Criscito calls for Genoa to beat Sampdoria

first_imgThe so-called Derby Della Lanterna will be played on Sunday but the Grifone hasn’t defeated its neighbors since 2016The Derby Della Lanterna will be played with Genoa and Sampdoria on Sunday.But the Grifone hasn’t defeated its neighbors since May 2016.This is why footballer Domenico Criscito is calling for his team to give it its all in order to get a victory.“We’ve had a lot of time to prepare for this match, seeing as there was the break for international duty,” he was quoted by Football Italia.Cristiano Ronaldo, JuventusSerie A Betting: Match-day 3 Stuart Heath – September 14, 2019 Considering there is a number of perfect starts so early in the Serie A season, as well as a few surprisingly not-so perfect ones….“It’s an important game both for us and the fans.”“We always try to give our best and want to make the fans happy, because it’s been too long since Genoa won the derby,” he explained.“This is why we’ve got to give everything we have for our fans.”“Playing the derby as captain will be truly special and exciting,” he added.“Nobody can forget what happened to the people of Genoa and we’ll always remember the tragedy. I too crossed that bridge just a few minutes before it collapsed.”last_img read more

Update standoff ends in Poway

first_img KUSI Newsroom, 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsPOWAY (KUSI) – An hours-long standoff ended Sunday afternoon after a man barricaded himself in a Poway building for much of the morning and early afternoon.The standoff was taking place at an apartment attached to a business on the 14000 block of Poway Road.The road was blocked off between Garden Road and Sudan Road. Authorities confirmed that no one was in danger.The Sheriff’s Department said SWAT and crisis negotiation teams were at the scene. The department also urged media and others not to post pictures or video that could endanger deputies.“Please do not put the lives of deputies at risk by posting video or photos of their positions LIVE on TV, web or social media during the incident,” the department said.Sheriff Lt. Dave Perkins confirmed that the  standoff had ended by about 1 p.m. No details on how the situation was resolved or identifying information on the suspect was immediately available. Posted: February 17, 2019 Updated: 6:30 PM February 17, 2019center_img Update: standoff ends in Poway KUSI Newsroom Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

