San Diego artist Casey Lynn Hancock goes viral on Instagram

first_imgSo neat meeting local artist Casey Hancock! She has gone viral on Instagram and is creating some really neat stuff!! @KUSINews @KUSI_GMSD #artist #tuesday #sandiego pic.twitter.com/6xwAFjcSRh— Allie Wagner (@alliewagnertv) March 5, 2019 San Diego artist Casey Lynn Hancock goes viral on Instagram KUSI Newsroom March 5, 2019 Posted: March 5, 2019 KUSI Newsroom, center_img Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsAccording to Casey’s website she said “This has been the scariest thing I have ever done, but also the most amazing experience of my life. There is no doubt in my mind that this is what I was meant to do. I am so grateful to wake up every morning happy and doing what I love.” Updated: 5:12 PM 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – About two years ago, Air Force veteran, Casey Hancock made the decision to leave her marketing job, move to San Diego, and pursue painting full time. In that two years Hancock has amassed 40 thousand followers on Instagram and been commissioned to do pieces for celebrities, such as NBA star Dwight Howard.Although she has no formal training, she did always have a love for art. She works in all different mediums including acrylic, oils and air brushing. Hancock enjoys working on large, colorful pieces and including metallic details. You can follow Casey at @caseypaintings on Instagram or you can check out her website caseypaintings.com. If you would like a painting from Casey, she is always asking people to contact her for custom pieces.Casey described some of her completed project’s and how she got started to KUSI’s Allie Wagner in our first live shot of the morning. Check out what she had to say below.last_img read more

Time Publisher Wants to Capture Readers from Cradle to the Grave

first_imgIt does appear that all the death talk has seeped into McCarrick’s sales pitch. He said that one of the reasons they launched Time for Kids was to capture readers at an early age. “We say ‘from the cradle ‘til when you’re put in the ground.’”More on McCarrick’s keynote here … CHICAGO—During his keynote address during the 2008 FOLIO: Show here, Time magazine president and worldwide publisher Ed McCarrick said he’s been fending off the “death of the news magazine” thing since the early seventies.“Pundits heralding the death of news magazines since I was on my way in the door [in 1973],” he said. “They were wrong then, and they’re wrong now.”But he also appears to be keenly aware of the importance of the Web.Despite the magazine’s Web site (relaunched again a couple weeks ago) accounting for just 11 percent of Time’s revenue, it’s growing—75 percent this year and projected growth of 35 percent in 2009—and McCarrick is quite bullish about it. “We’re at 82 million page views,” he said, responding—tellingly, perhaps, to a question about how large he expects the magazine’s print circulation to grow. “We feel 200 million page views is easily within reach.”last_img read more

Thin Reads Launches to Track EBook Singles Market

first_imgA new web-based e-book singles aggregator launched this week. Called Thin Reads and started by Howard Polskin, who left his executive vice president post at the MPA in December, it’s a consumer-facing database of e-book singles available from Amazon, Barnes & Noble and iBookstore.E-book singles, defined as works of short fiction or non-fiction that are between 5,000 and 25,000 words long, have been a burgeoning market, one that has its fingers in magazine publishing as well. The Atlantic just formed a partnership with Longreads—and Hearst, Rodale and Condé Nast, among others, have all been selling e-books and e-singles for the last couple years. So far, Thin Reads has a database of more than 700 e-book singles dating back to 2010, from more than 150 publishers. Polskin is segmenting out data including title, pub date, publisher, author, description, length and retail platform.Early findings note that 54 percent of e-singles available in the Thin Reads database are “original” works, meaning they were created originally for the electronic platform.Conversely, Thin Reads data reveals that 12 percent of e-singles are “encore” works, meaning they’ve appeared previously in another format.last_img read more

ATT and Comcast say theyve hit new milestone in fight against robocalls

first_img Comment AT&T Comcast Mobile Tech Industry Getty Images One way wireless carriers are working to stop the flood of unwanted robocalls is through authentication systems that verify caller IDs. One drawback so far has been that these systems work only on calls to and from the same provider. On Wednesday, AT&T and Comcast said they’ll offer call authentication between networks later this year. Customers will be able to see verified calls from all participating carrier providers. AT&T and Comcast’s authentication system is the industry’s first to verify calls between separate providers, according to the companies’ release. The two carriers verified calls earlier this month between AT&T’s Phone digital home service and Comcast’s Xfinity Voice home phone service, the companies said in the release. “While authentication won’t solve the problem of unwanted robocalls by itself,” the companies said, “it’s a key step toward giving customers greater confidence and control over the calls they receive.”This comes after the Federal Communications Commission said carrier companies need to implement robust call authentication systems this year. In February, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said companies should get the systems installed by the end of 2019 or the FCC will consider “regulatory intervention.” Share your voice 1 Tagslast_img read more

