Weekend brings more drops in gas at the pumps

first_img Government expounds on Fuel price investigation Related Items:fuel prices, gas station Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 26 Jan 2015 – Fuel prices keep on falling as public outcry and media reports continue to draw attention to what many believe is a disparity between OPEC drops in the cost of oil by the barrel and costs per gallon at the pumps here. On Friday, one gas station dipped to under $5 per gallon on regular petrol; all on Providenciales now fall below $6 per gallon of gas at the pumps. On Thursday the country’s Premier was asked about the investigation which will reap a report on the pricing of fuel by next week and Hon Rufus Ewing was quizzed about dredging; gas station owners have said the cost to ferry in fuel is one of the reasons the TCI has seen little movement. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppcenter_img ENERGY COMMISSIONER SENT TO INVESTIGATE FUEL PRICES Recommended for youlast_img read more

Time Publisher Wants to Capture Readers from Cradle to the Grave

first_imgIt does appear that all the death talk has seeped into McCarrick’s sales pitch. He said that one of the reasons they launched Time for Kids was to capture readers at an early age. “We say ‘from the cradle ‘til when you’re put in the ground.’”More on McCarrick’s keynote here … CHICAGO—During his keynote address during the 2008 FOLIO: Show here, Time magazine president and worldwide publisher Ed McCarrick said he’s been fending off the “death of the news magazine” thing since the early seventies.“Pundits heralding the death of news magazines since I was on my way in the door [in 1973],” he said. “They were wrong then, and they’re wrong now.”But he also appears to be keenly aware of the importance of the Web.Despite the magazine’s Web site (relaunched again a couple weeks ago) accounting for just 11 percent of Time’s revenue, it’s growing—75 percent this year and projected growth of 35 percent in 2009—and McCarrick is quite bullish about it. “We’re at 82 million page views,” he said, responding—tellingly, perhaps, to a question about how large he expects the magazine’s print circulation to grow. “We feel 200 million page views is easily within reach.”last_img read more

NOW HIRING 10 New Job Openings In Wilmington

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are some of the newest job openings in Wilmington:Part-Time Guest Service Desk Team Member at TargetPart-Time Package Handler at FedEx WarehouseFull-Time Local Route Delivery Driver at Gordon Food ServiceFull-Time Field Service Scheduler at AGFAPart-Time Package Handler at UPSFull-Time Delivery Driver at FedEx WarehouseFull-Time CNC Programmer at ConforMISFull-Time Manufacturing Technician at ConforMISFull-Time Professional Drivers & Movers at Xpress MoversPart-Time Work at Vector Marketing(NOTE: Wilmington businesses — Feel free to send me your job postings at wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedNOW HIRING: 10 New Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”NOW HIRING: 10 New Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”NOW HIRING: 10 Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”last_img read more

Myanmar likely to take back 2000 Rohingyas in Nov

first_imgMyanmar Foreign Secretary Myint Thu speaks to journalists during his visit at a Rohingya refugee camp in Cox`s Bazar on 31 October 2018. Photo: AFPA top Myanmar official said Wednesday that his country would take back the first group of 2,000 Rohingya refugees from camps in Bangladesh in November despite widespread doubts over the proposal.Officials from the two countries announced on Tuesday that some of the 720,000 Muslim Rohingya who fled a deadly military clampdown in the Buddhist-majority country last year would start returning next month.Myanmar foreign secretary Myint Thu visited the camps in Cox’s Bazar on Wednesday to discuss the repatriations with refugees.Most repeated demands that they be given Myanmar nationality with full rights before they return.Thu said Myanmar has verified 5,000 names on a list of 8,032 Rohingya that Bangladesh authorities sent in February.“From that 5,000, the first batch will be about 2,000 people. And then a second batch will follow. So in mid-November we will receive the first batch,” Thu told reporters.Bangladesh officials said a new list of 24,342 Rohingya names was handed over in talks this week.But Rohingya representatives expressed strong doubts about going back despite the announcement.“We would rather die in the camp in Bangladesh. We will not return without any guarantee of citizenship or fully restored rights,” Abdul Hakim, one refugee from Myanmar’s Rakhine state, told AFP.The United Nations, aid groups and even Bangladesh authorities have said any repatriation must be voluntary.Oxfam spokesperson Rachael Reilly said the refugees “want to see justice served and an end to the violence and discrimination that have caused this crisis”.“It is deeply concerning that Rohingya people may be sent back to Myanmar to face the same persecution they fled,” she said.The 720,000 joined about 300,000 who fled earlier violence in Myanmar, where the Rohingya are refused citizenship and rights. Many brought harrowing tales of rape, murder and burning of villages.Investigators have said senior Myanmar military officials should be prosecuted for genocide, but Myanmar has rejected the calls, insisting it only targeted militants.The two neighbours first announced a large-scale repatriation plan in November 2017. But it has failed to advance, with each government blaming the other.last_img