Tom Walker On What A Time To Be Alive Music As Therapy

first_imgWe caught up with Walker at our Santa Monica, Calif. headquarters to learn more about his upcoming album, how songwriting helps him work through lives challenges, his favorite venue he’s played at, and more.Your debut album What a Time to be Alive comes out soon, October 19th. How are you feeling about putting that out into the world?I’m happy, it’s cool. I’ve been working on it for ages and ages. It feels like it’s in a really good place. The songs are just really strong and I’ve picked up, I think I’ve picked up of like 120 songs, I picked 11. Its 45 minutes of music. Spent ages getting the track list. I know people listen to a lot of stuff on streaming and don’t listen to albums as much these days, but to me, a proper artist has a proper album. I wanted to make sure the flow and the mix of everything, the continuity, was all one thing and it was fluid and I feel like I’ve gotten there. We’ve been a bit pushed for time because we’ve had 150 gigs this year. If I’ve not been out on the road, I’ve been in the studio and it’s just been back and forth and back and forth, crazy. I’m really excited and I’m really happy, which I didn’t think I’d be, I thought I’d be super nervous, but I feel like I’m ready to put it out into the world and see what everybody thinks.How do you feel working on this album versus your EP that you came out with; how is the creative process different?With this album, I went with three different producers. I worked with Jim Abbiss who I made the Blessings EP with, Steve Mark who I did two of the singles with and Mike Spencer who I’ve done a couple of the singles and some of the album tracks. It’s a really amazing opportunity and quite rare to work with three producers of that caliber, at this stage in your career, when you’ve had one big song out. You know what I mean? It was such a cool experience and all three are really different and really unique in their own ways and brought the best out of me in a few different ways. It was really cool. I love being in studio, I really enjoy it. I’m a bit of a studio guy, if I’m not out on tour, I wanna be in the studio. As soon as I’m in the studio for too long, I wanna be out on tour. It’s been a good balance, doing that for the whole album. It feels good.Speaking of hit single, “Leave a Light On” is very emotionally stirring and has caught the attention of a lot of people worldwide. I read that it was about real people in your life. How has songwriting helped you process things that you’ve gone through in life? Have you gotten feedback from fans that your music has also helped them?I feel like songwriting, for me, is kind of therapy. If I do have issues and I do have troubles, the best way to work it out is to write a song about it. I think you mentally just internalize the problem and somehow, you just get through it a little quicker. That’s for me, that’s probably why I’m a songwriter, you know? It’s not gonna work for everybody. I just find, putting it on paper really helps it. And “Leave A Light On” in particular is about a friend of mine, who kind of had a bit of an addiction problem. I had messages from people all over the world saying they had a brother or a sister or a parent or a friend or anybody who’s gone through a similar thing and this song’s helped them get through something and when I wrote it, I never really expected that. It’s been a really cool side effect of writing the song. Other people have had issues and it’s helped them through it. It’s kind of cool that music does that. I never really thought of that when I wrote it. I didn’t expect the reaction that it got, it’s cool.I’ve had a few people come up to me as well and tell me some pretty tragic, heartbreaking stories. It’s always nice to meet people who’ve had their own experiences with the song and got through something pretty tough. Makes you feel good about what you’re doing. Because I think the music industry can feel a little selfish sometimes, like everything’s about you, but it’s nice to actually be helping some people through some stuff.You mentioned that you’ve been touring a lot. You’re finishing up your tour in the U.S., you’ve played Glastonbury – what’s your favorite show that you’ve played so far?Favorite show? There’s been loads this year. I think Coco in London. I was so nervous cause it was the biggest venue we’d ever played in London and we sold it out super quickly. All of the label and all of my publishers and everybody came down, all my friends who I wrote the songs with and producers that I worked with, everybody was there. It was super nerve-racking, but it was amazing.Glastonbury was special as well because I finished by set, which I could only do acoustically, I couldn’t even get tickets for the band. I basically got offered the slot because I already bought a ticket for the festival. I didn’t have any help with my gear but this little trailer and had my guitar amplifier and my acoustic, I was lugging it through Glastonbury.It took an hour and an half to get it from my car to the stage, and then from the stage back to the car, another hour and an half. So like three hours for the day, just getting there and back. I did the set and it was amazing, the tent was full, which I couldn’t believe because there’s so many amazing artists playing at Glastonbury, I was like, “Well, nobody’s gonna come and fill this tent up”, but they did and it was great. Then as soon as I came out and finished my set, Elbow, which is like one of my favorite bands, were doing a secret set on the stage right there. So, I literally finished, put my gear away, came out, and they started their show and I just sat and watched it. I was like, how cool is this? I just finished my first set at Glastonbury and then I’ve come out and I’ve watched one of my favorite bands play a secret gig. That was pretty special. News Tom Walker On ‘What A Time To Be Alive,’ Music As Therapy & More Facebook The singer/songwriter tells us about his upcoming debut album, how songwriting is a therapeutic process for him, what it was like to play Glastonbury, and moreAna YglesiasGRAMMYs Sep 14, 2018 – 12:24 pm U.K.-based singer/songwriter Tom Walker’s debut full-length album What a Time to Be Alive is coming out on Oct. 19, and he’s pretty thrilled about it. A single he released last year “Leave a Light On,” a touching, emotionally-charged track that he wrote about a friend dealing with a substance problem, has already gained him an international following.It is clear that music has been Walker’s lifeblood since his early days listening to Michael Jackson’s Thriller on this dad’s record player as a kid, and that he is ecstatic to be sharing his passion—his music—with the world. Twitter NETWORK ERRORCannot Contact ServerRELOAD YOUR SCREEN OR TRY SELECTING A DIFFERENT VIDEO Sep 14, 2018 – 11:46 am Singer/songwriter Tom Walker On Music As Therapy https://twitter.com/IamTomWalker/status/1039872093637079040 Email Tom Walker On Music As Therapy & More tom-walker-what-time-be-alive-music-therapy-more I heard Thriller was one of your favorite albums growing up, and perhaps still is?Yeah, I don’t listen to it as much these days, but it’s the first thing I remember ever hearing on vinyl. My dad had a pretty cool stereo at the time. My sister, unfortunately blew it up at a house party. Thriller was one of the first things I can remember dancing to around the living room, as a kid to and just being really scared, you know all the sounds effects that they put in that song and the speech at the end of it. It was really frightening when you were a kid. I just thought that was really cool.Growing up listening to music, did you know that was what you wanted to be an artist, or how did that change as you grew up and started pursuing music? I thought I wanted to be a guitarist, not an artist. I didn’t start singing and writing songs properly until I was 19. I think I was quite late to the party, in that sense. I’ve since made up for it, but I just loved guitar. I was a massive fan of AC/DC, Foo Fighters, Muse – I went to see all of them live. B.B. King, Chuck Berry, I love Ray Charles, I just like a bit of everything. I always was fascinated by music and when I saw my favorite bands doing a live show or seeing them on TV, I just thought “That looks so much fun.” I kind of wanted to pursue some form of that, I didn’t realize I would end up being an artist and being a songwriter and a singer. It just kind of all fell into place naturally, which was nice. I never really forced or didn’t set out to be like “I wanna be famous,” I just wanted to play music.You studied music in college. Do you think the degree helped prepare you for working in the music industry?I think the degree was really interesting because, in England it’s not free to go to university, but they lend you the money. It’s the best loan you’ll ever get. It’s a bit harder now, but when I was doing it at the time, it was fairly easy to get it. It just gave me three years to really focus on songwriting. The degree was good, but I felt there was bits of it that really weren’t that relevant to the industry. It could’ve been better in that sense. It’s an amazing degree, but actually getting into the industry, there was loads of things that they never told or warned us about, but it gave me the time to really build my craft. The songwriting teachers there were amazing. Really helped me with the songwriting, for sure. Also, I had Logic lessons, which really helped me recording and getting to production and stuff like that. The kind of music business side of it wasn’t really there, but the rest of it was great.Is there kind of like a dream collaboration that you have in the near future or?I’d love to write a song with Paolo Nutini. I’ve loved all of his albums so far and I love his voice. He was born in Scotland, I was also born in Scotland. I’ve always wanted to meet him, but he doesn’t really gig or do many shows. I’ve never actually seen him live and he’s one of my favorite artists. Every time I look online, he’s not doing anything. I feel like I’ve missed out. I should’ve gone when he was gigging, but hopefully he’ll come back with an album in another two years after like five years, whatever its been and it’ll be absolutely banging and he’ll go out and do a tour and I might hopefully see him on the circuit one day.The Shadowboxers On Working With Justin Timberlake, Covers & New MusicRead morelast_img read more