Emmanuel Macrons lead in French presidential elections triggers Sensex Nifty rally

first_imgEmmanuel Macron, head of the political movement En Marche !, or Onwards !, and candidate for the 2017 French presidential election, celebrates after partial results in the first round of 2017 French presidential election, at the Parc des Expositions hall in Paris, France April 23, 2017.ReutersBenchmark indices BSE Sensex and NSE Nifty ended with gains of about 1 percent on Monday tracking global cues, mainly centrist candidate Emmanuel Macron qualifying for the May 7 run off in the first round of French presidential elections held on Sunday.The Sensex closed 290 points higher at 29,656 while the 50-scrip Nifty ended at 9,218, up 98 points.”France led gains in European equities as investors speculated that pro-growth centrist candidate Emmanuel Macron will win the presidential election after he made it through to the second round,”  brokerage Motilal Oswal Securities said in a note.”Strong global cues and better than expected quarterly results by HDFC Bank, ACC and UltraTech lifted market. Moreover, fall in oil price, hopes of GST implementation and positive domestic cues boosted the market sentiment. Asian markets like Nikkei surged nearly 1 percent and European markets gained between 2-4 percent after French election (results),” the brokerage added. The rally was also supported by upbeat Q4 results by HDFC Bank last week, triggering a spurt in many bank stocks, including state-owned lender Vijaya Bank that hit a fresh 52-week high of Rs 76.80 before closing 8.74 percent higher at Rs 75.25.   The US Federal Reserve’s observation on GST’s potential to boost India’s GDP growth by up to 4.2 percent also added to the positive mood on the exchanges.Top Sensex gainers were GAIL, Axis Bank, HDFC Bank and Larsen & Toubro.  HDFC Bank shares closed 2.41 percent higher at Rs 1,533 on better business prospects. “With tier 1 capital of 13.3%, strong capacity amid the moderate growth cycle and significant digitization initiatives, the bank is well placed to benefit from the expected pick-up in the economic growth cycle,” Motilal Oswal Securities said in another note.Later in the day, Reliance Industries will be declaring its Q4 results. The stock closed 1.19 percent higher at Rs 1,416. Apart from Vijaya Bank, other stocks that hit a new 52-week high included India Cements, Hathway Cable, Dilip Buildcon, Future Retail, South Indian Bank and Piramal Enterprises.The Indian rupee closed at 64.44 to the US dollar on Monday, a gain of 0.27 percent from the Friday closing of 64.61.Gold prices lost Rs 350 to close at Rs 29,650 per 10 gm while silver ended at Rs 41,700 per kg.Among major companies, Wipro, ICICI Prudential Life Insurance, IDFC Bank, LIC Housing Finance and Zensar Technologies will be declaring their Q4 results on Tuesday.last_img read more

Rail link with Sylhet resumes after 3hr

first_imgThe rail communications between Sylhet and rest of the country resumed on Monday afternoon after being suspended for at least three hours due to a hill slide triggered by heavy rainfalls in Lauachhara forest of Kamalganj in Moulvibazar of Sylhet, reports news agency UNB.The communication resumed after cleaning all the mud from the rail track at around 12:00pm, witnesses said.Earlier, a large chunk of mud fell on the rail track at Lauachhara hilly area halting the communication since 8:15am this morning, Sreemangal Station master Faizur Rahman said.last_img

EideMiladunnabi 21 Nov

first_imgEid-e-Miladunnabi, the day of birth and demise of Prophet Hazrat Muhammad (SM), will be observed in the country on 21 November (Wednesday) as the moon of Rabiul Awal was sighted in Bangladesh sky on Friday.According to UNB, the decision was taken at a meeting of the National Moon Sighting Committee held at the Islamic Foundation’s Baitul Mukarram office, said an Islamic Foundation press release.Religious affairs secretary Anisur Rahman presided over the meeting attended, among others, by joint secretary to the religious affairs ministry MA Hamid Jamaddar, Islamic Foundation secretary Kazir Nurul Islam, Govt Alia Madrasa principal M Alamgir Rahman and Baitul Mukarram National Mosque imam Muhammad Mizanur Rahman.On this day in 570, the 12th of Rabiul Awal of the Hijri calendar, Muhammad (pbuh) was born in Makkah of Saudi Arabia with divine blessings and messages of peace for mankind. He also passed away on the same day.last_img read more