After A Day Of Legal Shock And Awe Whats Next For The

first_imgAlex Wong/Getty ImagesSpecial counsel Robert Mueller (left) arrives at the U.S. Capitol for closed meeting with members of the Senate Judiciary Committee on June 21 in Washington, D.C.Five months into his mandate, Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller III unleashed a legal version of “shock and awe” on Monday with criminal charges against President Trump’s former campaign chairman and a guilty plea by a foreign policy aide.Mueller made no public comment about the charges or the next steps in an investigation that’s irritating the White House and riveting the nation. But there are some clues in the court documents about where the former FBI director and his investigators may be heading.1. The Foreign Agents Registration ActAmong the charges facing former campaign chairman Paul Manafort and his right-hand man Richard Gates is failing to register as agents of a foreign government, and making false and misleading statements about that. The grand jury indictment unsealed Monday accuses the men of working on behalf of Ukraine and telling the Justice Department their activities “did not include meetings or outreach within the U.S.”Those charges are controversial, in part because violations of the Foreign Agents Registration Act are rarely enforced. Kevin Downing, a lawyer for Manafort, told reporters outside the courthouse that prosecutors have used that “very novel” charge only six times since 1966, winning just one conviction.On Capitol Hill, however, Senate Republican Charles Grassley of Iowa offered praise for that approach: “It’s good to see the Justice Department taking seriously its responsibility to enforce” the law, Grassley said in a written statement.“I’ve been raising concerns about lackluster enforcement of this foreign influence disclosure law for years now, regardless of administration or political party,” he added. “The dirty little secret is that lots of people across the political spectrum in Washington have skirted their FARA obligations for years now with little to no accountability.”Grassley convened an oversight hearing on the issue in July, flagging work by Mercury LLC and the Podesta Group on behalf of what he calls “a front for the Ukrainian government.” The firms are mentioned in the indictment as “Company A” and “Company B.” A prominent Democratic lobbyist, Tony Podesta, announced he would step down from that firm Monday after the charges became public.At least one other person with ties to the Trump campaign, former national security adviser Michael Flynn, belatedly filed a foreign agent registration with the Justice Department this year connected with his work on behalf of Turkey. He has not been charged with a crime.2. Will Manafort fight?Despite an onslaught of pressure from federal investigators, including an FBI raid on his residence in July, Manafort has steadfastly denied wrongdoing, and people close to Manafort say he has little of use to offer the special counsel.Even so, the 31-page indictment suggests that federal investigators are not finished squeezing him. Authorities want to seize Manafort’s properties in New York and Virginia, at a time when he’s already strapped for cash. The court papers refer to business dealings with Manafort’s daughter and son-in-law, who have not been publicly charged with any crimes.And the Manafort indictment doesn’t refer to contacts between Manafort and Russians with close ties to Vladimir Putin, despite media reports that he emailed with a longtime Ukrainian client in Putin’s camp to offer private briefings on the election.3. Fallout from the Papadopoulos pleaThe guilty plea by George Papadopoulos, a 30-year-old former foreign policy adviser to the Trump campaign, detailed a series of contacts he had with people close to the Russian government in 2016. The court documents said Papadopoulos reported his conversations to a “supervisor” and “high-ranking” members of the campaign team.Investigators said that after his secret arrest in July, Papadopoulos has been meeting with the government “on numerous occasions to provide information and answer questions.”The message: He may be offering evidence against others still under investigation. Other people inside the Trump campaign also are said to have received overtures from Russians or Russian agents at about the same time that Trump named Papadopoulos as an adviser. One of them, Carter Page, traveled to Moscow at least twice last year.Thomas Breen and Robert Stanley, lawyers for Papadopoulos, said they had to refrain from comment on the case for now. But, they added, “We will have the opportunity to comment on George’s involvement when called upon by the court at a later date. We look forward to telling all of the details of George’s story at that time.”4. Will Mueller keep his job?Congressional Democrats reacted quickly after the indictments to insist that the independence of special counsel Mueller and his team must be protected. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said the rule of law is “paramount.”“The president must not, under any circumstances, interfere with the special counsel’s work in any way,” Schumer added. “If he does so, Congress must respond swiftly, unequivocally, and in a bipartisan way to ensure that the investigation continues.”At the White House, press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said there was “no intention or plan to make any changes in regards to the special counsel.”Trump lawyer Jay Sekulow told CNN he’s had no conversations with Trump about issuing pardons for Manafort or others implicated in the Russia investigation.But Mueller could charge more people in Trump’s world and bring even more heat onto the president’s camp — which might prompt Trump to revise his thinking about trying to get rid of the special counsel.And legal experts say they don’t know what might happen if Trump exercises his sweeping power to pardon people in a way that obstructs the Mueller probe.Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Sharelast_img read more