Wilmington Band Parents To Hold Trivia Night Fundraiser On April 5

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — The Wilmington Band Parents Association is holding its annual Trivia Night on Saturday, April 5, 2019 at the Wilmington Knights of Columbus Hall (112 Middlesex Avenue). Doors open at 7pm.  Trivia begins at 8pm.Tickets cost $20 per person. Tables of 10 are available. For tickets, please contact whswildcatbandparents[at]gmail.com.  (Checks can be made payable to The Wilmington Band Parents Association.)Attendees are asked to bring their own your own food for their table, and to come prepared for the raffle basket table and cash bar.Sponsorship opportunities are also available. Learn more about them HERE.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWilmington Band Parents Raffling Off A Jumbo Wildcat Connect Four GameIn “Community”Tickets Still Available For Wilmington Rotary Trivia Night On June 14In “Community”Wilmington Band Parents To Hold Trivia Night Fundraiser On March 18In “Community”last_img read more

New mass spectrometry technique clouds early European inflation theories

first_img © 2010 PhysOrg.com The research, led by Anne-Marie Desaulty, sought to answer once and for all the question of why the whole of Europe experienced a dramatic, inexplicable rise in overall prices, shortly after the discovery of the new world.Until now, researchers have had to rely on the results of mass spectrometry analysis of lead and copper found in coins to trace its origins, because the results obtained from doing so on silver couldn’t be trusted. Unfortunately, due to the difficulty of reading isotope results for lead, and the fact that copper was used at later dates to re-mint coins, no real conclusions could be drawn from the results of such tests. Now however, using the new technique, the team was able to discern that silver from Mexico didn’t begin appearing in Spanish coins until the inflationary period was over; though it did become the principal source of silver in such coins thereafter.In the past, mass spectrometry tests on silver were fraught with difficulty due to the ratio of its two stable isotopes, silver-107 and 109; making them extremely difficult to measure. New advances in mass spectrometry devices however, coupled with multiple collectors, has made the process more sensitive; sensitive enough so that the results of such tests can now be trusted; and those findings suggest that it was not the sudden importation of Mexican silver as a means of minting Spanish coins that led to the inflation, because there simply wasn’t enough of it present in coins during the period in question.Unfortunately though, because the study was able to rule out the influx of Mexican silver as a cause for the inflation, a new gap in knowledge has been left behind, which will send scholars and researchers back to the drawing boards to explain why in fact, prices in Europe rose as they did, and why it happened for so long. Major silver mining centers and mints in the Viceroyalty of Peru. Also shown are the Pb geological model ages T in millions of years of various metal ores. Image (c) PNAS, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1018210108 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Ancient coins teach researchers about modern society More information: Isotopic Ag–Cu–Pb record of silver circulation through 16th–18th century Spain, PNAS, Published online before print May 23, 2011, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1018210108AbstractEstimating global fluxes of precious metals is key to understanding early monetary systems. This work adds silver (Ag) to the metals (Pb and Cu) used so far to trace the provenance of coinage through variations in isotopic abundances. Silver, copper, and lead isotopes were measured in 91 coins from the East Mediterranean Antiquity and Roman world, medieval western Europe, 16th–18th century Spain, Mexico, and the Andes and show a great potential for provenance studies. Pre-1492 European silver can be distinguished from Mexican and Andean metal. European silver dominated Spanish coinage until Philip III, but had, 80 y later after the reign of Philip V, been flushed from the monetary mass and replaced by Mexican silver. Citation: New mass spectrometry technique clouds early European inflation theories (2011, May 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-05-mass-spectrometry-technique-clouds-early.html (PhysOrg.com) — Using a new coupled mass spectrometry technique that employs multiple collectors, researchers in France have shown that it was not an influx of silver from the America’s that caused high inflation in Europe from the early 1500’s to mid 1600, as some historians have long believed. Their results, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) show that the gradual replacement of coins made from Spanish silver to imported Mexican silver, did not occur until nearly fifty years later. Explore furtherlast_img read more