Saudis now call Khashoggi killing grave mistake

first_imgActivists and protesters march to the US Department of State building after holding a demonstration calling for sanctions against Saudi Arabia and against the disappearance of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, outside the White House in Washington, US on 19 October. Photo: ReutersSaudi Arabia on Sunday called the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi at its Istanbul consulate a “huge and grave mistake,” but sought to shield its powerful crown prince from the widening crisis, saying Mohammed bin Salman had not been aware.The comments from foreign minister Adel al-Jubeir were some of the most direct yet from Riyadh, which has given multiple and conflicting accounts about Khashoggi’s killing on 2 October, first denying his death and later admitting it amid an international outcry.“This was an operation that was a rogue operation. This was an operation where individuals ended up exceeding the authorities and responsibilities they had,” Jubeir said on the US broadcaster Fox.Related Coverage“They made the mistake when they killed Jamal Khashoggi in the consulate and they tried to cover up for it,” he said.The weeks of denial and lack of credible evidence in the face of allegations from Turkish officials that Khashoggi had been killed have shaken global confidence in ties with the world’s top oil exporter.US treasury secretary Stephen Mnuchin said Saudi Arabia’s admission that the Washington Post columnist was killed in a fistfight was a “good first step but not enough,” though he added it was premature to discuss sanctions against Riyadh.Three European powers – Germany, Britain and France – pressed Riyadh to provide facts, and chancellor Angela Merkel said Germany would not export arms to Saudi Arabia while uncertainty over Khashoggi’s fate persisted.Late on Sunday, the Saudi Press Agency said both Saudi king Salman and prince Mohammed had called Khashoggi’s son, Salah, to express condolences.Jubeir had extended condolences to Khashoggi’s family earlier on Sunday. “Unfortunately, a huge and grave mistake was made and I assure them that those responsible will be held accountable for this,” he told Fox.Jubeir said the Saudis did not know how Khashoggi, a Saudi national and US resident, had been killed or where his body was. He also said prince Mohammed was not responsible.Khashoggi vanished after entering the consulate to obtain documents for his upcoming marriage.After two weeks denying any involvement in the 59-year-old’s disappearance, Saudi Arabia on Saturday said Khashoggi, a critic of the crown prince, died during a fight in the building. An hour later, another Saudi official attributed the death to a chokehold.“Nothing can justify this killing and we condemn it in the strongest possible terms,” Germany, Britain and France said in their joint statement.“There remains an urgent need for clarification of exactly what happened … beyond the hypotheses that have been raised so far in the Saudi investigation, which need to be backed by facts to be considered credible.”The White House said late on Sunday that US president Donald Trump had spoken to French president Emmanuel Macron and the two had discussed a range of issues including circumstances surrounding Khashoggi’s death.Reflecting international scepticism over its account, a senior Saudi government official laid out a new version that contradicts previous explanations.The latest account includes details on how 15 Saudis sent to confront Khashoggi had threatened him with being drugged and kidnapped and killed him in a chokehold when he resisted. A member of the team dressed in Khashoggi’s clothes to make it appear as if he had left the consulate.Erdogan to SpeakTurkish officials suspect Khashoggi was killed inside the consulate by the Saudi agents and his body cut up. Turkish sources say authorities have an audio recording purportedly documenting Khashoggi’s murder.In a speech on Sunday, Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan appeared to suggest he was getting ready to release some information about the Turkish investigation, and would do so at his weekly speech on Tuesday to members of his ruling AK Party.Erdogan has remained largely silent on the case, although Turkey’s pro-government newspapers have released information about events at the consulate.Turkey’s Anadolu agency said early on Monday that Erdogan and Trump had spoken on the telephone and agreed that “all aspects” of the case needed to be cleared up.For Saudi Arabia’s allies – particularly in the West – the question will be whether they believe that the prince, who has painted himself as a reformer, has any culpability. King Salman, 82, has handed the day-to-day running of Saudi Arabia to him.Trump calls Saudi account of Khashoggi death incomplete“I am not satisfied until we find the answer. But it was a big first step, it was a good first step. But I want to get to the answer,” Trump told reporters this weekend, when asked about the Saudi investigation and Riyadh’s firing of officials.In an interview with the Washington Post, Trump said that “obviously there’s been deception, and there’s been lies.” He had suggested last week that “rogue killers” might have been responsible for Khashoggi’s death, a comment critics called an effort to play down the crisis.A leading Republican US senator said he believed the crown prince was behind the killing, adding that the Saudis had lost credibility in their explanations of his death. “Yes, I think he did it,” Bob Corker, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, told CNN, referring to the crown prince.King Salman ordered the dismissal of five officials, including Saud al-Qahtani, a royal court adviser seen as the right-hand man to Prince Mohammed, and deputy intelligence chief Ahmed Asiri, Saudi state media reported on Saturday.The king also ordered a restructuring of the intelligence service, to be led by Prince Mohammed, suggesting the prince still retained wide-ranging authority.Some governments and prominent executives have said they would pull out of a forthcoming investment conference in Saudi Arabia.According to the senior Saudi official, the Saudi team rolled up Khashoggi’s body in a rug, took it out in a consular vehicle and handed it to a “local cooperator” for disposal.last_img read more