HPs webOS moves out of tablet foxhole into appliance mode

first_img HP looks to the ‘cloud’ (PhysOrg.com) — HP is set to spread the wings of its operating system for its smartphones and TouchPad tablet, webOS, and plant it into a wider technology space of an OS for cars and household appliances. HP’s webOS chief, Stephen DeWitt, who leads the webOS global business unit, is on an HP mission to build up an ecosystem of developers and manufacturers, according to a report in The Wall Street Journal. DeWitt said HP is looking into webOS embedded into cars and appliances. He said HP was into talks with auto and appliance makers but he did not specify any company names. HP’s webOS has a touchscreen interface and Internet connectivity. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. In late June, there was talk about HP courting Samsung. The potential win for HP would be in the fact that HP could license the software to Samsung, as a key hardware maker. Leo Apotheker, HP CEO, said HP was similarly talking to other companies about the webOS too.An operating system, on commercial terms, is only as viable as is the number of manufacturers and developers willing to climb on board. HP has good reason to be aggressive in growing a WebOS ecosystem, considering its investment in the webOS with its purchase of Palm at $1.2 billion last year. Sales of the HP tablet TouchPad which features webOS, have been less than startling.Beyond use in smartphones and tablets, Apotheker has championed the webOS as a superior operating system. “It’s not correct to believe that it should only be on HP devices. There are all kinds of other people who want to make whatever kind of hardware they make and would like to connect them to the Internet,” he has said. Making the webOS a device-compatible platform of choice for the future has been pushed to the top as an HP agenda item. Besides wanting to rev up a mission for cars and appliances, HP has sought to make a business-adoption case for webOS as enterprise-ready.“It’s not just about the tablet, Richard Kerris, an HP vice president, has said. “It’s about the OS, the ecosystem and connecting devices like phones, printers, tablets and computers together.”As for the OS chance of hitting a home run in the car and home-appliance industry, it is recognized that the competitive edge for appliance makers in the future will involve how smart their appliances can be. Users will grow accustomed to embedded systems in their kitchens that can tell them when the milk is running low or how to make an omelet.Likewise, the auto industry is using smart systems in numerous ways. Is the webOs, though, offering compelling enough reasons for manufacturers to scurry on board? That’s the question being asked by HP-watchers. They see a tough road ahead. Thilo Koslowski, analyst, notes that auto makers don’t take lightly the idea of switching technology partners in whom they have already invested. Microsoft’s embedded Windows OS is in use in appliances and vehicles; Google’s Android is reported to be gaining momentum as well. Last year, Panasonic Avionics, developers of entertainment systems for airplanes, said that it will use Android in products. Whirlpool told the WSJ it would not be adding the HP webOS to its appliances. Explore further © 2011 PhysOrg.com Citation: HP’s webOS moves out of tablet foxhole into appliance mode (2011, August 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-08-hps-webos-tablet-foxhole-appliance.htmllast_img read more

Frans de Waal Embraces Animal Emotions in Mamas Last Hug

first_imgThe two old friends hadn’t seen each other lately. Now one of them was on her deathbed, crippled with arthritis, refusing food and drink, dying of old age. Her friend had come to say goodbye. At first she didn’t seem to notice him. But when she realized he was there, her reaction was unmistakable: Her face broke into an ecstatic grin. She cried out in delight. She reached for her visitor’s head and stroked his hair. As he caressed her face, she draped her arm around his neck and pulled him closer. The mutual emotion so evident in this deathbed reunion was especially moving and remarkable because the visitor, Dr. Jan Van Hooff, was a Dutch biologist, and his friend, Mama, was a chimpanzee. The event — recorded on a cellphone, shown on TV and widely shared on the internet — provides the opening story and title for the ethologist Frans de Waal’s game-changing new book, “Mama’s Last Hug: Animal Emotions and What They Tell Us About Ourselves.” Read the whole story: The New York Timeslast_img read more