorist attack in New Zealand on Friday, when a gunman entered a mosque in central Christchurch and shot worshipers while they prayed, livestreaming the shooting on Facebook. The attack, which also involved a second shooting at another Christchurch mosque, claimed 50 lives. The alleged attacker, Brenton Harrison Tarrant, was an Australian national. New Zealand mass shooting shows tech companies can’t control viral tragedies 1.5M videos of New Zealand mosque massacre deleted by Facebook How Facebook, Twitter rely on you to stop spread of mosque shooting video Share your voice A man sits outside the Masjid Al Noor mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand, following the mass shooting.  Marty Melville/Getty Images Facebook has been accused of “going missing” when it comes to fighting hate speech and playing an “unrestricted role” in terrorist attacks, following two mass shootings at mosques in New Zealand on Friday.The comments come from Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison and the country’s opposition leader, Bill Shorten, who haven’t held back in criticizing the role technology companies have played in amplifying extremist views.Both politicians warn that the internet has given a home to the kind of white supremacist hate speech espoused by the alleged mosque shooter, an Australian national, saying tech companies must do more to stamp it out.In a letter to Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe ahead of the upcoming G20 summit in Osaka, Morrison said internet technologies are playing an “unrestricted role” in the spread of extremism, and that world leaders must lay out “clear consequences” not only for those who carry out terrorist attacks, but also “for those who facilitate them.” The letter was also sent to New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, who has said she plans on discussing the issue “directly with Facebook.” Facebook Twitter YouTube 1 As New Zealand counts the cost of the deadliest mass shooting in New Zealand history, attention has turned to the role the internet and social media played in the attack. While Facebook and Twitter deleted the alleged attacker’s social media accounts within hours of the attack, footage of the shooting spread quickly. The roughly 17-minute live clip was downloaded from Facebook and reuploaded across the internet on sites such as YouTube, with some users editing out the more graphic content in an attempt to circumvent censors.In a statement, a spokesperson for Twitter said the company was “committed to working and cooperating with governments around the world, particularly as it relates to safety and wellbeing” and that it has “rigorous and rapid response processes in place” for emergency situations.Facebook has previously said it deleted 1.5 million versions of the video within the first 24 hours of the attack. But Morrison is calling for a tougher approach to weeding out extremist content on the internet, saying technology firms have a “moral obligation to protect the communities which they serve and from which they profit.” He added that social media companies, content service providers and gaming platforms all had a part to play to keep communities safe. “We know that violent extremists use the internet for recruitment, radicalisation and to carry out their evil acts,” the prime minister’s letter reads. “That they will continue to try to use any means their disposal does not mean governments and technology firms should abrogate their responsibilities to keep our communities safe.”Facebook did not respond to a request for comment.Originally published March 18 at 5:32 p.m. PT.Update on March 18 at 9:27 p.m.: Adds comments from Australian opposition leader Bill Shorten.Update on March 19 at 4:02 p.m.: Adds comment from Twitter.  Related storiescenter_img Tags 1:23 Comment Facebook deletes 1.5M videos after shooting, Democrats… Tech Industry Internet Now playing: Watch this:last_img read more

Deepika Padukone reveals why she thinks Ranveer Singh is not apt for

first_imgDeepika Padukone, Ranveer SinghInstagramDeepika Padukone made a stunning appearance at Cannes 2019, but unlike Priyanka Chopra, the actress did not bring along her husband Ranveer Singh at the event.As Ranveer is known for his unique fashion sense, it was expected that he would accompany Deepika at Cannes 2019. When asked why Ranveer did not join her at the film festival, Deepika said that he would have been a better one to attend Met Gala as she would “top him” at the Cannes, according to Bollywoodlife.She had made a similar statement at Met Gala 2019 as well. “He has this crazy sense of dressing and I think he would be actually a perfect fit for the theme. I think he is one person who will 100 per cent do justice to the theme but I am the one representing him,” the actress had said at Met Gala some days ago.Met Gala is one such event where celebrities sport the quirkiest outfits and considering Ranveer’s flamboyant style sense, Deepika is not wrong in her views. Deepika Padukone at Cannes 2019.InstagramOn the other side, Priyanka was seen throwing some PDA with her hubby Nick Jonas at Cannes 2019. Before that, her outfit and an overall look at Met Gala was widely talked about. While she had sported one of the quirkiest looks at the event, scores of memes on her appearance had flooded the internet.On the work front, Deepika will next be seen in Meghna Gulzar’s Chhapaak that is based on the real-life story of an acid-attack survivor.last_img read more

Muslim scholars plead for Afghan peace

first_imgMohammad Nabi Ayoubi, (2nd R), Peer Mohammad Rohani, (3rd R), Khalifa Naween, (3rd L) Dr. Abdul Shakoor Majoor, (2nd L) attend the international Ulema conference for peace and security in Afghanistan in Jeddah on 10 July 2018. Photo: AFPMore than 100 Muslim scholars from around the world meeting Wednesday in the Saudi holy city of Mecca issued an urgent appeal for peace in Afghanistan as they ended a two-day conference.”The solution to the cause of the Muslim Afghani must particularly go through mutual understanding and direct peaceful negotiations,” read the closing declaration.”Reconciling between battling Muslims is one of the greatest and most honoured acts of worship,” it said.The international gathering, which focused on prospects for peace in Afghanistan, was sponsored by the Organization of Islamic Cooperation, based in nearby Jeddah.Yousef al-Othaimeen, the head of the 57-member pan-Islamic organisation, ended the meeting by urging a ceasefire for Afghanistan.”The OIC calls on all parties to observe a truce, respect a ceasefire and enter into direct negotiations,” he told reporters at the close of the conference.The scholars were received on Wednesday by Saudi King Salman, who expressed his country’s committment to a peaceful resolution in Afghanistan, according to state news agency SPA.The Taliban ignored an invitation from the OIC to attend the Mecca conference, Saudi daily Asharq al-Awsat reported Wednesday.Thus far, the Taliban has not responded to Afghan President Ashraf Ghani’s offers for dialogue, instead demanding to sit down with the United States, which has dismissed this proposal.Attacks occur on a near-daily basis in Afghanistan, where the US toppled the Taliban from power 17 years ago. On Wednesday, an unclaimed attack on an education department facility in eastern Afghanistan left at least 11 people dead.A recent ceasefire between Afghan security forces and the Taliban during the Islamic holiday Eid had raised hopes that an end to hostilities in the war-weary country was possible.But the Taliban refused the government’s request to extend their three-day ceasefire, launching attacks that have seen scores killed or injured.last_img read more