A Look Inside Kinder HSPVAs New Downtown Campus

first_img X – / 17UPDATE (January 7, 2019): The Kinder High School for the Performing and Visual Arts opened the doors on its new downtown campus today, where more than 750 students will study music, dance, theater, and other arts. The 168-thousand square-foot-building spans five stories and has multiple theaters. The Kinder name is also a new addition, after the Kinder Foundation pledged $7.5 million to plug a budget shortfall in the school’s construction in exchange for naming rights. However, as News 88-7’s Laura Isensee reported last month, the school district has yet to receive the funds.Back in June, Houston Matters producer Michael Hagerty went on a tour of the campus to check on its progress and learn more about its facilities.Work continues on the new downtown campus for Houston’s Kinder High School for the Performing and Visual Arts. While students aren’t expected to be in place until January, the facility’s many classrooms, dance studios, stages, and performance spaces are starting to take shape.One of the key components of the new campus is the Denney Theater, which can seat 800 people. It can be used for every kind of performing art as well as to host all-school assemblies.“The main theater, the Denney Theater, is sort of the heart of the whole thing, so everything surrounds this from the first floor all the way to the fifth floor,” Principal Scott Allen, told Houston Matters. Representatives from the project’s construction firm, McCarthy Building Companies Inc., said work is more than 90 percent complete. Allen said the school will move from its longtime Montrose campus between Thanksgiving and Christmas, and students will begin classes at the new facility when the new semester begins in January.“The location was the most important just because we’re blocks away from the theater district,” Allen said. “We have partnerships with all the arts organizations, and so for us to be able to either walk a few blocks or jump on the train and take kids down to the Alley or the Hobby or Jones it just strengthens those partnerships.”The school also plans to have artists from those organizations on campus to teach master classes. Listen to the audio below for the full tour of the campus with. Listen To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: 00:00 /09:18 Sharelast_img read more