Faces of friends look happier than strangers

first_imgPeople are more likely to perceive familiar faces to be happier than those of strangers, even when both express the same emotions, a study suggests. Familiarity – just having ‘expertise’ with someone else’s face through repeated exposure – affects the happiness you perceive in subsequent facial expressions from that person, researchers said.”Familiarity not only influences traditional ratings of liking, attractiveness, but also impacts ‘deeper’ perceptions of the actual emotion you can extract from that person,” said Evan Carr of Columbia Business School in the US. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfResearchers including those from University of California, San Diego in the US, morphed images of male and female faces to create faces that varied in the type and degree of emotion expressed.This process resulted in a continuum of morphed faces that ranged from 50 per cent angry to neutral to 50 per cent happy. The team divided the images into two sets. A total of 50 undergraduate student participants came to the lab for a “memory task.” Each participant saw a series of images – the neutral expressions from one of the two image sets – and was tasked with tracking the colour and number of squares that appeared randomly on some images. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveParticipants then viewed a series of face pairs in a perceptual task, where they had to indicate whether the happier face was above or below the line shown on screen. Each pair included a familiar and an unfamiliar face and the faces showed the same objective level of emotion.Researchers found that participants were more likely to identify the familiar face as the happier one in the pair, despite the fact that the faces showed the same emotion to the same degree. They were also more likely to identify the familiar face as happier when the faces were 50 per cent happy than when they were 25 per cent happy, researchers said. In a second experiment, the team asked 40 undergraduate participants to look at a series of faces and decide whether each face was either “happy or angry.” Researchers found that the results replicated those of the first experiment, participants were more likely to identify familiar faces as happy compared with unfamiliar ones, but only when the faces were emotionally neutral or positive. Their estimates of how happy the faces were increased as the positive features increased.The data indicated that familiarity actually shifted how participants perceived the emotional content of the faces – that is, a familiar face needed to have fewer objectively happy features for it to be classified as happy compared with an unfamiliar face. The study was published in the journal Psychological Science.last_img read more

How Square Earned a 3 Billion Valuation

first_img1. Fulfill a need. Square’s mission is to revolutionize consumer payments from both sides. Its original device, a box-shaped card reader that attached to mobile phones, allowed users to accept debit and credit card payments by swiping the card through the reader. Its complimentary mobile app could also process payment information that was entered manually.Everyone from plumbers to food-truck owners suddenly had a third way to get paid besides cash and check, and customers could use their plastic in more places than ever before. Like its predecessor and competitor PayPal, which also shook up the payments industry when it launched its online money transfer service in 2000, Square founded its business on a pressing social need.Related: How ‘NFC’ and Mobile Wallets Will Change the Way Retailers Do Business2. Innovate while remaining focused on your core product. Square’s proprietary card reader, or dongle, is still the company’s trademark, but it has continued to innovate without distorting its core service.In May 2011 it announced two new mobile apps, Card Case and Register. Among other functions, Card Case allows users to receive and store digital receipts and to locate Square-compatible merchants. While Card Case expanded Square’s customer-side services, Register was targeted at sellers. It turns an Apple iPad into a complete point-of-sale terminal, making it possible to handle a variety of functions in conjunction with an existing Square account — generating and sending receipts, offering discounts and tracking sales in real-time with a suite of analytics.3. Expand through smart partnerships. In August, Square announced that it was teaming up with Starbucks to handle all of the retailer’s debit and credit card payments at its nearly 7,000 stores nationwide. In return, Starbucks was responsible for one-eighth of the total $200 million in financing that Square raised in its latest funding round.Square also has partnerships with the retail establishments that sell its dongle. Late last month, the company announced that its card reader was available for purchase in more than 1,000 AT&T stores. The card-swipe reader can now be found at more than 20,000 retail locations in the U.S.Related: How Instagram Went From Idea to $1 Billion in Less Than Two Years Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Enroll Now for Free September 19, 2012center_img image credit: SquareThree years ago, Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey started a company called Square to offer business owners a new way to accept payments over mobile devices. This week, after closing a $200 million round of financing, the San Francisco-based company is reportedly valued at $3.25 billion.It’s enormous news for a startup that has grown from about 150 employees a year ago to more than 400 today. Square says it’s processing more than $8 billion in payments each year.So how has Square managed it? Here are three strategic choices the young company made that helped put it on its current trajectory: min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.last_img read more