Woodson Set Out to ReEducate the MisEducated Negro

first_imgWestern education, from the elementary through the tertiary levels, had “mis-educated” many a Negro with propaganda and “heresy” about their so-called inferiority and lack of worth, Woodson posited. Even Harvard University, supposedly a bastion of first-tier scholarship, progressive thought and enlightenment, had “ruined more Negro minds than bad whiskey,” Woodson is quoted as saying.The Black scholar elaborated on his theory in the seminal tome, The Mis-Education of the Negro.“The so-called modern education, with all its defects… does others so much more good than it does the Negro, because it has been worked out in conformity to the needs of those who have enslaved and oppressed weaker peoples,” the book’s preface reads. “For example, the philosophy and ethics resulting from our educational system have justified slavery, peonage, segregation and lynching…. Negroes daily educated in the tenets of such a religion of the strong have accepted the status of the weak as divinely ordained, and during the last three generations of their nominal freedom they have done practically nothing to change it.”Woodson goes on to explain, “No systematic effort toward change has been possible, for, taught the same economics, history, philosophy, literature and religion which have established the present code of morals, the Negro’s mind has been brought under the control of his oppressor. The problem of holding the Negro down, therefore, is easily solved. When you control a man’s thinking you do not have to worry about his actions. You do not have to tell him not to stand or go yonder. He will find his ‘proper place’ and will stay in it. You do not need to send him to the back door. He will go without being told. In fact, if there is no back door, he will cut one for his special benefit. His education makes it necessary.”Black elevation and empowerment—in fact the very survival of the race—therefore, began with a sound education that included the teaching oftrue Black history, Woodson said.The Misses Cooke’s school room, Freedman’s Bureau, Richmond, Va., illustrated in Frank Leslie’s illustrated newspaper. Carter G. Woodson said the mis-education of lacks regarding their history had been used as a tool of control. (Jas. E. Taylor/Library of Congress)“If a race has no history, it has no worthwhile tradition, it becomes a negligible factor in the thought of the world, and it stands in danger of being exterminated,” Woodson said in one of his articles. “The American Indian left no continuous record. He did not appreciate the value of tradition; and where is he today? The Hebrew keenly appreciated the value of tradition, as is attested by the Bible itself. In spite of worldwide persecution, therefore, he is a great factor in our civilization.”Woodson began his quest to chronicle Black history and to legitimize scholarship in that field throughout his college years, but was often ridiculed and dissuaded by his professors and others. But in 1915, Woodson defies his critics—those leaders of Western academia and politics and a leery public who had long insisted Blacks had no history—by publishing his first text on African-American history, The Education of the Negro Prior to 1861. He takes it even further, later that year, when he also establishes the Association for the Study of Negro of Life and History (which later becomes the Association for the Study of African American Life and History.) Often going without a salary, Woodson led the organization’s efforts to research, uncover and publish their findings about Black life and history in the Journal of Negro History, a quarterly academic journal launched in 1916.In 1926, Woodson and the ASNLH sponsored the first Negro History Week in February, which was meant to coincide with the birthdays of President Abraham Lincoln and abolitionist Frederick Douglass, both venerated figures in the Black community.As with his earlier efforts to promote Black history, the observance initially was not widely received.“There was a push in America at the time, particularly within academia, to unify all history as one—to create just one American story of the past, and usually that did not include Black history. When people did speak about Black history back then it was denigrated,” said Kendi, the Albany university professor. “For him to say we should appreciate it and celebrate it was revolutionary.”Woodson’s vision of the Negro History Week went beyond his goal of educating African Americans about themselves—though that was part of his aim; it was also about educating others about the value of Blacks’ contributions to America and the world.According to a Jan. 23, 1932 AFRO article, Woodson explained that the celebration of Negro History Week would be for nought if Black, White and all children were not given a chance to learn about all aspects of Black history in their schools.“Unless Negro History Week can be used to accomplish such a purpose, the mere celebration would be meaningless. To have numerous essays and speeches on what we have done while failing to do this thing which is necessary for our present good will mean absolute failure so far as this observance is concerned,” he is quoted as saying in the article.“The watchword throughout this season, therefore, should be to uproot propaganda in the minds of students and place in their hands certain works to inform them as to the contributions of all races. Interracial goodwill will be thereby stimulated, that this country may become a land of happiness and prosperity.”With the passage of time, Negro History Week caught on, according to an essay by Daryl Michael Scott, president of ASALH: Black history clubs sprang up; teachers demanded materials to instruct their pupils; and progressive Whites, not simply White scholars and philanthropists, stepped forward to endorse the effort.The “Black Awakening” and the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s further amplified the importance of and interest in the historic contributions of African Americans. And, in 1976, the celebration was expanded to a month through a proclamation by President Gerald Ford, who urged Americans to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.”Though Black History Month has since become a national fixture, there are some who question whether the observance is still necessary or even beneficial in what some have claimed as a post-racial society.Experts say that is not surprising as it mirrors what some Woodson detractors have said from the beginning.“If you look back now at his lifetime, most people assume his movement was widely embraced when it was not,” Kendi said. “He received a huge amount of resistance both within the Black community and outside.”For example, among assimilationists, anything that played up racial differences was a no-no.“There have always been Black people who view Black progress as Black people assimilating with Whiteness,” Kendi added.In the presence of such self-effacing thought, persistent socioeconomic disparities and racism, Woodson would have likely argued that Black History Month, and its spotlighting of Black history and achievement, is very much an ongoing necessity, Kendi said.“Carter G. Woodson would have looked at the persistent disparities and said that clearly we are not an inclusive society [and that] so long as we have White Americans, Black Americans and those of other races who see Black people as inferior there is still a need for multiculturalism and the study of Black history.” Carter G. Woodson and the then-Association for the Study of Negro Life and History launched Negro History Week in February 1926. (AFRO Archives)Socrates, the renowned Greek philosopher and sage, once urged his followers to “Know thyself.” Thousands of years later, that advice continued to resonate, becoming the underpinnings of Carter G. Woodson’s theories about the study of Black history.“Carter G. Woodson was a visionary,” said Ibram Kendi, assistant professor of Africana Studies at the University of Albany. “He essentiallysought to build within the Black community a greater consciousness of their history—the successes, failures, triumphs—all the complexities of African-American history.”By all accounts, a young Woodson grew up poor in physical assets but rich in knowledge and wisdom. At his father’s knee, he learned about self- and race-pride…, that going through someone’s back door—a sign of inferiority—was never an option, no matter the cost. And from the Civil War veterans like his father, he also learned the lessons of self-determination and the value of Black contributions to the past and ongoing American story.But, as Woodson looked within his community he noted those values of self-love, pride, self-knowledge, self-determination and self-worth were missing from too many. And, he placed the blame squarely on the “defects” of Western education, which was used as a tool to maintain the status quo.“He believed that the negative ideas (Black) people had internalized about themselves were because of their ignorance about their own history,” said Professor Kendi.last_img read more

Frans de Waal Embraces Animal Emotions in Mamas Last Hug

first_imgThe two old friends hadn’t seen each other lately. Now one of them was on her deathbed, crippled with arthritis, refusing food and drink, dying of old age. Her friend had come to say goodbye. At first she didn’t seem to notice him. But when she realized he was there, her reaction was unmistakable: Her face broke into an ecstatic grin. She cried out in delight. She reached for her visitor’s head and stroked his hair. As he caressed her face, she draped her arm around his neck and pulled him closer. The mutual emotion so evident in this deathbed reunion was especially moving and remarkable because the visitor, Dr. Jan Van Hooff, was a Dutch biologist, and his friend, Mama, was a chimpanzee. The event — recorded on a cellphone, shown on TV and widely shared on the internet — provides the opening story and title for the ethologist Frans de Waal’s game-changing new book, “Mama’s Last Hug: Animal Emotions and What They Tell Us About Ourselves.” Read the whole story: The New York Timeslast_img read more

Traversing through unexplored paths

first_imgA collection of ten short stories – one both universal in canvas yet decidedly ethnic in fabric, ‘The sacred sorrow of sparrows’, authored by Siddharth Dasgupta and published by Niyogi Books examines the lives of an Afghan baker, a Parsi exile, a north Indian qawwali singer, and a Lebanese mystic, amongst several others. Traversing cities such as Lucknow, Puna, Bombay, Dubai, Tokyo, Istanbul and Isfahan, this collection dips into cities and places not often explored in novels and short-story collection narratives. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe book which was launched in the presence of poet and novelist Pervin Saket, filmmaker and screenwriter Shikha Makan and publisher of the book Trisha De Niyogi has an eclectic assortment of characters for readers to explore. During the launch, Pervin Saket shared her thoughts about the book as she found herself deeply immersed in the collection’s richly textured canvas of characters and cities. She noted, “There is a tone and cadence to Siddharth’s writing that is nothing short of hypnotic. The words refuse to let go. This poignant, evocative and poetic collection is one reader will find themselves revisiting often, on their own journeys through life and love.” Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveSimilar feelings were also shared by filmmaker Shikha Makan as she commented on how the stories inhabited a sensual collage of memory, nostalgia and love. She quoted, “There is a potent beauty to the writing. Even loss and longing have the power to heal in Siddharth’s hands. This is a definite read to reflect and absorb the beauty and complexities of our lives.”The author being asked on his literary motivations, he cited “Travel and the deep bliss of fresh horizons have acted as instigators to many of the stories, while the characters are an amalgamation of reality, fragments, and whispers”. Through ten stories and ten main protagonists, this book paints a portrait of the universal emotion that strikes the deepest and lingers the longest – sorrow. A nuanced narrative of the eternal human existence, this collection embraces light, laughter, hope, and that silently pulsating craving called love, delivering a communal meditation on mortal failings and human persistence. The stories traverse the length and breadth of the world picking up a train of melody from the sonorous sound of the Bosphorus to the resounding refrain of the Qawwali, from the quiet streets of Isfahan to a crowded city in Japan, from two lovers fraught with desire in Bombay to one man’s spiritual awakening in Lebanon.Each story, mired by the undercurrent of simple occurrences and profound epiphanies, also forms an unwitting part of a Sufi’s journey as he navigates the world in his mystic inquiry of the unknown.last_img read more